Texas A M University Press (10)
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1. Introduction

Rudolph A. Rosen Texas A&M University Press ePub

Standing near the former president of the United States was a tall, handsome African dressed in a blaze of traditional Maasai red. Barely 20 years old, the young man was the son of a chief and in time would become a chief in his African homeland. But he was not with the former president because of politics or tribal status. He was a student whose education was being funded at a leading university in South Africa by members of the audience. He was among the “motivational elements” assembled at this international nonprofit organization’s premier fundraising event where more than 15,000 members had assembled for four days of fun and fundraising.

At one of the event’s several formal dinners, to be followed by a major auction, members heard the young African speak of his dedication to the cause of wildlife conservation. They listened intently as he told of his commitment to take what he had learned from members of the organization during his visit and go back to his country to use his new knowledge as a leader. The members were enthusiastic and renewed their commitment to fund education of young Africans at African universities.

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2. Why Hold an Event?

Rudolph A. Rosen Texas A&M University Press ePub

I had just completed a strategic planning process involving board members and staff, and the president had finished studying the strategic plan. He was not one to read a lot or put up with much process. He usually knew what he wanted and was known for getting things done, regardless of what might stand in the way. The plan included a series of goals, objectives, and actions to turn the organization around. Turnaround was among reasons I was hired. Problems left unsolved, lack of professional management of personnel, legal action against the organization, underperforming fundraising, bickering among staff and volunteers, and worse plagued the organization. The plan dealt with these problems.

So I asked the president, “Where do you want to start?”

He replied, “We need to do them all.”

I agreed and added, “We can’t do them all at once, there is too much to do, and some things need to be done before we can start others.”

He was insistent. “All are important; we need to do them all and do them all now.”

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3. The Secret to Successful Event Fundraising in Good Times and Bad

Rudolph A. Rosen Texas A&M University Press ePub

The economy cycles from good to bad and so does fundraising success for organizations that fail to discover the secret to successful event fundraising in good times and bad. One such organization helped pioneer effective auction-event fundraising techniques and, in so doing, built one of the largest nonprofit wildlife habitat conservation organizations in the nation. But when the economy faltered, their fundraising did, too. This organization failed to use more recession-proof techniques in auction-event fundraising discovered by other organizations with similar missions. Top-level staff responsible for event fundraising in this organization aggressively prevented anyone from bringing in ideas from outside their ranks. The only ideas for recovery had to be theirs and theirs alone.

Although their auctions always carried some “recession-proof” items, staff analyzing fundraising success just didn’t seem to understand the difference between fundraising in good times and bad. The organization’s auctions were loaded with items people didn’t really need, and probably didn’t want. These items produced decent revenue during good economic times, and even in the worst of times the items sold. I ascribe that to the dedication of the organization’s supporters and volunteers who, in their desire to shore up the organization, felt they had no option but to bid on items they really didn’t need or want. But there are only so many people willing to do that and for only so long, even in good economic times. So attendance, dollar spent per attendee, and revenue started a long downward slide that accelerated as the economy declined.

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4. Organizing for Success

Rudolph A. Rosen Texas A&M University Press ePub

This is a tale of two fundraising legends, each located in a coastal state but a continent apart. Both worked for chapters of the same organization. East and West, the chapters for which our legends worked thrived. With the blessing and oft-stated awe of chapter leadership, these two individuals assumed full responsibility for the annual fundraising events. Year after year, our legends managed the events from A to Z. Both worked hard and were successful. But that’s where the similarity ended.

Our legend in the East took control of the event in the most literal sense imaginable. He chaired every committee. He did every job he possibly could by himself. And in the few instances in which an activity was assigned to another, our legend chose his closest friends. Each assignment was divided into the most minute division of labor. The workers were expected to report progress or completion to our legend, then await the next assignment. There was no question that this was the legend’s fundraiser.

