2475 Chapters
Medium 9781475811537

The Inner Life of Transformation: A Philosophic Investigation of Leadership, Media, Justice, and Freedom

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

GLENN M. HUDAK

ABSTRACT: This article investigates the philosophical terrain of transformational leadership by first providing a phenomenology of school leadership within the context of a media-saturated environment. Second, the article investigates transformational leadership by comparing and contrasting leadership in Plato's Republic with leadership in postmodern America.

We live in an age of “transformation” where freedom to transform ourselves has become a cultural preoccupation at the expense of justice. As such, it is no mere coincidence that “transformation” should also become a prominent conceptual feature in leadership theory. This is not to suggest that research into transformational leadership is misguided. Rather, in this study I will focus on the construction of “transformation” within the contemporary social context, and especially within the context of the postmodern media environment. In my investigation I will differentiate between transformation that speaks primarily to our organizational needs—needs that pertain to our work lives—and “inner” transformation, transformation that awakens not only our inner, psychic, and spiritual lives but, more so, our moral impulse for justice. My aim is to bring into “ecological” balance the realities of our work lives with the necessities of our inner lives as they pertain to a meaningful process of transformation. Indeed, it is my contention that while noteworthy leadership studies address the importance of transformation within the organizational contexts of schools (e.g., Bennis, 1984; Burns, 1978; Quantz, Rogers, & Dantley, 1991), without proper attention to the inner life of transformation, our social, political, and organizational efforts may, in fact, be colluding with the dominant ideology rather than providing an oppositional frame that sets the stage to transform injustice to justice.

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Medium 9781475816730

Teachers’ Micropolitics and School Change in Vietnam

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Chi Binh Bui

ABSTRACT: The study describes and analyzes teachers’ micropolitics to serve two purposes: to understand how teachers make sense with the way change is led and to interpret if the way they make sense can influence the change process. This empirical study revealed the following: Teachers felt that their professional development was affected because of change tasks; the way they made sense as such would predictably determine the change process; teachers’ micropolitics was always played out in inseparable interaction with leadership; and the forms of teachers’ micropolitics and teachers’ seniority were surprisingly correlational.

This article first revisits two important concepts: the professional self and the subjective educational theory concerning micropolitics, which often occurs in various forms during school change implementation. These conceptual instruments are two components in teachers’ interpretative (cognitive) framework. Instrumentalizing them in practice is necessary for school leaders to spot teachers’ micropolitics and lead change. The article then presents the methodological underpinnings that guided my study—from study design to research question formulation, data collection, data analysis, and interpretation. Some basics of the study context are also mentioned to enhance the rich description of the data collected. What follows is an analysis of the results and discussion. I argue that, predicated on the analysis, educational research in micropolitics must be done in its interaction with leadership to adequately reflect educational realities. At the end of the article, I mentioned study limitations and recommend some issues for further research.

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Medium 9781475815986

Departments

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Peter McLaren

Peter: Your work interests me a great deal because it is decidedly transdisciplinary and intersects with a number of pertinent themes and issues that continue to be of singular importance in the struggle for economic, social and cultural justice. Let me begin by asking you a general question, Lisa. What, in your opinion, are currently some of the most pressing concerns for Asian Pacific Americans?

Lisa: That’s a question that has many answers, and answers that have many different conditions. If you segment out the larger Asian Pacific American population by ethnic groups, you will get a very different answer than segmenting this population by socioeconomic class or by gender. For some of the most recent immigrants, like the Vietnamese, issues of economic opportunities, bilingual education, and adequate social services are important. For more established groups, like many Chinese Americans or Japanese Americans, encountering “glass ceilings” in career advancement is an issue. Asian Pacific Americans are such a diverse group. Generational issues are also important.

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Medium 9781475816167

Reforming Russian Higher Education: Towards More Autonomous Institutions

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

OLGA BAIN

Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, 468 Baldy Hall, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260

Introduction

The radical changes of the post-“glasnost” period in Russia were brought about by her own people—well-educated and highly-trained—whose value, however, was not appreciated by the system. Being the product of the Soviet education (because and despite of this fact), they turned first of all to school with an eye to its transformation so as to enable the self-development of creative and responsible personalities. The major goals of the educational reform were conceptualized by the Temporary Research Collective VNIK) “School” and became part and the parcel of the 1992 Law on Education. The underlying principles of the state educational policy, as adopted from the 1992 Law on Education, Article 2, are the following: 1) humanism as actualized in a child-centered approach, commitment to universal values and the free development of personalities and citizens; 2) multiculturalism which pursues both integrity of the federal cultural and educational systems and protection of regional and ethnic cultural traditions; 3) secular character of the state and municipal educational institutions; 4) freedom and pluralism in education (implying choice of methods of teaching and teaching materials for teachers, choice of schools and programs for students and their parents, and overcoming dogmatism in general); 5) democratic principles of governance and autonomy of educational institutions.

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Medium 9781475836813

Pay for Progress

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Pay for Progress

The Relationship Between Florida Districts’ Teacher Salary Offerings and Their High School Dropout Rates

Henry Tran

David G. Buckman

ABSTRACT: While teacher effectiveness literature has suggested a potential promising relationship between test-score-based teacher quality and student test score based growth , the question of whether teachers can improve student dropout rates is not as well understood. Grounding our work based on theories that suggest higher salaries may attract better teachers, we utilize panel analyses on three years’ worth of data (2012–2014) to estimate the potential impact of Florida public school districts’ teacher offerings on their dropout rates. We define teacher salaries in three different ways: (1) districts’ average teacher salary, (2) teachers’ earning potential with a given level of education (i.e., bachelor’s and master’s degree holders) within the districts, and (3) districts’ salary-level offering. Our findings support the assertion that improved pay is positively related to lower student dropouts. This finding contributes significantly to the teacher quality, teacher salary, and the high school dropout prevention literature and has policy implications.

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