Aeon Books (458)
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Two

Jenkins, Lee Aeon Books ePub

I woke up at about ten o'clock in the morning, lounged in the bed another hour, and got up at eleven. Julia, my sister, had long since left for work; the children, still in school, had also long since departed, and Mordecai, who operated a janitorial service, and worked at night and sometimes in the afternoon as well, had managed, apparently, to be off somewhere on an errand. Mordecai ought, as Julia would have said, to be home sleeping. Since Mordecai had been home early in bed the previous night, he might have said that he could allow himself this early morning excursion. She was afraid of his falling asleep, at six and seven in the morning, speeding down the expressway, on his way back home from a night's work. He would not admit that he was also afraid. And I, having already been pressed into service, accompanying him in those gray early morning hours, kept my heavy eyelids open. One advantage of graduate school was that you got used to staying up all night and all day too. But I found that the physical drudgery I'd now come to experience was more taxing by far than any amount of sustained mental exercise in a study. It made the body ache and disposed it to sleep in an exhaustion and fatigue that seemed life-threatening, whereas all-night study simply deadened the mind and cramped the muscles. Under these circumstances, sleep was refreshing and restorative, but not life-preserving, in the sense I'd now come to know it. I'd already found out what it was like to sweep hundreds of square feet of office floor, carry to and fro large trash bins, wax floors with powerful machines that had minds of their own and would not submit to operators weak in the arms and the shoulders; what it was like to clean plate glass windows and venetian blinds, dust furniture and clean out bathrooms, maneuver my broom in restaurants behind the counter in tight grimy spaces, fascinated by the vermin which inhabited some of the places.

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Medium 9781912573233

Section I: Getting my Hands Dirty

Marzillier, John Aeon Books ePub

SECTION I

GETTING MY HANDS DIRTY

A blond, curly-haired, slightly chubby 17-year-old boy sits by a squat, black telephone staring out of the top-floor latticed window of a grand house on the Berkshire/Surrey borders. The telephone is the old-fashioned sort with a circular chrome dial that has letters on it as well as numbers and requires a hard tug to make it move. The phone does not ring and the boy appears not to be interested in it. In fact, the vacancy of his gaze, his casual, slumped posture, the occasional, irregular drumming of his fingers on the window-seat, suggest that he is entirely caught up with his internal world and that the external world is, for the moment, lost to him. Were he to take in what is in his immediate vision, he would see a square, gravel forecourt below, temporarily empty of cars, leading to a drive that bifurcates in front of what, in the summer, is a sumptuous rose-garden but is now a long parcel of dark earth. There is a small cottage beyond and, everywhere to his left and right, stands the gaunt tracery of trees and bushes that make up the extensive grounds. If he were to open the window, lean out and look to his left, he would just see the top of a tennis court. And if he were to look to the right, he might catch a glimpse of Rosie, his brother's foul-tempered horse, in the field beyond the hedge. And if he had been looking out of a window on the other side of the house, he would see manicured lawns, neat, cultivated flower-beds, a rectangular swimming pool dormant under a grey plastic cover, and an expansive view across fields and woods unimpeded by another house or building. It would remind him, if he needed reminding, that he was a privileged child, the son of rich and successful parents, on the brink of what he hopes will be a glittering career.

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Six

Jenkins, Lee Aeon Books ePub

I returned on Sunday morning in my newly repaired car. When I opened up the hood, it looked clean and new. It felt tight but responded just like I imagined a new car would. I went through an automated car wash and cleaned it, and its white finish was still bright. It had been a pleasure driving through the crisp morning sunshine and the yellow-reddish turning and falling of leaves. It didn't appear as if there'd be much of a display, just the dull-yellowish turning and then the dropping of the leaves, and then the bare limbs reaching skyward; but there were always individual instances of brilliant display, and the poison ivy running up the trees and along fence posts turned also, sometimes a bright scarlet, often a burgundy color. A faculty parking lot was in an area that I could see from my window, abutting my magnolia tree, and I parked there, thinking how I could always be in a position to keep an eye on the car, even though there was no need. While in Atlanta I had called and spoken to Sarah, speaking with her in the most cordial way, as if we were old high school friends keeping in touch. Yet, sitting in my rooms, she did not seem far away. In fact she seemed near, someone always close to me, no matter what happened with this other woman. This other one was like some sort of experience waiting to be explored, a meeting of trajectories. Again I wanted to call her, and did, receiving no answer. Was she not answering? Just being near her now was wonderful. I wondered how long that would last. I put on some music, Gould's Well-Tempered Clavier, and lay on the bed looking at the ceiling light, the bottom half of a convex sphere suspended from chains which gave back a reflection of me staring at it.

