431 Slices
Medium 9781904658498

16: A Tale of Two Clients: Images of Terapy

Daniels, Aaron B. Aeon Books ePub

[Author’s note: In the interest of respecting the ethical guidelines of the profession of clinical psychology, the portrayals below are complete fabrications. Although typical of encounters I have had as a psychotherapist, none of the events portrayed ever occurred as described. These are caricatures of two difer-ent types of session but with some common themes.]

He is crying — again. His tears stream easily and occasionally a near feral howl escapes his mouth between mufed whimpers. All I can see is the moussed, thinning charcoal hair on top of his head quivering with each sob. The first five or six times this happened, I was devastated.

I’m a failure. I’m a terrible therapist. I just bungle into these wounded parts of him like a bull in a china shop.

After repeated efforts to interpret and contain failed, I eventually abandoned my clinical training and tried to console, apologize, and even attempted to take back the offending comment. In short, I buckled. A therapist must be able to endure the pain of the client and address the source of the suffering. Otherwise, the client’s woundedness runs the session and turns the room into a reenactment of the pathology or trauma. This was, in part, what had happened over our first year or more of treatment.

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Medium 9781904658498

7: Pseudo-Neo-Gnostic-Anti-Teist-Anarcho-Romanticism: An Image Tat Made Sense at the Time

Daniels, Aaron B. Aeon Books ePub

The walls and ceiling of the dorm room display a riot of tempera paint and crayon creations. Cosmic wombs, serpents, and tangles of interlaced scribbles, mottos, and quotes play tricks of perspective in the golden glow of the candles and dim lamps. The soundtrack varies from Orf’s Carmina Burana to Nine Inch Nails to the Violent Femmes to that new band, Nirvana. In short, a flmmaker couldn’t do a better job of establishing an early 1990’s college campus unless somebody — oh wait, someone did just furtively light a joint.

The initial wave of partiers leaves around midnight and our numbers thin to four or fve. We shred a copy of the Communist Manifesto to wallpaper over parts of our postmodern cave paintings in preparation for room inspections in a day or two. I make sure whole pages come together to form a peace symbol. Others chuckle and somehow convey a sense of irony. The purple velveteen sound of Mazzy Star’s halcyon lilt oozes from the speakers, creating a strange sonic contact high.

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Medium 9781904658313

Queen of Disks

Chris Zalewski Aeon Books ePub

The Queen of Disks wears her emblem of a winged goats head above her crown, on her breast and knee guards. This relates tofertility and procreation, as does the goat beside her which is the influence of Capricorn in her nature. The sigil of her scale is a cube which she has on her throne, crown and sceptre. This cube represents the Salt of the Earth which is the stabilisation of things becoming and yet to become.

As Queen of the Gnomes she is present where there is any form of vegetation. It is here muddy waters that sustain and give life to the arid areas of lesser growth. She is the patroness of agriculture and is present in any such concept as a dam, or stream, where water is used as a Life Force to nurture the Earth.

In Egyptian mythology this position is taken by the Goddess Isis, wife of Osiris and mother of Horus. She was the one who searched for the scattered body parts of Osiris (after his battle with Set) and restored him to life. She was the Mother figure of the Egyptian Gods and was initially known as a Fertility and Agricultural Goddess. Gradually her fame increased and she presided over women's affairs. In Celtic mythology the Goddess Brigid (one of the triune Goddesses) was the daughter of Dadga. In one form she presided over healing and the making of weapons, farm implements (part of her duties as a Smith) and became the Goddess of fertility and poetry.

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Medium 9781904658313

King of Cups

Chris Zalewski Aeon Books ePub

The King of Cups has an eagle drawing his chariot and has a crest above his crown, on his breast and knee guards. This shows his airynature; swift and continuous though still above the water beneath him. The serpent issuing out from the cup relates to secretiveness and evil intentions, but is balanced with the lotus as a symbol of purity. The Scorpion on the rim of the wheel of the chariot shows the influence of the zodiac sign and the destructive influence in which he moves. The Sigil of the Scale is of four Scorpions tails in the form of a swastika, which relate to a negative influence that will one day sting him if he drops his guard. The four dots separating each tail from the one beside it are the checks and balances he has set for himself. Like all masculine figures in the Tarot court cards, he is winged.

The Egyptian mythological figure associated here is that of Hapimon (Hapi) who had the figure of a man and the breasts of a woman. He was a Cataract God where he poured water to both heaven and earth from his urns. When the Nile was low it was to Hapi that his devotees prayed to increase the Nile's water level, necessary for prosperity. The Celtic link here is to the Water God Nechtan, husband of Boann, whose function was to guard the sacred Well ‘Segais one, the source of all knowledge. In many respects he was allied to the Arthurian myth of Sir Gwain, for Nechtan was one of four who were cup bearers to the Well.

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Medium 9781904658368

CHAPTER THREE: I’m the urban shaman

Duncan Barford Aeon Books ePub

Space and time. Have you ever stopped to wonder what they are? Have you ever peered deeply into your experience and considered what they are like?

They lend a fundamental structure to our experience, but in trying to grasp what time and space are we can easily overlook the equally interesting question of what use is being made of them.

Where space and time connect with human consciousness there arise the notions of place and occasion. And what constitutes the content of our lives more than these? Our lives are a procession of places and occasions. As soon as we turn our attention to how experience takes this form, we start to realize how our lives are chopped up into places and occasions of different types, within which different rules of behaviour are applied.

It seems too obvious to be worth pointing out how we are expected to behave differently when driving on the motorway from how we behave when walking on a pavement. It even seems absurd to argue that the contrast between our behaviour in a school (say) and in a supermarket has any real significance. Surely, we simply have to educate our children and buy our food, so why wonder that society sets aside places and occasions for this? Yet, if we trouble ourselves to think about it, the institutions of our culture have no other means of manifestation than the way they dictate our usage of time and space. To question or challenge this usage is a powerful technique for changing both culture and our experience of reality.

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