91 Chapters
Medium 9781855209510

Chapter 1 - Why An Elan

Gordon Lund Brooklands Books ePub

“Lots Of Trouble Usually Serious” – Myth or Legend. The Lotus virgin, an often-quoted term in Lotus Club circles, refers to people who have taken the plunge into the unknown, “Well it’s only a car isn’t it?” The mystique of the marque has all the hallmarks of prestige, uniqueness, charisma and most of all ELAN. The French definition of Elan is panache, speed, effervescence, style, liveliness, etc.

Most Lotus owners will give you a different reason for buying the particular model they drive. The legacy of Formula 1, the performance per pound (sterling), the road-holding potential and ride. You name it, the reason will be there. It is in fact all of these things and more.

Many buyers of old Lotus, whatever the model, will have come from motoring backgrounds where the very basics of automotive reliability are expected in the most decrepit of old bangers, given a little bit of on-going maintenance here and there. Not so with the Lotus. What you have to understand is that the Lotus, when bought new, was a rich man’s toy. When passed on to second and third owners, after the guarantee had expired, the unfortunate owner then found he was on his own. In the mid-seventies, the cars began to suffer from neglect. Parts were expensive, if you could find them. Dealers were rare and scattered to the four winds. Unreliability became the password and the mud stuck. In the hands of unwary unfortunates who attempted to run these vehicles on a limited resource and experience, disaster was the only outcome.

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Chapter 19 - Preparing Elans for Concours Presentation

Gordon Lund Brooklands Books ePub

There are two ways of starting off with a classic car of any description for concours presentation. One is to be extremely fortunate in having a totally original low mileage example that has never been out in the wet and treated with TLC since it left the factory. The second is to rebuild a well-used or neglected example to a standard equal to the first.

The first option is extremely difficult to realise because of the rarity of such finds, and if you did, they command such a high price they become like a collectors wine were the cork is never removed from the bottle.

Since the second option is the most likely contender, it is imperative that the standard of the build and finish is as good as or approaching that of the factories. When renovation is undertaken, adhere to the standard specification wherever possible and avoid bolt on goodies even if they were a period fitting. If you are to use the car on a regular basis then hidden improvements cannot be frowned upon such as fitting an alternator if later models of the same car had them fitted at the factory. The same goes for tyres as long as they are a modern equivalent.

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Chapter 18 - Preparation for the Big Day

Gordon Lund Brooklands Books ePub

Setting up

Fill the petrol tank and then raise the car to sit on railway sleepers on its wheels. Work the suspension to level out the ride height. Weight the car as recommended in the workshop manual or ask some nimble people of similar weight to sit in the car. With the torque wrench set at the correct readings, tighten up all the suspension nuts and bolts that were left loose previously. Return the car to the ground and check the ride height with the heights quoted in the workshop manual.

Before you do anything else, check all around the car for the obvious things you may have missed. Double check that all hoses are tight and that there are no petrol leaks. Connect up the battery and remove the spark plugs from the engine. Turn the engine by hand with a spanner on the engine pulley bolt, ensuring that all is free. Remove the spanner. spark plugs from the engine. Turn the engine by hand with a spanner on the engine pulley bolt, ensuring that all is free. Remove the spanner.

Under the bonnet. All finished and ready to fire up

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Medium 9781855209657

Chapter 2 Clutch

Greg Hudock Brooklands Books ePub

Note: Models with 1.9 Litre and 2.4 Litre (5-cyl.) engine can also be fitted with a clutch cable operation. The clutch diameter is not the same for all engines, as it depends on the performance of the engine.

To remove the clutch unit, it will be necessary to separate the engine from the transmission, as has been described in Section Engine or remove the transmission from the vehicle, as described in Section Transmission.

Mark the clutch in its fitted position on the flywheel if there is a possibility that the clutch unit is to be re-used. To remove the clutch, unscrew the six bolts securing the pressure plate to the flywheel, lift from the flywheel followed by the driven plate, which will now be free. Before removing the driven plate, note the position of the longer part of the driven plate hub, as the driven plate must be refitted in the same way.

Install in the reverse sequence to removal, noting the following points:

Fig. 2.1. – The component parts of the clutch assembly.

Fig. 2.2. – Using the special VW tools to lock the flywheel and to centre the clutch driven plate.

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Medium 9781855209701

Chapter 8: Engine Types

Greg Hudock Brooklands Books ePub

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