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Nonprofit Resources for Nonprofits

Rudolph A. Rosen Texas A&M University Press ePub

The following nonprofit organizations, media, and agencies provide support and offer resources such as books and training to support nonprofit organizations’ fundraising and other essential functions, for example, board support, membership, administration, and general management.

Alliance for Nonprofit Management, San Francisco, CA
http://www.allianceonline.org

American Society of Association Executives, Washington, DC
http://www.asaecenter.org

Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action, Indianapolis, IN
http://www.arnova.org

Association of Fundraising Professionals, Arlington, VA
http://www.afpnet.org/

The Center on Philanthropy & Public Policy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
http://cppp.usc.edu

Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN
http://www.philanthropy.iupui.edu

The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Washington, DC
http://philanthropy.com

Council on Foundations, Arlington, VA
http://www.cof.org

Dorothy A. Johnson Center for Philanthropy, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI
http://www.gvsu.edu/jcp/home-45.htm

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Indiana University Press (100)
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Medium 9780253014429

10 GONGOs in the Development of Health Philanthropy in China

Jennifer Ryan Indiana University Press ePub

Deng Guosheng and Zhao Xiaoping

In China, the philanthropic and nonprofit sector is unique and distinctive. The nongovernmental organizational (NGO) landscape in China is largely divided into two groups—government-linked and independent NGOs—the latter of which ranges from grassroots to international organizations. The distinction between the two is based on whether government or civil society has started the organization and, thus, controls its governance and operations (Wang and Liu 2004). Government-organized nongovernmental organizations, or GONGOs, dominate China’s NGO and philanthropic landscape.

GONGOs are not unique to China and are found around the world, although they may be more prevalent in socialist countries transitioning to a market economy, like the former Soviet satellite states (Young 2004). Often, they are seen as “extended arms of the government” (Wu 2002) or considered in opposition to “legitimate civil society.” Among some groups, GONGOs may be viewed with suspicion as “nothing but agents of governments that created and funded them” (Moisés 2007). Yet nonsocialist countries also have government-linked bodies that are widely considered to be part of the nonprofit sector, such as the Japan Foundation, the British Council, the International Center for Human Rights and Democratic Development in Canada, and the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) in the United States. These organizations were founded or encouraged by the government, receive government funding, and are usually legally registered as charitable organizations in their home countries.

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10 - Myth vs. Reality: Muslim American Philanthropy since 9/11

Thomas J Davis Indiana University Press ePub

Muslim American Philanthropy since 9/11

Shariq A. Siddiqui

THERE ARE DEFINING moments in our lives. I remember my parents describing the moment they first heard that John F. Kennedy was assassinated and when my professors talked about the moment Martin Luther King, Jr., or Robert Kennedy was killed. I was amazed by their memory and used to be thankful that such an event had not occurred in my generation's lifetime. That changed on September 11, 2001.

As I watched the horrific images on television, praying that the perpetrators were not Muslims, I knew that this moment was significant, but I did not realize that it would be a defining moment for Muslim Americans. The lives of Muslim Americans were changed in profound ways on that day. Many have argued that the events that followed due to the tragedy of 9/11 have had a negative effect on Muslim Americans and especially their philanthropic activity. In order to understand the impact on Muslim American philanthropy after September11, 2001, it is important first to understand Islamic philanthropy, learn about Muslim American history, and explore who Muslim Americans are before looking into their philanthropic activities.

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10. Wednesday, June 1, 2011 Celebrating Quite a Life

Bob Hammel Indiana University Press ePub

Ten

Left was one final chance for Bloomington, Indiana University, so very many from his many interests, to say the final thank you they wanted to express.

On June 1, a month and a half after Bill Cook’s death, in the stately Indiana University Auditorium late on a Wednesday afternoon, his remarkable 80-year life was duly and formally and joyfully and at times tearfully celebrated.

The program’s unscheduled star was 17-month-old Eleanor, who scrambled up a formidable set of stairs and toddled on-stage as her father was speaking and praising her grandfather. It couldn’t have been better scripted. In mid-talk, Carl glanced to the side to see his surprise visitor approach, greeted her with “Oh, hi, Eleanor!” and, with a smiling, one-armed swoop, picked her up. That was the charming page one picture that spotlighted the Herald-Times coverage of the event: child in arm as Dad spoke.

