126 Slices
Medium 9781617450426

Refashion: Flared Pants to Skinny Pants

Suzannah Hamlin Stanley Stash Books ePub

Refashion

Flared Pants to Skinny Pants

For years I have been transforming bootcut or flared dress pants into matchstick-straight pants. I found I could give old wardrobe staples a second life as flattering and fitted pants that are great for the office or more formal looks. This transformation will make the most out of shopping your closet for brand new pants.

Most trousers are easy to work with since their side seams don’t have topstitching to pick out. If you want to do this project with jeans, see Variation for Jeans.

You Will Need:

•Bootcut, wide-leg, or flared pants (or jeans)

•Standard sewing supplies

•Pinking shears (recommended)

•Fabric pen or chalk (optional)

Get It Done

Refer to Removing Stitches for guidance.

1. Turn the pants inside out and put them on. Place pins along the side seams to mark how fitted you want the legs to be. (Ask a friend to help pin if necessary.) Take equally from the front and back, keeping the old seam allowances centered and folded smoothly together.

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Medium 9781617450426

Embellish: Contrast-Trim Blazer

Suzannah Hamlin Stanley Stash Books ePub

Embellish

Contrast-Trim Blazer

The contrast edge-trimmed blazer look is preppy and fun, and you can do it yourself using any color of double-fold bias tape as the trim and any blazer or jacket you have. You can add this kind of trim to anything, really—imagine it on a lightweight trench coat, a miniskirt, or the legs of shorts. Bias tape comes in many, many colors, so you have lots of possibilities.

You Will Need:

•Blazer, jacket, or other structured garment

•½˝ (13mm) double-fold bias tape in a contrasting color

•Standard sewing supplies (sewing machine recommended, or you could hand sew using a small, neat whipstitch to attach the binding on the outside and the underside)

Get It Done

Refer to Stitch in-the-Ditch for more information.

1. Open up the bias tape and find the slightly narrower half. We’ll call this the “right” side. Pin the right side of the bias tape to the right side of the blazer, beginning at the center back pleat opening and leaving 1˝ (2.5cm) of bias overhanging the leading edge. Pin very carefully at the curves.

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Medium 9781607059608

Spark 3. Take a Class

Carrie Bloomston Stash Books ePub

JAIME JENNINGS AND AMBER CORCORAN OWN FANCY TIGER CRAFTS, A RETAIL CRAFT AND CLASS SHOP IN DENVER, COLORADO. THEY HAVE HOSTED AN OPEN CRAFT NIGHT EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT FOR SEVEN YEARS. “BEING IN THIS COMMUNITY IS ONE OF OUR TOP REASONS FOR DOING WHAT WE DO, AND IT DRIVES OUR LOVE OF OUR CRAFTS,” SAYS JAIME.

The main thing I hear from people about what keeps them from their creative dreams is: “But I didn’t go to school for that.” This lack of training can make people feel paralyzed. While an education is not the only route to achieving your dreams, studying something definitely has its perks. You get an amazing energy and buzz from taking a class. You learn about technique, craft, and process—the bones of a working practice. You get tips from others in the field about integrating that practice into your life. You develop a vocabulary and learn how to see and discuss what you make (critique).

Formal training instills in you a sense of confidence. Confidence comes from gaining fluency. Classes will help you feel comfortable exploring your creativity. When you start something new, you are not expected to be good. You just need to have an open heart and be gentle with yourself as you learn.

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Medium 9781617450150

Pocket Pals

Kirstyn Cogan Stash Books ePub

Pocket Pals

Finished Size: Pocket: approximately 4˝ × 4˝; pals: 2˝–3˝ × 3˝–3½˝

Always have a friend in tow with a playful Pocket Pal. These pals travel well in their very own keepsake pocket. Take any simple outfit, attach a pocket with a pal inside, and away your little one goes!

Materials

Quilting-weight cotton: ⅛ yard, a fat eighth, or a fat quarter

Wool-blend felt: 1 sheet 12˝ × 18˝ each of a variety of colors for pals

Stuffing material: very small amount for each pal

All-purpose sewing thread in coordinating colors

8½˝ × 11˝ paper: 1 sheet for each template (pocket or pal)

Fabric-marking pen (Always test on a scrap of fabric before using. I recommend FriXion pens.)

Appliqué glue (I like Roxanne Glue-Baste-It.)

Hand-sewing and embroidery needles

Embroidery floss or crewel wool that coordinates with felt

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Medium 9781607054863

Forest Curve

Alissa Haight Carlton Stash Books ePub

76″ × 80″

This quilt will fit a full bed—or a twin bed with a lot of overhang. A quilt this big is always great to have around the living room to wrap up in while watching a movie.

The most basic of designs, this pattern simply involves sewing together long vertical strips in varying widths. The gradual decrease in size of the dark green strips creates the illusion of a curve.

Based on 42″ fabric width.

Fabric A (dark green): 3¾ yards

Fabric B (light green): 1 yards

Fabric C (optional yellow print): 21½″ × 10½″

Backing: 5 yards

Binding: yard

Please be sure to read Notes on Making the Quilts in This Book (page 6). Label the pieces as you cut.

If you find it easier, don’t trim your strips to 80″. You can piece the entire quilt top using the extra- long strips, and then trim the top to 80″.

Fabric A (dark green)

1. Cut 2 strips 21½″ × WOF (selvage to selvage) and sew end to end; trim A1.

2. Cut 2 strips 16½″ × WOF and sew end to end; trim A2.

3. Cut 2 strips 10½″ × WOF and sew end to end; trim A3.

4. Cut 2 strips 6½″ × WOF and sew end to end; trim A4.

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