University Of North Texas Press (113)
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Part V

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF
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Our Family Fishing Trips

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

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Page 183

OUR FAMILY FISHING TRIPS by L. R. McCormack

One of my fondest memories of my Coney family is the fishing trips. Fishing was one of the activities the Coney boys loved. The

“boys” were the four sons of Leon Josephus Coney and Ida

Augusta Hawkins Coney. Their farm was located about five miles southeast of Ladonia, Texas. Not only was fishing their favorite sport, but it also provided some good meals. Their fishing was not done with a rod and reel. They used seines, and “grabbled” for the fish. My dad, Lowell (Sheep), and his brother Roy Leon (Buster) were the only two of the boys who could swim. Being the two youngest boys, they had developed a close bond through the years.

Dad could hold his breath under water so very long that they sometimes wondered if he had drowned. Buster could dive deeper than Dad. between the two of them, they checked out each fishing hole for suitable fish—as well as for water moccasins that were living in those holes—and selected the holes they would fish. They had several places that they visited regularly.

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The Jetty

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

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10/6/11

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Page 203

THE JETTY by Randy Cameron

Port Aransas, that island town off the Texas mainland, is, of course, surrounded by water. But even that is not enough for some people.

They want to go farther than the edge. They want to go to the very end. And to those who do, the jetty is their route, a mile-long, twelve-foot wide stretch of old cement first constructed in 1940, and more recently widened, patched, and finally strengthened with

Volkswagen-sized blocks of Texas granite. The whole scene is a marvelous mixture of jumbled and jagged rocks, moss, kelp, wheeling gulls, and sea spray.

And fishermen. What an eclectic lot the jetty lures out upon it—especially, I think, on a mild December day of streaky, high cirrus clouds and little wind such as this. We see people of all ages and genders, some serious anglers, some semi-so, and some not at all.

Those are the ones content to watch and listen to the sea, catch some sun, check their bird books and just be a part of the relaxed, communal scene. Still others, like myself, and my wife and sevenyear-old son, try a little bit of it all.

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Part III

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574413205

Texas Menu 1835: Venison and Honey, Prairie Chicken, or Baked Fish

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

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10/6/11

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Page 319

TEXAS MENU 1835: VENISON AND HONEY,

PRAIRIE CHICKEN, OR BAKED FISH by Jerry Bryan Lincecum

The autobiography of Gideon Lincecum, my great-great-great grandfather, contains some remarkable accounts of hunting and fishing in unspoiled areas of Texas in 1835. Lincecum’s six-month exploration of Texas came about after a good many citizens of

Columbus, Mississippi, where he resided and practiced medicine, became interested in migrating to Texas. An emigrating company was organized late in 1834, and Lincecum was appointed physician to an exploring committee charged with traveling to Texas and bringing back a report. He and five other men left Columbus on

January 9, 1835, and crossed the Sabine River into Texas on February 3.1 The following excerpts from Lincecum’s autobiography are among many that describe encounters with wildlife in Texas. In

1848, Lincecum moved his family to Long Point, Washington

County. His memoirs were written when he was an old man, and most of his accounts of hunting and fishing were first published in

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Quarry Books (28)
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13 Highway 61 Revisited

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Game day arrived, and an unusually agitated Roy Allen stood in the doorway to Pete Gill’s office. “Pete, now you’ve really lost your mind! Hitchhiking home from Spurgeon? It’s nuts!”

Pete was studiously shuffling through a stack of index cards. He glanced up expressionless, then resumed the shuffling. “Did you see the looks on the boys’ faces, Roy? I think I got ’em stirred up.”

“I’m not worried about that. We will win the game,” Roy said. “As bad as we looked the other night, Spurgeon is likely to be several degrees worse. And if we play better, which is a real possibility, then it’s you and me I’m worried about, Pete.”

Pete did not look up. “Take it easy, Roy.”

“Listen, Pete, Spurgeon is thirty miles away. And there’s no direct route between here and there. You have to take a bunch of different roads. Hitchhiking so late at night is—well, it’s no simple matter.”

