26 Slices
Medium 9781574414875

FORT PHANTOM HILL

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor The University of Chicago Press ePub

Fort

Phantom Hill

Continue along Highway 283 from Fort Griffin straight into Albany.

Albany became the county seat of Shackelford County in 1874, and soon overtook and passed Fort Griffin in population and business. Sallie Reynolds Matthews lived here, whose life story, along with that of the community, is related in a frontier classic, Interwoven. The title comes from the intermarriage of members of two outstanding families of the county, Matthews and Reynolds.

Albany’s awareness of its past is immediately noticeable in the historical preservation in the town. Also Albany produces the “Fort Griffin Fandangle” each year, an historical pageant put on by home talent. In the early 1930s, Robert Nail, a Princeton graduate in drama and a Phi Beta Kappa, began to apply his talent to the fascinating story of the Clear Fork country frontier. Through the years he made the production an event of renown. Since his death his associates have continued this fine production.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414363

16. There Is No Substitute for the Fire

Mary Beth Rogers The University of Chicago Press ePub

16

There Is No Substitute for the Fire

Austin, 1986

Ernie Cortes and I join Ernie’s wife Oralia and several of his Texas organizers in the bar of the Ramada Inn on the south bank of the Colorado River. The hotel is old, rather shabby, and off the beaten track for the legislators and lobbyists who flock into Austin for politics and business. So it is quiet this Friday evening. We can talk and relax. Robert Rivera, who has just become a new father, is there, along with two Catholic sisters—Pearl Ceasar and Mignonne Konecny—who are organizing in El Paso and Fort Worth. The group is awaiting the arrival of Sister Christine Stephens and other organizers from around the state who are coming to Austin for a meeting of organizers from each of the local organizations. Cortes brings them together frequently, and their meetings are both joyful reunions and serious strategy sessions. And there are reports—progress reports, book reports, research reports—even “scouting” reports for new people and new ventures. Cortes usually presides and often tells the organizers, “I’ll give you three minutes to talk if you’re good, but if you’re boring I’ll cut you off in 30 seconds.” So the meetings are punchy, packed with information, and laced with good humor. A meeting is scheduled for the next day. Tonight, the organizers are just glad to see one another, reflecting a comfortable camaraderie that has built up among them over the years.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414875

FORT RICHARDSON

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor The University of Chicago Press ePub

Fort

Richardson

The northernmost fort of the line to be established was Fort Richardson, located near Jacksboro on US Highway 281, 62 miles northwest of Fort Worth.

Jacksboro and Jack County were named after two Texas Revolutionary patriots, brothers William H. and Patrick C. Jack. The brothers were from a family of patriots. Their grandfather, Captain James Jack of Mecklenburg, North Carolina, was one of the signers of the famous Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence during the American Revolution. Their father, Patrick Jack, a prominent lawyer in Wilkes County, Georgia, was an officer in the War of 1812. The Jack brothers both graduated from the University of Georgia with law degrees, and shortly afterward headed for Texas. William arrived in San Felipe in 1830, and was joined by Patrick in 1832. Patrick was arrested with William B. Travis at Anahuac in 1832; William was with Sam Houston at San Jacinto.

After the war, Patrick served in the Texas House and as District Judge of the Sixth District. William served as Secretary of State under Burnet in 1836, and served terms in both the Texas House and Senate. The brothers died of yellow fever in 1844.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414363

12. A Theology That Does Not Stop

Mary Beth Rogers The University of Chicago Press ePub

12

A Theology That Does Not Stop

Los Angeles, 1976

Sister Maribeth Larkin has only a small role to play today at city hall when members of a new East Los Angeles community group make their presentation to the city council. All she has to do is to translate from Spanish to English the words of the local leaders who will present the concerns of the United Neighborhoods Organization (UNO) to the council. But she is queasy. Fear grips her stomach, and the telephone call from Ernesto Cortes doesn’t help.

“I’m testing you out,” Cortes tells her. “We’ll see how well you do today and then decide how we can use you.” That’s all the shy and slender, clear-eyed Sister of Social Service needs to lose her breakfast, even consider calling in sick. How can she possibly stand up and talk in front of the politicians and news media in the chambers of the Los Angeles City Council? Yet, how could she even consider backing out with so many people depending on her? Once again, fear and duty—the hallmarks of her life—provoke conflict within Maribeth Larkin. As usual, duty wins the battle, but the fear remains and turns to panic when she and almost 200 UNO members arrive to see that the council chambers are already full.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414363

14. Is COPS Coming to Your Neighborhood?

Mary Beth Rogers The University of Chicago Press ePub

14

Is COPS Coming to Your Neighborhood?

New York, 1986

Texas Lieutenant Governor William P. Hobby Jr. and I share a cab to La Guardia Airport on a crisp fall afternoon. It is one of those interminable rides out of Manhattan, with the mix of high speed, quick stops, and long waits that sends most Texans in New York into orbit. But I am relatively free of anxiety because we have plenty of time before our plane departs and Hobby is calm because . . . Hobby is always calm, sometimes even maddeningly so.

We have been in New York to see the bond rating agencies about the financial condition of the State of Texas, which has not been good since the price of oil slipped from $21 to $11 a barrel. Wall Street is wary of Texas’ ability to meet its obligations, and we have been part of a delegation to reassure investment bankers and bond analysts that state officials will behave responsibly and with fiscal “prudence.” No one in the state can do a better job of reassuring Wall Street than quiet, serious—even shy—Bill Hobby, who since 1972 has stood guard against extremism in Texas government.

See All Chapters

See All Slices