400 Slices
Medium 9780892727605

Settling Twice

Down East Books ePub

Deborah Joy Corey

I n Penobscot, Maine, I often travel a stretch of road similar to the one that ran past my childhood home in New Brunswick, Canada. It wanders the same easy way through scattered country houses, a Baptist church, abandoned barns, and a general store. On the southward stretch, I pass the tiny rectangular field like the one where my older brother Dana was shot on Halloween night, when he was twelve.

In Bangor, Maine, there is a replica of the five-story brick mental hospital where my maternal grandmother died. It has stacked, barred windows identical to those one of her daughters would stand in years after her mother

See All Chapters
Medium 9781608933914

Chapter 23

Bean, Leon Leonwood Down East Books ePub

Chapter 23

Fly Casting

Actually there is no such thing as fly casting. It’s the line that’s cast and not the fly. The fly simply rides along as a passenger. Keep this in mind and you will soon learn how to cast. In bait casting the lure carries out the line but in fly casting the line carries out the lure. »

BILL GORMAN > L.L.’s point about casting the line, with the fly along as the passenger, is a well-known one. But I love the quote, “Actually there is no such thing as fly casting.” It captures L.L.’s straightforward style perfectly.

The caster in Fig. 1 is ready to begin; Right foot forward, right thumb parallel on the handle; left hand grasping the line which lays out about thirty feet in front on the water.

Starting the back cast, the left hand is brought slightly back to straighten out the line and at the same time lift the rod slowly to the 10:00 A.M. position and without hesitation, “snap” the rod back to the 2:00 P.M. position still grasping the line in the left hand which now travels slightly up. The line has now left the water and is flying back in a wide arc. Give it time to go back straight as shown in Fig. 2.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781608933914

Chapter 10

Bean, Leon Leonwood Down East Books ePub

Chapter 10

How to Hunt Pheasants

Maine pheasant hunting is confined to the coastal counties, these birds being unable to withstand deep snow in the northern sections during the winter.

Like grouse, the pheasants are found in the farming sections and around the outskirts of villages. In many cases they frequent the same covers and it is not unusual to find pheasants in woodcock covers.

During the first part of the open season we look for them in fields and covers that contain seed plants or weeds. We also find them in gardens from which corn, beans and other foods have been harvested. They also feed on berries and apples but not to the extent that grouse do.

Later, after they have become wise to the ways of men, dogs and guns the birds are more likely to be found in thick cover and in softwoods. A cover so thickly grown with vines and bushes that it is nearly impenetrable will be a favorite hiding place for pheasants.

The State of Maine liberates four to five thousand mature pheasants every spring. These birds breed in the wild and produce flocks ranging from four to a dozen. In addition, the State liberates six to seven thousand nearly grown birds in the latter part of the summer. These supplement the wild stock and are available for hunting in the Fall. Although they are not so plentiful as grouse and woodcock there are enough pheasants in Maine to provide good sport. They are an added reason for late season grouse hunting since the open seasons run together the first two weeks in November.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780892727605

from The Road Washes Out in Spring

Down East Books ePub

Baron Wormser

W e resolved to build our house ourselves. Though my wife had studied architecture for a time and was a capable designer, the world of practical carpentry was a mystery to us. We knew what a two-by-four was and what a hammer was, but we didn

See All Chapters
Medium 9780892728060

Have you ever visited this part of the park?

Andrew Vietze Down East Books ePub

Let’s make it clear before you even get started that your answer is incorrect. Katahdin, you’re saying, plain as blueberry pie. And yes, that is the state’s highest peak, the Mountain of the People of Maine, the Greatest Mountain, terminus of the Appalachian Trail. The question, however, is this: What is the beautiful basin that affords this jaw-dropping view? A small pond now within the bounds of Baxter State Park, this place was the site of a turn-of-the-century sporting camp, and a dozen cabins still sit along the shore here. From the porches of several of these, you can look out at the long ridge of Barren Mountain, the rounded crown of the Owl, the deep cut of Witherle Ravine, and Katahdin’s magnificent Hunt Spur. Beautiful as the spot is, it hasn’t always been serene. Controversy has swirled around the pond in recent years, and the place was much in the news. That’s all quieted of late, and today the waters are placid once again. Have you ever visited this part of the park? Turn to page 98 to learn more about this stunning spot.

See All Chapters

See All Slices