“I’m going to start Stan Klem,” Pete said, lifting out one of the cards. “Don’t you think he looked the best of what we got?”

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28 Invasion of the Little Green Men

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

On Saturday, March 16, 1963, the sun did not rise on southern Indiana. Instead, the sky grew incrementally less dark, mutating from a tarry black into a deep charcoal, then finally transforming into an unbroken medium gray, revealing low-hanging nimbus clouds that scored the land with a diluvial mid-March rain. At the Esquire Motel, Pete and Roy raised the boys for breakfast at nine AM. Beneath an umbrella outside the Merry-Go-Round, Roy put a quarter in the newsstand for the morning edition of the Courier.

The front page of the sports section featured the five Spuds starters staring at readers from center page, as photographed by Bill Adkins the night before on the motel room bed. Roy’s amusement disappeared when he noticed the subheading of the “Sew It Seams” column, beneath the byline of veteran sports editor Dan Scism. It read, “Invasion by Ireland.”

“What are we?” he muttered. “Little green men from Mars?” After scanning the column, he handed the paper grimly to Pete. “Read what the Grand Poobah has to say about us.”

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5 Turkey Run and the White Horse Tavern

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Pete Gill shoved his way through the front door of his rented bungalow on the edge of the little town of Marshall, Indiana. “Glenda! I’m home!”

“Daddy!” Four-year-old Ellen came running to her father.

“Hey, my little darling! How was your day?” Pete swung his daughter up into his arms and gave her a loving kiss on the cheek.

“I found a shamrock, Daddy!” Ellen revealed a single shaft of clover in her small palm.

“You did! Well, that’s our good luck charm, honey. Hold on to that! We’re gonna need it! Where’s your little brother?”

“Joey’s sleeping.”

“That’s good.”

Pete’s wife, Glenda, appeared at the kitchen door. “So soon?”

Pete pecked Ellen again and set her down to run back to her room. “Don’t lose that shamrock, baby!” Pete kept his eyes away from his wife’s. “I quit, Glenda,” he mumbled.

His wife stared at him, dumbfounded. “Aw, Pete! Are you crazy? Not again!”

“I’m out. Done with it.” Pete dropped his body onto the couch.

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12 Soap and Towel and Wings of Fire

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

A week before the team’s season opener against Spurgeon, Pete had Jim Roos announce to students, parents, and public that there would be what he termed a “Soap and Towel” game, an exhibition scrimmage among Ireland players, Tuesday night prior to the Spurgeon game.

“But, Coach, this is nuts,” Dave Small pointed out. “We haven’t even scrimmaged full-court yet.”

“When I want your opinion, Small, I’ll ask for it.”

Dave said no more, but he could not imagine how the drills they had been doing in practice would translate into game conditions. His worst fear was an embarrassment in front of the whole town, but Pete would not be dissuaded. Pete wanted a show, a demonstration before all his detractors of what he was building. He overestimated, however, the readiness of his team.

Such an exhibition was a first for the town of Ireland. It was Pete’s idea that anyone could gain admission with a bar of soap or a towel, which he intended to stockpile for the team’s locker room supplies. Although hardly anyone expected to see high-quality basketball at the practice game, there was a great deal of curiosity about the team as tales of Pete’s bizarre and brutal practices had spread among townsfolk and even beyond. When Jack Brandt, sports director for Jasper radio station WITZ, heard about the game, he made plans to be there. Jasper athletic director Cabby O’Neill, on the other hand, decided it would be best not to attend, lest he be confused for an Ireland supporter, but he asked Jack to provide him with a full report on “this fellow Gill.”

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21 Walk Like a Man

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Pete Gill was more on edge about Winslow than he let on to anyone, except perhaps Roy Allen. He and Roy had scouted the Eskimos in a loss against Huntingburg, 61–54, one of only two victories for the Hunters all year. But Winslow was a young team, with no seniors and a squad made up almost entirely of volatile juniors, featuring good speed and streaky shooting skills. If the shots started to fall, they gained confidence with each basket. In Pete’s nightmares, the Eskimos would get hot, the Spuds would go cold, and his dream season would be shot dead in a humiliating flash the very first game of the tournament.