Totally unplanned,” Gayle Cook calls that part of a special evening. “Marcy and I were in the front row on the far right, and the steps are on the far left of the stage. Marcy had Eleanor standing in front of her. She’d wander out a little, then she’d turn around and come back—she wasn’t going to leave Marcy. Then she started walking, and I thought, ‘I could grab her, but if I do, she might scream.’”

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10 Woods Hole, MBL, and the Pursuit of Cancer

Alexander W. Clowes Indiana University Press ePub

The Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole is a paradigm, a human institution possessed of a life of its own, self-regenerating, touched all around by human meddle but constantly improved, embellished by it. The place was put together, given life, sustained into today’s version of its maturity and prepared for further elaboration and changes in its complexity by what can only be described as a bunch of people. Neither the spectacularly eminent men who have served as directors down through the century nor the numberless committees by which it is seasonally raddled, nor the six hundred-man corporation that nominally owns and operates it, nor even the trustees, have ever been able to do more than hold the lightest reins over this institution; it seems to have a mind of its own, which it makes up in its own way.

Lewis Thomas, The Lives of a Cell

IF YOU COCK YOUR right elbow and let your hand curl upward, the shadow of the arm falls neatly on the map of Cape Cod. Woods Hole, located at the tip of the elbow, has one of the few deep-water harbors between New York and Boston, and it is the jumping-off point for Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket, as well as the Elizabeth Islands, which stretch to the southwest. In centuries past, it sheltered ships traveling eastward inside the Nantucket shoals. Its denizens, not so numerous as those in the outlying islands, made their livelihood from farming and fishing. On the British Admiralty charts of the region published in 1776 by DeBarres, only ten houses were located in Woods Hole, all of them at the head of Little Harbor, while in Chilmark and other villages on the Vineyard there were a great many more. For a very brief period in the nineteenth century (1820–1864), the seafarers of Woods Hole built ships and engaged in whaling.

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11 The Duchess, the Doc, and the Boys

Alexander W. Clowes Indiana University Press ePub

THE DECISION TO LEAVE Buffalo and to move to Indianapolis in the fall of 1919 was straightforward for Alec but difficult for Edith. Buffalo had been her home forever. Her children had been born there (Alexander in 1911, George in 1915, and Allen in 1917), and her widowed father and her friends lived nearby. Before Edith and Alec were married and when confronted with the possibility of a move, she had stated in no uncertain terms that she preferred to live in another city in America than to emigrate to England. Alec had thought it might be necessary to return to East Anglia to help run the family company, but as the Great War drew to a close, it was clear that everything had changed. Alec’s sister and parents were dead, and the opportunities for a career in business in England were increasingly uncertain.

The situation in Buffalo was similar. The state funding for the laboratory fluctuated from year to year, and the direction of the research program was shifting. Clowes was not in accord with Gaylord and realized that he needed to find other employment, preferably in the United States. He was elated by the possibilities at Lilly in Indianapolis. He had found the perfect job, a mix of basic and applied research in an organization that approved of what he wanted to do and paid him a living wage. With Eli Lilly in attendance, Clowes became an American citizen on January 8, 1921.

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Berrett Koehler Publishers (43)
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Medium 9781576754795

10: Growth versus focus: EXPANDING SENSIBLY

Kevin Lynch Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

For most economists and business leaders, a single word defines success: “growth.” At the very heart of the state religion that is our NSE-dominated economic system is a fundamental article of faith that states that gross national product (and its variants) must continuously increase.

In turn, the income statements and balance sheets of businesses must grow as well. Indeed, only through continuous growth can the relentless hunger of ownership be sated. As we proposed at the outset, the need for social enterprise—the very market opportunity, if you will—is borne in response to the fundamental social ills that are the unfortunate result of the single-minded focus on growth above all. If businesses were no longer driven, in their quest for continual growth, to offload true costs onto society as a whole, there would be fewer environmental problems for Seventh Generation to reverse, less generational poverty for Rubicon to redress, fewer human-rights abuses for Benetech’s software to track, and less pressure on the rainforest for Guayaki to preserve.

