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Additional Forts

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor The University of Chicago Press ePub

Additional Forts

Additional forts in Texas that are not on the designated Texas Forts Trail but that will be of interest:

FORT BLISS

Fort Bliss, located in El Paso, is a U. S. Army post established in 1848 as defense against hostile Indians and to assert U. S. authority over lands acquired after the Mexican War. Headquarters for Confederate forces in the Southwest during the Civil War, it was later a refitting post for military efforts against Apache chief Geronimo. Today it is used as a U. S. Army Air Defense Center and for combat training for allied nations.

Fort Bliss Replica Museum is located at Pleasanton Road and Sheridan Drive, Building 600. The museum has a replica of the adobe buildings of Fort Bliss. A walk through the buildings takes you on a history tour of the fort from 1848 to 1948. Open daily 9–4:30.

Closed Christmas, New Year’s, Easter and Thanksgiving. For additional information call 915-568-4518.

El Paso

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14. Is COPS Coming to Your Neighborhood?

Mary Beth Rogers The University of Chicago Press ePub

14

Is COPS Coming to Your Neighborhood?

New York, 1986

Texas Lieutenant Governor William P. Hobby Jr. and I share a cab to La Guardia Airport on a crisp fall afternoon. It is one of those interminable rides out of Manhattan, with the mix of high speed, quick stops, and long waits that sends most Texans in New York into orbit. But I am relatively free of anxiety because we have plenty of time before our plane departs and Hobby is calm because . . . Hobby is always calm, sometimes even maddeningly so.

We have been in New York to see the bond rating agencies about the financial condition of the State of Texas, which has not been good since the price of oil slipped from $21 to $11 a barrel. Wall Street is wary of Texas’ ability to meet its obligations, and we have been part of a delegation to reassure investment bankers and bond analysts that state officials will behave responsibly and with fiscal “prudence.” No one in the state can do a better job of reassuring Wall Street than quiet, serious—even shy—Bill Hobby, who since 1972 has stood guard against extremism in Texas government.

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15. We Are the Only Alternative

Mary Beth Rogers The University of Chicago Press ePub

15

We Are the Only Alternative

San Antonio, 1986

“Most people have come into our communities to destroy them . . . the Klan . . . the dope dealers . . . the developers. . . . The people have looked to their ministers to defend and protect them.”1

The speaker is the Reverend Nehemiah Davis, the distinguished black pastor of the Mount Pisgah Baptist Church in Fort Worth. The setting is the modern new Catholic chancery of the archdiocese of San Antonio. The audience is a group of about 60 Catholic priests, Protestant ministers, and Texas community leaders from eight Texas Industrial Areas Foundation organizations who are meeting to get to know each other better and determine how they can exert statewide influence as a network. Some of them have driven 13 hours from El Paso to be at the meeting, and several of the El Paso representatives speak no English. So the low rumble of simultaneous translation from English to Spanish accompanies the dialogue, which is about power and how to solidify it locally and leverage it statewide.

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6. Anger Gives You Energy

Mary Beth Rogers The University of Chicago Press ePub

6

Anger Gives You Energy

Los Angeles, 1986

“Pastor Sinnott, please leave the room and wait in the hall!”

Edward T. Chambers, teacher, issues the command, and the Reverend Thomas Sinnott, student, follows it.

Chambers, director of the Industrial Areas Foundation, is teaching a seminar on power at Mount St. Mary’s College in the hills overlooking Los Angeles. Tom Sinnott is a Lutheran minister from New Jersey, and he is one of about 100 people from across the nation who are attending the IAF’s training program for church leaders and community activists.1

During the next 10 minutes, Chambers orders other people to leave the room as well—a youth gang social worker from East Los Angeles, a school teacher from El Paso, a lawyer from East Brooklyn, a Methodist minister from St. Louis. All obey the order. After all, Chambers is the head guy, the leader, the man in charge of the program. But the program is about power, and about how most middle-class and poor people give consent to have it taken away from them.

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FORT PHANTOM HILL

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor The University of Chicago Press ePub

Fort

Phantom Hill

Continue along Highway 283 from Fort Griffin straight into Albany.

Albany became the county seat of Shackelford County in 1874, and soon overtook and passed Fort Griffin in population and business. Sallie Reynolds Matthews lived here, whose life story, along with that of the community, is related in a frontier classic, Interwoven. The title comes from the intermarriage of members of two outstanding families of the county, Matthews and Reynolds.

Albany’s awareness of its past is immediately noticeable in the historical preservation in the town. Also Albany produces the “Fort Griffin Fandangle” each year, an historical pageant put on by home talent. In the early 1930s, Robert Nail, a Princeton graduate in drama and a Phi Beta Kappa, began to apply his talent to the fascinating story of the Clear Fork country frontier. Through the years he made the production an event of renown. Since his death his associates have continued this fine production.

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