Adding to his worries, on Thursday the Spuds received unexpected and unwelcome word that Allen Voelkel would be unavailable for the Sectional. For several days he had been complaining of severe back pain and fatigue. Perplexed and frustrated, he and his father went first to a chiropractor, who told them the problem was not Allen’s back. Then a Jasper MD examined him and found albumen in his urine. Not a good sign.

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Indiana University Press (69)
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5. Special Service

Abraham Aamidor Indiana University Press ePub

Word of Alabama’s clash with the Texas A&M Aggies in the upcoming Cotton Bowl dominated the front sports page of the Nevada State Journal on Dec. 2, 1941. But it was an item running down the left side that garnered more attention from a core group of basketball enthusiasts in Reno that day. The brief story hailed a clinic at the University of Nevada gymnasium the night before conducted by Chuck Taylor, America’s “ambassador of basketball” and veteran of the best early professional cage teams. A photo showed Chuck in tight-fitting shorts and leather knee pads, plus his own brand of black Converse Chuck Taylor All Star shoes. Forty years old at the time, the 6-foot-1 ex-forward had a deeply receding hairline and was starting to carry a paunch, but he could still rouse interest in the 400 fans who showed up at the Nevada gymnasium, and he could still do free throws from behind his back and dozens of trick passes no youthful defenders could ever seem to stop.1

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6. Air-Tecs

Abraham Aamidor Indiana University Press ePub

Chuck Taylor was sitting on a narrow bench in the cavernous, tile-lined fieldhouse at Wright Field, Ohio in early December 1944, watching his “boys” go through an early evening workout and jawing with a local newspaper reporter. John Mahnken, who not long before was the 6-foot-8 starting center on the Georgetown University Hoyas, “dripped sweat” as Taylor continued sitting on the bench in his birch-colored sweat pants and shirt and egged on Mahnken and the other young basketball stars.

“Lt. Charles (Chuck) Taylor cast a quick glance at Mahnken,” the reporter wrote, “and the rest of the basketball players who were rounding out the first scheduled practice of the Air-Tecs, the quintet which will represent the Air Technical Service Command this year against professional, collegiate, and service teams. ‘They’re getting tired,’ he grinned. A minute later he called his team together. ‘That’s enough for today. You can shoot baskets for a while if you want, but we’ll meet here tomorrow same time. Okay? See you tomorrow night.’

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8. “Me”

Abraham Aamidor Indiana University Press ePub

John Wooden sat in a cramped den in his suburban Los Angeles condominium where he has lived thirty years, in a room crowded by an old sofa and recliner, at a desk buried beneath mounds of correspondence, and just under a wall plastered with photos of all his UCLA championship basketball teams. It’s not that Coach Wooden dwells on the accolades and all the old titles. It’s just that this is how his late, beloved wife Nell, a fellow Hoosier from southern Indiana he met at Martinsville High School, decorated the room, and that is how the room will remain until the end. Unseen in this living history museum, though, behind several autographed leather basketballs on one shelf and yet more trophies and other mementos on another, are the indelible tracks of all the other early Hoosier basketball legends that Wooden says enriched his life, and America’s, because of their love for the game of basketball, such as Everett Case, Ward “Piggy” Lambert, Tony Hinkle, Charles “Stretch” Murphy, and many others. One of those men was Chuck Taylor, a man Wooden first saw when Chuck put on a little clinic for the Artesians—that was Martinsville High School’s nickname, after a flowing well in the town—and the two men became fast friends years later, after Wooden moved to Los Angeles in 1948 and Chuck followed suit in 1950. The two lived mere blocks away from each other for seven years. “I had a lot of fun with Chuck,” Wooden reminisced. “I think maybe we enjoyed being hicks from Indiana, small towns in Indiana. We were Hoosiers. We had a lot in common and I think we were more comfortable than we would be with a lot of others, whether it was other basketball coaches or people in other areas.”

