2408 Chapters
Medium 9781475843040

Coaching Principals for the Complexity of School Reform

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Chad R. Lochmiller

Coaching Principals for the Complexity of School Reform

ABSTRACT: This multi-case qualitative study describes how leadership coaches working in a university-based coaching program provided support to school principals in three urban elementary schools in the western United States. Drawing on qualitative data collected during a single school year, the study examines which issues leadership coaches prioritized and how they provided coaching support. A thematic analysis of the data produced four findings. These findings suggest that coaches focused their work on classroom instruction and adopted differentiated responses to support based on principal and school needs. The article concludes by discussing the implications for leadership preparation and school reform.

KEY WORDS: Leadership Coaching, Instructional Leadership, School Principals, Professional Development, School Reform

Urban school leaders face tremendous pressure to improve student achievement outcomes. Scholars have suggested leadership coaching as one of many strategies that may be helpful in supporting school leaders who engage in significant school reform efforts (Barnett & O’Mahony, 2008; Neufeld & Roper, 2003; O’Mahony & Barnett, 2008; O’Mahony, Matthews, & Barnett, 2009; Wise & Jacobo, 2010). Leadership coaching is distinct from instructional coaching, which is often used to support classroom teachers in acquiring more desirable pedagogical practices (Gallucci, Van Lare, Yoon, & Boatright, 2010) or creating coherence across instructional reforms (Woulfin & Rigby, 2017). In recent years, leadership coaching research has expanded, with empirical evidence demonstrating both the efficacy of leadership coaching approaches (Goff, Guthrie, Goldring, & Bickman, 2014; Grissom & Harrington, 2010) and providing descriptions of various leadership coaching approaches, models, and programs (Lochmiller, 2014; Silver, Lochmiller, Copland, & Tripps, 2009; Villani, 2005). A few scholars have spent considerable time investigating how leadership coaching might be effectively provided over a period of one to three years as part of an induction program designed for novice principals or as a form professional development designed for novice, mid-career, or veteran administrators (Lochmiller, 2014; O’Mahony & Barnett, 2008; Silver et al., 2009; Villani, 2005). Findings from these studies suggest that leadership coaching is not a static practice, but frequently evolves in response to the individual principal’s needs and school-based conditions (Lochmiller & Silver, 2010). As such, the evolutionary nature of leadership coaching support makes it ideal for leaders entering the unstable contexts of struggling urban schools. Indeed, leadership coaching may well enable principals to manage the internal and external factors influencing schools that initiate school-wide reform (Knapp, 1997; Marks & Nance, 2007).

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Medium 9781052684042

Superintendent Behaviors and Activities Linked to School Effectiveness: Perceptions of Principals and Superintendents

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

GLORIA GRIFFIN1

EDWARD W. CHANCE2

ABSTRACT: This article focuses on the behaviors, activities, and perceptions of superintendents in the creation of effective school districts. It also examines the principal’s perception of the superintendent’s role in leading a district to a state of effectiveness. School districts were viewed as macro social systems and school sites as micro social systems for purposes of this leadership study.

Excellence in public schools is high on America’s educational agenda. Across the nation, states are mandating school reform. Those chosen to lead schools as superintendents are challenged to develop progressive programs that will establish excellence in their school districts.

During the last half of the twentieth century, there has been an intensive search for effective schools; that is, schools that provide all students with a quality educational experience regardless of their background and socio-economic status (Berreth, 1991; Levine, 1991; Miller, 1983). Researchers have identified teachers’ high expectations, school climate, instructional focus, measurement of student achievement, and the role of the principal as instructional leader as effective schools correlates. The role of the principal as instructional leader has dominated the effective schools research findings (Bridges, 1982; Brookover and Lezotte, 1977; Edmonds, 1979; Edmonds and Frederiksen, 1979; Levine, 1991; Lezotte, Edmonds, and Ratner, 1974).

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Medium 9781475816242

The Killing Fields and the Necessity of Memory

International Journal of Educational Ref Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Interview of Juha Suoranta by Peter McLaren

I am a Finnish male born in 1966 and currently working as a professor of education at the University of Lapland, Finland. I am Anna Sofia’s father and Erja’s husband. In my academic life, I have worked with methodological questions in the educational and social sciences, with qualitative research methods (I have written an introductory book in Finnish on the subject), and recently with the questions of critical (media) pedagogy. My readings and experiences have led me to think of educational and methodological issues more and more as questions of politics and ideology, that they are political in nature.

I think that there is also a biographical factor to this progress. Therefore, I’d like to tell the following historical account. As you well know, we had a civil war in Finland in 1918. It was one of the bloodiest in the history of civil wars. The battle was between the right-wing “Whites” and left-wing “Reds.” My hometown, the city of Tampere, played a central role in the war and, in a way, my destiny—my pure existence—was determined in the final battle of Tampere. My great-grandfather, Anton Suoranta, participated in the Tampere battle on the side of the Reds. After the Whites had won and taken over the town, great-grandfather was taken as prisoner and quickly sentenced to death by firing squad.

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Medium 9781475819366

Illustrations of Engagement Styles: Four Teacher Candidates

Teacher Education and Practice Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

NORMA S. GUERRA

ABSTRACT: The inherent complexity of preparing future teachers and the associated high stakes upon graduation continue to motivate educators to examine how best to engage teacher candidates as students so that they will be skilled and adaptable once they become teachers. To this end, a new conceptualization of engagement styles is presented and illustrated in four case studies. Information about engagement styles is important because it provides the individual with a context with which to self-monitor one’s responses to distinct social–cognitive expectations. This article begins with a brief description of the literature pertaining to the development of engagement styles, which are identifiable as an assessed product of the LIBRE model problem-solving activity. Included is a discussion of the implications of the use of the LIBRE model for the preparation of future teachers, with explicit attention to the relationship to teacher identity development and how self-monitored engagement styles can assist novice teachers in the classroom.

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Medium 9781475816488

Reflections of Communal Understanding and Patterns of Modern Social Life in Traditional School Education in Turkey

International Journal of Educational Ref Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Kemal Duruhan

Contemporary traditional education understanding and applications have always been criticized in Turkey (Açıkgöz, 2002; Akyüz, 1993; Bilhan, 1991; Kaya, 1981; Sönmez, 2002). The characteristics of traditional education are the following: class-centered teaching and crowded classrooms, teacher-oriented education, intensive curriculum, traditional teaching methods, and verbal evaluation of student success. Criticism on such educational understandings and applications brought forth a desire to modify them. Modifications were successfully done in the written form of educational aims (Başaran, 1994). However, it was not possible to make the same ideal changes in the application process (Sönmez, 2002). Positive changes in the understanding and application of education have not been at desired levels, nor have they been common yet. The reasons for this can vary from economic and political to social and psychological. Each of the reasons has a role in the retardation of the changes. Yet the most important factor in the retardation process is, mostly, communal relations and the communal relationship style of Turkish society. Geographically, from the western part toward the eastern part and from the city toward the country, communal understanding of Turkish society has the following main indicators: group life (more than individual), social truth life (more than material truth life), verbal life (more than actional life), and hierarchical relations (more than horizontal relations).

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