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10 Social Impact Measurement Maturity

Marc J. Epstein Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Ultimately, the goal of performance measurement is to increase your impact. The most effective way to do this is through careful measurement and management of your organization’s projects. If your social impact measurement system is mature, it can provide you with a better understanding of how you are investing your resources and the specific results they are producing. And it can provide the information you need for careful and dynamic management of activities that is responsive to outcomes, needs, and changes in the environment. In this chapter, we introduce a five-level model that you can use to describe and evaluate your current social impact measurement system and to generate ideas about how you could improve that system.

Our model, shown in Figure 23, uses a stepwise or maturity-stage format that highlights the characteristics of impact management systems. The model has five categories, which represent general profiles of organizational capability, though your organization may find it has characteristics of two or more levels. Organizations usually move through the levels as they become more experienced in evaluating impact and in using this information to make decisions. Each level encompasses the capabilities of all the categories below that level.

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11 Amplifying Your Impact

Marc J. Epstein Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of your organization is the key to maximizing impact from the resources at hand. With a clear understanding of the links between actions and impacts and a well-designed measurement program, you’re on your way to meeting your impact goals and logging successes year after year. But what if that’s not enough? Social and environmental problems will always be greater than our ability to address them. Once you’ve developed the ability to be consistently successful in creating social change, you may feel that it’s time to take on bigger challenges.

For-profits or nonprofits operating in competitive markets have no choice of whether to strive for continual improvement and reinvention. As soon as they reach a level at which they’re comfortably profitable, some other organization will attempt to copy or compete with them for customers and profits. However, many nonprofits lack the market pressure that requires diligent management to avoid losing competitive advantage. As long as funding sources are accessible, nonprofits can survive for decades without making significant gains in impact.

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11: Sweat equity versus blood equity: CARING FOR YOURSELF

Kevin Lynch Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

We know from parents, school, and a lifetime of societal messages that we need to contribute, sacrifice, and drive hard in order to achieve success. We have been taught all along that we will have to invest in our own success.

In the business world, when dollars are invested in the starting of a business, it’s called equity. Another type of equity is called sweat equity. Sweat equity accrues when someone puts in time and effort for no immediate compensation but is a contributor to the success of a business and will be rewarded for this sweat with a share in the success of the business when the equity is sold or pays dividends. Many times this equity goes unrewarded because many businesses fail. The investment of sweat equity is an understood risk for the possibility of a high return.

But what if your contribution to the enterprise goes beyond sweat equity? What if the effort goes beyond a reasonable investment of time? What if the exertion of effort is more than sweat? What if the toll of this unusually high contribution on your part starts to impact your health? What if this begins to negatively impact your relationship with your spouse and children?

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12 Call to Action

Marc J. Epstein Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Investing in impact is not easy, but the world needs you. The social and environmental issues we face today are tremendous. But investors like you are making great strides in many areas, and there has never been more interest in solving the big problems. Tackling the challenges that lie ahead will require all of us to invest our scarce resources in the most strategic and effective ways possible.

You’ve already chosen to devote your time, money, and other precious resources to help others by promoting positive social and environmental changes. And now you’re making the decision to manage your investments in new ways to create the maximum possible benefits. We’ve all heard about well-meant projects that have languished or failed, and none of us wants to waste resources or fall short of the promises we’ve made to our beneficiaries and ourselves. With good intentions, deep thinking, and careful management, every investor can create better outcomes.

The time is right to focus on impact. Virtually all stakeholders involved with social impact—investors, regulators, community members, trade partners, and beneficiaries—are more interested than ever in making sure that these investments make a difference. While this puts pressure on investors to deliver, it also leads to a great deal more attention toward providing support and resources that can help deliver impact.

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