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4. The Invisible Pass

Abraham Aamidor Indiana University Press ePub

The Great Depression spelled doom for some, opportunity for others. For Chuck Taylor, it was the time of his life. Marquis Converse had lost his company in 1928 after it went into receivership. The company’s failure was linked to an ill-fated effort to market an automobile tire, the “Converse Cord,” which had high production costs, a high failure rate, and many returns from local dealers.

Mitchell B. Kaufman, president and owner of the Hodgman Rubber Co. in Framingham, Massachusetts, bought the firm in 1929, but he sold it to the Stone family—Joseph, Harry K., and Dewey D. Stone—in 1933. The Stone family ran the business for the next thirty-nine years, but in spirit, and in the public’s mind, it was to be Chuck Taylor’s company from then on.

Chuck’s secret was in sales and promotion. Years of touring with the Converse All-Stars basketball squad, making “special appearances” on local hoops teams and glad-handing customers in small-town sporting goods stores, plus his growing number of basketball clinics, were making Chuck a celebrity, albeit a faux celebrity. Converse revamped everything beginning in 1932 to revolve around their new star. The annual Converse Basketball Yearbook, begun in 1922 and enlarged and expanded in 1929, soon began promoting Chuck’s clinics, complete with endorsements from top coaches of the day. Beginning in 1932, Chuck’s name was added to the ankle patch of the All Star shoe for the first time. His well-regarded College All-American picks began that year as well, next to a smiling mug shot that was to become a signature piece over the years. As if to an increasing drumbeat, Chuck was exclusively touted as a veteran of the great pre–modern era basketball teams, as well as an authority who personally knew the top coaches and best players across the country.

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3. Salesman

Abraham Aamidor Indiana University Press ePub

Akron may have been a watershed in Chuck Taylor’s playing days. Firestone and Goodyear basketball continued to prosper, but Chuck was not part of it. After leaving the Non-Skids, he moved to Detroit and joined teams supported by first the Dodge Brothers, the famous automobile manufacturers, then by the T. B. Rayl Company, a large sporting goods retailer in the city. What Chuck had learned in Akron, besides some pointers from Sheeks and skills gained in competitive play, was the art of self-promotion. The Akron Beacon Journal covered Firestone and Goodyear basketball well, and the local factory boys were treated like real stars. Chuck took a few newspaper clippings and that rooftop photo of him in a Firestone uniform and made himself out to be a celebrity when he arrived in Detroit. The game plan? Reinvent himself.

First, he wangled a small story in one of the Detroit papers in late 1921 after he joined the Dodge Brothers factory team. Taylor “is generally regarded here as the smartest handler of the ball seen in a local uniform in some years,” the short item proclaimed, accompanied by that rooftop photo of Chuck in the Firestones’ jersey.1 The move to the Rayls was even more provident. The Rayls often traveled to other midwestern cities, including in Indiana and Wisconsin, and claimed a “Midwest championship” in 1919. They also made a couple of appearances in Fort Wayne, where Chuck might first have heard of them.2 Chuck may have worked on the assembly line for Dodge during the day, and he most likely sold athletic goods for Rayl. As both company teams were sponsored, Chuck would have worked and/or played ball on salary—a security blanket that was to become increasingly important to him later in life.

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Berrett Koehler Publishers (9)
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7 Reframing from Failure to Learning Moment

Peterson, Rick; Hoekstra, Judd Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Baseball teaches us how to deal with failure. We learn at a very young age that failure is the norm in baseball and, precisely because we have failed, we hold in high regard those who fail less often—those who hit safely in one out of three chances and become star players.

—FAY VINCENT, former Commissioner of Baseball

I met Garry Ridge, President and CEO of the WD-40 Company, about ten years ago after he spoke at The Ken Blanchard Companies’ client conference. During that conference, Garry shared the concept this chapter was named after—learning moments. Since that time, I’ve had the good fortune to speak with Garry on a few occasions. Most recently, Garry shared with me how he improves his own performance as well as the performance of the larger WD-40 Company “tribe” by reframing.

It started when I looked at WD-40 in the late 1990s. We were seeking to grow from $90 million to $400 million in revenue. I thought about what could keep us from hitting our growth targets. From my perspective, it boiled down to one thing—fear.

