4039 Chapters
Medium 9781574411973

F

Edited by Peter B. Lane and Ronald E. Marcello University of North Texas Press PDF

Index

COW outpost, 154

Creech, Bill, 122

Crimea, 17

Cuban Missile Crisis, 101

Curtis, Bob, 72-73

Cyprus, 245–46, 245n13

E

Eaker, Ira, 121

East Prussia, 23

Eastern Front, 7, 13–14, 19

Efate, New Hebrides, 52

Eglin AFB, 208

Eighth U. S. Army in Korea

(EUSAK), 134, 137; retreat,

141

Eisenhower, Dwight D., 111

Election of 1900 and antiimperialists, 260–261n9

Enola Gay, 78; Smithsonian exhibit, 86 escape attempts, 200–4, 200–

201n18

ETA (Euskadi ta Askatasuna),

236

Eurocentrism, 231-232

D

Dallas-Fort Worth International

Airport, 65 daylight high-altitude precision bombing, 35

D-Day, 86

De Custine, Marquis, 213

De La Cruz, Madame, 209 declaration of Jihad against U.S.,

244

Defense Attaché Office, 221

Defense Intelligence Office, 219

Defense Intelligence School

(Bolling AFB), 209

Defense Science Board Readiness

Task Force, 123n15

Denton Chamber of Commerce,

51

Denton Record-Chronicle, 51

Denton, Jeremiah, 197, 197n12,

198n13, 205n23 deterrent strategy, 117

Dhahran, Saudi Arabia (Khobar

Towers), 239

Dios Dios, 263

Divine, Robert, 48, 85

Dixon, Robert, 122, 224

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Medium 9781574412734

Chapter 7 • Working the West Coast 1958

Helene LaFaro-Fernandez University of North Texas Press PDF

• 

Chapter 7  •

Working the West Coast

1958

As I was now living with my girl friends in Hollywood, when

Scotty returned to Los Angeles he shared Victor’s digs in Manhattan Beach. The big scene was still at the Lighthouse in Hermosa.

Scotty would sit in regularly and met a lot more musicians who were doing the same. Drummer Eddie Rubin, who later worked with Neil Diamond, remembers that Scotty always had a bag of sunflower seeds in his pocket and nibbled them constantly. He did one casual gig with Scott and said that over the years all the bass players he met were envious that he got to meet and play with

Scott, that he was an idol to all of them. Eddie said, “Scotty was a virtuoso, he just had it. Came out of nowhere and was way ahead of his time. His approach, concept, chops. He was a prodigy, had something special.You thought he was playing a violin or a guitar.

No one played the bass like he did, what he got out of it. There has never been a trio like that Evans trio. If Bird was alive then,

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Medium 9781574412802

Embrace on the Neck

Amy M. Clark University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574412024

Chapter 3. The Faultless Starch Library

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

A

n unusual collection of thirty-six little booklets called

The Faultless Starch Library records an interesting era of history in a very different mode. Created in the early

1900s to advertise Faultless Starch, the contents of the library and the story of its creator give an interesting picture of “the folk” at the turn of the century in a unique and interesting manner.

Located in the “west bottoms” of Kansas City, Missouri, near the point where the Kansas River flows into the Missouri River, the

Faultless Starch Company still produces starch for Americans. The company lost vital information about their history in two wellremembered floods in June 1903 and July 1951. Although the company still retains three complete sets of the original booklets, the flood destroyed the records of the creators of The Faultless

Starch Library.1

There is one clue to the past that time and the flood did not erase. Although none of the booklets carried his name, the company believes that D. Arthur Brown wrote the text. Who was this man? Certainly a large part of the character of D. Arthur Brown can be seen in the spirit of the light-hearted little booklets. An intense search in Kansas City revealed new answers—a testimony to the immortality of a very special printer.2

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Medium 9781574413540

14. The Great Captains

Chuck Parsons University of North Texas Press ePub

14

The Great Captains

“TEXAS RANGER. [T]HERE IS A SORT OF MAGIC ABOUT THE WORD. THERE IS SOMETHING ABOUT IT THAT MARKS THE MAN SO TITLED AS AN ELEMENT APART FROM THE GENERAL TERM OFFICER; SOMETHING THAT MARKS HIM IN THE PUBLIC MIND AS A SUPER-LAW ENFORCER. AND THERE IS SOMETHING MORE THAN MEN BEHIND IT ALL; THERE IS A TRADITION, AND EACH MAN—LIKE CAPTAIN JOHN HUGHES—CONTRIBUTES SOME PART TO THAT TRADITION.”

—C. L. Douglas, The Gentlemen in White Hats, 1934

In the history of the Texas Rangers there were many captains; the names of Jack Hays, Samuel Walker, Ben McCulloch, Rip Ford, Sul Ross, John B. Jones, and L. H. McNelly deserve the title of great as much perhaps as Brooks, Hughes, McDonald, and Rogers.1 Of those featured in chapters in the 1996 Rangers of Texas, all were deceased prior to the “great captains” beginning their careers. They were Rangers during the heyday of the horseback Ranger while the careers of the four “great captains” transitioned from the horseback days into the beginning years of the automobile. All were instrumental in creating the mystique of the Texas Ranger, the recognition of which exists perhaps more so today.

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