379 Chapters
Medium 9781617452697

Using Acrylic Mediums

Wen Redmond C&T Publishing ePub

Mediums are fun to learn about and even more fun to use. Liquid and gel mediums can be used for gluing, as protective coatings, to add transparent overlays, to extend paints, to create medium lifts and skins, and to create papers and other experimental substrates to print on.

Some mediums are clear; some are opaque. They can be mixed with acrylic colors or other mediums. A group of specialty mediums contain small particles, such as glass beads, mica bits, lava, and more. Some will look different on white substrates than on painted or dark substrates. Mediums can even be used as resists.

You can sew substrates that have thin layers of mediums, but note that removing stitches may leave holes, similar to sewing on paper. Substrates with mediums may be ironed on a low or wool setting, either on the wrong side or covered with parchment paper or silicone release paper.

Test mediums on a surface similar to the one that you’ll use in your project. Apply with brushes, palette knives, plastic cards—whatever you have on hand. Different tools produce different effects and textures depending on the thickness of the medium. All the mediums covered in this chapter are washable with soap and water. Do not allow a medium to dry on your tools; it will make them unusable.

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Medium 9781617452697

Paper as a Substrate

Wen Redmond C&T Publishing ePub

Printing on paper provides another tactile texture for digital artwork that you can use in art quilts, too. There are many papers that you can print on—some papers need to be prepared for inkjet printing (see Pre-Coats for Digital Printing), and some are fine without.

TIP

Coating papers with liquid or gel medium makes them more durable for sewing.

TYPES OF PAPER

You can use any number of high-quality fine-art papers, rag papers, watercolor papers, or archival papers. Or use simple inkjet prints, found papers, craft papers, tissue papers, old book pages, scanned documents, text, or old letters. My emphasis, and preferred method of working, is to experiment and try interesting papers for unique, original, and personal results. Almost any paper will work for printing a photograph on—plain, painted, or collaged.

Experiment, explore, and make test samples to see what works for you.

Assortment of paper

Image printed on plain inkjet paper

Image printed on recycled musical score

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Medium 9781571203236

2. Getting Started

Judy Sisneros C&T Publishing ePub

Beyond the Reef, 64" x 74" Judy Sisneros, 2005.

The preparation for making this type of quilt is simple. Just cut some squares and rectangles from your focus fabric, along with strips of the focus and companion fabrics, and you are ready to sew! The cutting suggestions and guidelines that follow are for a typical wallhanging six blocks across and seven or eight blocks long. The block sizes are all based on multiples of 6". The size is about 45" × 51" or 57", including a 1¼" finished inner border and a 3" finished outer border. Projects begin on page 22.

Cutting Instructions

Always start with a new blade in your rotary cutter. It will save you time and headaches.

Before cutting the squares or rectangles, trim the selvage edge. Also, be sure to cut all pieces on the straight of grain; you don’t want bias edges.

Focus Fabric

1. Cut 2 squares 12½" × 12½", being careful not to cut both pieces from the same position on the fabric. These squares will be an important part of the design. (For example, do not have the same large flower in the same place in both squares.)

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Medium 9781617450457

Place Mats

Kim Schaefer C&T Publishing ePub

Ornament Table Topper

FINISHED BLOCK SIZE: 12˝ × 12˝ • FINISHED TABLE TOPPER SIZE: 40½˝ × 40½˝

Quilted by Diane Minkley of Patched Works, Inc.

Bring the festivities to the table with this fun pieced and appliquéd table topper.

Materials

•1¼ yards total assorted reds for pieced center

•1¼ yards green for outer border

•½ yard total assorted brights for ornaments

•⅛ yard black for ornament hangers

•1¼ yards paper-backed fusible web

•45˝ × 45˝ batting

•2⅝ yards for backing and binding

Cutting

Note: The pieces for each matching set of rectangles are listed together. Use 2 of each size for each block.

CUT FROM THE ASSORTED REDS

4 squares 2½˝ × 2½˝

8 rectangles 1½˝ × 2½˝ and 8 rectangles 1½˝ × 4½˝

8 rectangles 2½˝ × 4½˝ and 8 rectangles 2½˝ × 8½˝

8 rectangles 1½˝ × 8½˝ and 8 rectangles 1½˝ × 10½˝

8 rectangles 1½˝ × 10½˝ and 8 rectangles 1½˝ × 12½˝

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Medium 9781571205384

Triangles All Around

Alex Anderson C&T Publishing PDF

Wall/Crib: 40½˝ × 52½˝

Twin: 60½˝ × 80½˝

Queen: 80½˝ × 100½˝

materials

Yardages are based on 42˝-wide fabric.

Fabric

Wall/Crib

Twin

Queen

Fabric #1

⅞ yard

2 yards

2⅝ yards

Fabric #2

¾ yard

2 yards

2 yards

Fabric #3

1⅛ yards

2 yards

2⅝ yards

Fabric #4

1 yard

1¾ yards

2½ yards

Fabric #5

1 yard

1½ yards

2⅛ yards

Backing

46˝ × 58˝ (Use leftovers and supplement as necessary.)

66˝ × 86˝ (Use leftovers and supplement as necessary.)

86˝ × 106˝ (Use leftovers and supplement as necessary.)

Binding

Leftovers* or ½ yard

Leftovers* or ¾ yard

Leftovers* or ⅞ yard

Batting

46˝ × 58˝

66˝ × 86˝

86˝ × 106˝

* There will be enough left over to create a multifabric binding.

cutting

Write the fabric name on masking tape and attach it to each strip.

Wall/Crib

Fabric

Number of Strips*

Twin

Size of Pieces

Number of

Pieces

Number of Strips*

Queen

Size of Pieces

Number of

Pieces

Size of Pieces

Number of

Pieces

#1

2

10½˝ × 20½˝

4

4

15½˝ × 30½˝

4

4

20½˝ × 40½˝

4

#2

2

6½˝ × 40½˝

2

3**

10½˝ × 60½˝

2

4**

10½˝ × 80½˝

2

#3

3

10½˝ × 10½˝

8

4

15½˝ × 15½˝

8

4

20½˝ × 20½˝

8

#4

1

10⅞˝ × 10⅞˝

2 squares; cut in half diagonally to make 4 triangles

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