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3 Reframing from Trying Harder to Trying Easier

Peterson, Rick; Hoekstra, Judd Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

You don’t get paid by the hour. You get paid by the pitch; the fewer, the better.

—RICK PETERSON

From the time we were young, we’ve learned from parents and coaches, “It’s not enough to give 100 percent; you need to give 110 percent!” As a result, when we find ourselves stuck in a pressure-packed situation, many of us believe the best way out is to try harder.

Despite what we’ve been taught, at crunch time trying harder rarely works. Many examples, across a number of fields—athletic, military, and business—show that trying harder under pressure is counterproductive. Think about your best performances. Were you grinding and full of anxiety? I’m guessing no. More than likely, you remember your best performances as being almost effortless. These performances are often described as being “in the zone.”

Instead of trying harder when you’re under pressure, a better approach to getting in the zone is to “Try Easy!”1

We often try harder under pressure because we have some performance-limiting beliefs. For example:

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4 Reframing from Tension to Laughter

Peterson, Rick; Hoekstra, Judd Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Always go to other people’s funerals, otherwise they won’t come to yours.

—YOGI BERRA

All other things being equal, a performer who is tense loses to a performer who is relaxed. We all know we need to relax under pressure, but we don’t know how. In fact, when we’re told to relax and have fun, this often frustrates us and makes us even tenser. Why? Because we don’t know how to relax when we’re under pressure.

Let me offer up a solution. In your tensest moments, actively seek opportunities to laugh. There is something about laughter that makes threats less daunting and opportunities more visible.

In this chapter, Rick and I will coach you on how to use humor as the best antidote to tension. I will also share a number of examples of Rick and others using humor to relieve tension and move forward in difficult situations. Humor is more than a nice-to-have; it’s a must-have. Not just because it’s fun, but because it works.

Andrew Tarvin is the chief humorist at the company he founded, Humor That Works. He is not what pops into my head when I think of a humorist. For one, he is not a comedian. He graduated with a degree in computer science and engineering from The Ohio State University. Before founding Humor That Works, Andrew worked as a successful international information technology (IT) project manager at Procter & Gamble. He said, “As an engineer, I find what works, I do it, and then I teach it to other people. It turns out humor works.”1 But how does it work?

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1 Reframing—The Shortest Path from Threat to Opportunity

Peterson, Rick; Hoekstra, Judd Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door.

—MILTON BERLE

At its core, reframing describes the skill of consciously and intentionally thinking about a situation in a new or different way. This, in turn, allows us to shift the meaning we attach to the situation, the actions we take, and the results we achieve. The operative word in our definition is skill. In other words, it’s not something some are gifted with and others are not. With practice, reframing can be learned by anyone.

reframe [ri: ‘ freım]

The skill of consciously thinking about a situation in a new or different way to change how you interpret the situation, the actions you take, and the results you achieve

Blanchard Executive Coach Kate Larsen shared the following analogy with me to describe how reframing works.1 You hop into your car and start the engine. The radio is already on and is playing a song on one of your preset stations. The song is like the voice in your head (a.k.a. your self-talk), often filled with emotion. The preset station is the equivalent of a long-held assumption or belief.

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B Try This

Peterson, Rick; Hoekstra, Judd Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

The “Try This” sections that appear at the end of each chapter are combined here to guide you through getting started with reframing during crunch time.

Identify a high-pressure situation you’re facing now or will be facing in the near future (e.g., completing a big project with an impending deadline, making an important presentation to a challenging audience, performing in a game or a recital, taking a final exam). Use this situation as the context for practicing the skill of reframing as you read this book.

Write down what you’re currently thinking and feeling about your high-pressure situation.

Are you seeing it as a threat or an opportunity? If a threat, come up with two ways to think about it as an opportunity.

If you can already see the opportunity, write that down.

Using the high-pressure situation you identified in Chapter 1, walk through and capture notes regarding the first two steps of the reframing process.

Pause and recognize your Caveman’s story. Do I want to think or feel this way?

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