337 Slices
Medium 9782067182042

For Kids

Michelin Michelin Travel & Lifestyle ePub

Woodland Park Zoo aaa

Phinney Ave. N. t 206-684-4800. www.zoo.org. Open May–Sept daily 9:30am–6pm. Rest of the year daily 9:30am–4pm. $17.75, $11.75 children.

Covering 92 acres, this world-class zoo is highly acclaimed for its conservation ethic (the zoo is home to 35 endangered species) and naturalistic habitats. It offers dynamic glimpses of 1,100 animals engaged in natural behavior: grizzly bears fish for trout in a stream on the Northern Trail, orangutans shimmy up trees in Trail of Vines, zebras dash about in African Savanna, and jaguars peer warily from behind a kapok tree in Jaguar Cove.

Pacific Science Centeraa

200 Second Ave. N. t 206-443-2001. www.pacificsciencecenter.org. Open year-round Mon–Fri 9:45am–5pm (til 6pm Sat–Sun). Closed Tue Sept–May. $16, $11 children (ages 6-15).

Pacific Science Center
©John Keatley/Pacific Science Center

Grizzly bear, Woodland Park Zoo
©Ryan Hawk/Woodland Park Zoo

See All Chapters
Medium 9782067182042

Parks and Gardens

Michelin Michelin Travel & Lifestyle ePub

Woodland Park Zoo aaa

Phinney Ave. N. t 206-684-4800. www.zoo.org. Open May–Sept daily 9:30am–6pm. Rest of the year daily 9:30am–4pm. $17.75, $11.75 children.

Covering 92 acres, this world-class zoo is highly acclaimed for its conservation ethic (the zoo is home to 35 endangered species) and naturalistic habitats. It offers dynamic glimpses of 1,100 animals engaged in natural behavior: grizzly bears fish for trout in a stream on the Northern Trail, orangutans shimmy up trees in Trail of Vines, zebras dash about in African Savanna, and jaguars peer warily from behind a kapok tree in Jaguar Cove.

Pacific Science Centeraa

200 Second Ave. N. t 206-443-2001. www.pacificsciencecenter.org. Open year-round Mon–Fri 9:45am–5pm (til 6pm Sat–Sun). Closed Tue Sept–May. $16, $11 children (ages 6-15).

Pacific Science Center
©John Keatley/Pacific Science Center

Grizzly bear, Woodland Park Zoo
©Ryan Hawk/Woodland Park Zoo

See All Chapters
Medium 9782067197558

The Northwest

Michelin Michelin Travel & Lifestyle ePub

The Northwest

 Hamburg

 Lüneburg

 Husum

 North Frisian Islands

 Helgoland

 Bremen

 Oldenburg

 East Frisian Islands

 Hannover

 Celle

 Wolfenbüttel

 Goslar

 Hildesheim

 Einbeck

 Hann. Münden

 Hameln

 Lemgo

 Münster

Hafengeburtstag festival, Hamburg

© www.mediaserver.hamburg.de / C. Spahrbier

The Northwest

This vast region forms a triangle between the windswept beaches of the North Sea, the dense forests of the Harz Mountains and the cycle-friendly expanses of the Münsterland with its moated castles. Aside from natural splendours, historical towns abound. Germany’s second-largest city, Hamburg, lures visitors with its cosmopolitan flair, maritime spirit and some of the country’s best nightlife. The red-brick architecture that dominates the north gives way to half-timbered gems in such pretty towns as Celle, Hameln and Goslar. Goslar is also a gateway to the Harz Mountains, a paradise for outdoor enthusiasts. Hiking, cycling and even skiing are all popular activities. If water is your element, head to the Frisian Islands for great surfing, swimming and sailing.

See All Chapters
Medium 9782067182042

For Kids

Michelin Michelin Travel & Lifestyle ePub

The Willamette’s loamy soil gives rise to a feast of foods that enrich the plates of the finest restaurants in Portland. The climate and soil are ideal for vineyards, and more than 500 wineries, mostly west of Interstate 5, draw visitors from around the world to wine-country tasting rooms. Charming small towns, bucolic countryside and farm stands provide additional reasons to stop and savor Oregon’s wine country.

A string of cities, including the state capital of Salem and the free-spirited town of Eugene, are situated along I-5, which runs north to south through the center of the valley. To the west, the forested Coast Range cradles the valley, and 30mi to the east, waterfalls plummet down mossy Cascade Range hillsides alongside wooded hiking trails whose vine maple trees turn crimson and orange in the fall.

SALEMa

The capital of Oregon is the state’s third-largest city (pop. 156,000). Salem traces its founding to 1840, when Jason Lee moved the headquarters of his Methodist mission to this mid-Willamette Valley location. Lee’s house and other early buildings still stand at the Willamette Heritage Center at the Millaa (1313 Mill St.; t 503-585-7012; www.willametteheritage.org; open year-round Mon–Sat 10am–5pm ;$6), a five-acre historical park that includes the 1889 Thomas Kay Woolen Mill. A millstream courses beneath the main mill building, and inside, massive looms operate with water-powered turbines. Four buildings, filled with period furnishings, were moved to this site, and are considered the oldest in the Northwest, dating to the 1840s.

See All Chapters
Medium 9782067182028

Tuscany and Umbria

Michelin Travel & Lifestyle Michelin Travel & Lifestyle ePub

Florence viewed from Piazzale Michelangelo
© Britta Jaschinski/Apa Publications

THE CITY TODAY

Florence has long depended on its legacy of the Renaissance to market itself, particularly to the millions of foreign tourists who swarm its streets and fill its coffers year after year. High prices and crowds have driven much of the native population to the suburbs. Some of the centre is closed to car traffic (Duomo and Santa Maria Novella) and major exhibits are now often held in outlying areas; an opportunity to see less explored districts and to once again rub shoulders with Florentines.

A BIT OF HISTORY

Italian genius flourished in Florence in a peacock display of brilliance. For three centuries, from the 13–16C, the city’s exceptional artistic and intellectual activity left its mark on civilisation throughout Europe. During the Renaissance, a receptivity to the outside world, a dynamic open-minded attitude, and funding lured inventors, men of science and art to re-interpret and even surpass the achievements of the ancient world.

See All Chapters

See All Slices