1227 Slices
Medium 9780874259193

ACTIVITY 10: Testing the Collaborative Waters

Peter Garber HRD Press, Inc. PDF

ACTIVITY 10:

Testing the Collaborative Waters

Purpose

To assess an organization’s readiness to collaborate

Description

Participants complete a Collaboration Readiness Questionnaire (CRQ).

Time

45 minutes

Resources

Handouts 10.1 and 10.2

Presentation

1. Introduce the activity by explaining that sometimes it is important to “test the waters before jumping in head first” into any initiative:

You may want to test the “collaborative waters” in your organization before moving forward.

It may be best to gradually introduce collaboration before starting a more involved collaborative process.

You need to be patient with those who might not be used to working in a collaborative work environment.

2. Distribute a copy of Handout 10.1 to each participant.

3. Explain that the purpose of the CRQ is to provide a measure to better understand how receptive an organization might be to the introduction of collaboration.

4. Handout 10.2 provides a scoring guide for participants to tally an overall Collaboration

Readiness Score for their organization.

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Medium 9781599961965

#44: What’s on First

Marlene Caroselli HRD Press, Inc. PDF

#44: What’s on First?

Overview:

To stimulate thinking about steps in a process, participants will first work on a short ordering exercise, followed by a flowcharting activity, based on input from a volunteer.

Objective:

To heighten awareness about processes and the factors leading to their improvement.

Supplies:

Time:

Copies of Handout #44-1

Transparency #44-1

Overhead projector

20–25 minutes

Advance

Preparation:

Make a copy of Transparency #44-1. Make copies of Handout #44-1 for onehalf the number of participants in the session. Half of the class will have Part

A of the handout and the other half will receive Part B.

Participants/

Application:

While this exercise works with any size group, too large a group might prevent those in the back of the room from seeing the work being done on the flipchart. With a large number of participants, seats could be arranged closer to the front for the second half of the exercise. Because the exercise usually provokes laughter, it makes an ideal warm-up. It also works as a session stimulator whenever the discussion focuses on work processes.

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Medium 9781599963525

Activity 11: Don’t Make an ASS of U and ME

Sue Bishop HRD Press, Inc. PDF

11

Don’t Make an ASS of U and ME

DESCRIPTION

OBJECTIVES

This activity focuses on assumptions, presumptions, and stereotyping, and how they can affect interpersonal relationships.

By the end of this activity, participants will:

• Realize that everyone makes value judgments

against arbitrary criteria.

• Recognize the range of criteria against which indi-

viduals can be assessed.

• Have begun to acknowledge areas where prejudg-

ment can result in unreasonable bias, prejudice, or discrimination.

• See that stereotyping and assumptions can alter our

opinions of individuals, which may sometimes affect communication, and interpersonal relationships can suffer as a result.

PARTICIPANTS

TIME

RESOURCES

6 to 20 participants; any type

1 to 2 hours

• Space and seating for full group discussion and for

three groups to work independently

• Flipchart paper and markers for group work

• Adhesive tape or other means of attaching flipchart

paper to wall

METHOD

AND NOTES

Step 1: Introduce the activity.

• This activity concerns assumptions and stereotyp-

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Medium 9781599961774

42. “Of course I know what a TEAM is! Do you?”

Jonamay Lambert HRD Press, Inc. PDF

“Of course I know what a

TEAM is! Do you?”

42

Eric Lynn, LCT Consultants 

Nürnberg, Germany 

Purpose 

This activity facilitates the team-building process by making differences obvious.

At the end of the session, participants will

• see how the idea of what makes a “team” varies across cultures;

• know that there is no one “right way” of working together;

• be in a position to define their principles for working together.

Target audience 

People who are or will be working together in international teams. With truly mixed multicultural groups, the activity can be used with as few as 4 to 12 people. Generally 12 to

50 or more is workable.

Time 

90 to 100 minutes

Materials and environment 

• Flipcharts and board markers at various points (stations) around the room so that each

subgroup has space in which to work and won’t interfere with the work of the neighboring group

• A large room with open space; tables are not required

• Chairs only during debriefing phases

Procedure 

1. Introduce the notion of team in relation to the participants’ presence at the event. Ask provocatively and rhetorically the question “Are you sure you really have the same understanding of team as your colleagues?” (3 minutes)

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Medium 9780874259452

Strategy #14 Just-in-Time Opportunities

Peter Garber HRD Press, Inc. PDF

Strategy #14

Relationship

+

Just-in-Time Opportunities

1. Know the

Customer

6. What’s in a Name?

11. Understand the

Customer’s

Needs

16. Creating

Buying Habits

21. Teamwork

2. Build

Rapport

7. Selling Up,

Down, All

Around

12. Empowering

Customers

17. Selling

Service

22. Adapting to Change

3. Honesty is the

Best Policy

8. Contingency

Selling

13. Cutting

Costs

18. Full-Service

Selling

23. Beating the

Competition

4. Understand the Customer’s

Perspective

9. Creating the Need

14. Just-in-Time

Opportunities

19. Global

Approach

24. Creative

Selling

15. Pull-Through

Sales

20. Value-Added

Sales

25. Worth the Price

5. Selling the

“Sizzle”

10. Having the Latest

Technology

Performance

+

Sales Strategy

Relationship–lower

Performance–moderate

Just-in-time concepts have become very popular in many business applications such as inventory control and delivery. Just-in-time means that the product or even service is provided at the exact time that it is needed by the customer. In this strategy, just-in-time as it applies to selling significantly affects your relationship with the customer only if it is not on time. Similarly, performance really becomes important to the customer only if it is late rather than just-in-time. The concept of just-in-time sales represents unique windows of opportunity to be of greater value to the customer.

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