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Four

Jenkins, Lee Aeon Books ePub

Mordecai and Richardson, Rich for short, one of Mordecai's workmen, and I arrived at the supermarket a little before closing time. “A heavy night,” Mordecai said, “but we ought to knock it out by twelve and take out the two offices by four a.m.”

“No problem,” said Richardson, a half-smoked, fat stogie in his mouth, which he seemed to get more pleasure chomping on than smoking and, I noted, was much partial to discharging copious brown dollops into toilets and waste receptacles. I was carrying in a buffing machine as the last of the customers came out carrying grocery bags, a woman and three children, each occupied with a bag. I looked up and down across the aisle of checkout counters into the eyes of a brown-skinned young woman at the end with a round, candid face like an apple. She was tall as well as round, though not fat, seeming to give off good feeling, cheerfulness. “Hi,” she said, and blushed, as I passed by. We had been content to just look at each other on prior occasions.

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Chapter Ten: Know Thyself

Couroucli-Robertson, Katerina; Robertson, Ian Aeon Books ePub

Know thyself

It struck me as strange that someone who had spent twenty years in a nunnery on an isolated hill ten kilometres outside Patra should want the services of a therapist. In her world of prayer and tranquillity, I assumed I would be redundant. Rhea was, as she informed me, a former nun, who had been a highly respected member of the all-women community in which she had lived.

Standing on the doorstep to my office building, Rhea confronted me like a burst of orange blossom, the bright sunlight appearing to radiate straight through her. When she stepped inside, I understood why. She was bony thin and her skin, stretched taut over the cheek bones, was almost diaphanous, revealing tiny blood vessels under the paper thin epidermis. She extended a sinewy hand, shyly, a timid smile revealing an array of well tended teeth.

She was wearing a pistachio-coloured dress that hugged her fragile frame. Her shoulders were a little rounded, suggesting a self-effacing humility acquired over time. She held her hands piously in front of her. When I indicated the armchair diagonally opposite mine, she sat down, but looked ill at ease. She seemed to perch rather than sit on the edge of the seat.

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Aeon Games (8)
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Medium 9781911471127

The World of Thennla

Drake, Jonathan Aeon Games ePub

Thennla is explored in two sourcebooks: SHORES OF KORANTIA and THE TASKAN EMPIRE, each providing more detail on two of the great empires of the world. This sourcebook extracts information from these supplements to give prospective players and Games Masters an introduction to Thennla before delving into greater details. It concentrates on the continent of Taygus, home to the Taskan and Korantine cultures.

THE WORLD OF THENNLA

Thennla is named after its primary earth-goddess, Theyna. This world is one in which humanity is not only the dominant sentient race but, according to many, is the only sentient race.

Geography

The world is a disc upon which the major land masses encircle an Inner Ocean and which are, in turn, surrounded by the Outer Ocean. Beyond the Outer Ocean is the Edge of the World and it is variously reported that crossing over is impossible, is certain death, or offers transport to other worlds or dimensions. Above the world is the realm of sky, which stretches all around at least as far as the Edge of the World, and above that is the Vault of Heaven which, so far as is known, is solid and impenetrable. The distance from one side of the world to the other is about 11,265 kilometres. The Vault of Heaven's height is unknown, but it is assumed to be dome-shaped and at least 1,600 kilometres high at its centre. Some scholars suspect that it is, in fact, the upper part of a sphere within which sits the earth, with the vast majority of the sphere's volume being beneath the earth's surface, where the Many Hells are to be found.

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Medium 9781911471097

Creatures

Nash, Pete; Whitaker, Lawrence Aeon Games ePub

Many adventures are filled with animals, monsters and creatures of myth. The primary use of creatures is as adversaries, but they should never be thought of strictly in these terms. Every creature has its own motivations, instincts and drives, just as characters do, and they can be much more than simply sword or arrow fodder. Intelligent, sapient creatures in particular may act with similar degrees of intelligence, guile and cunning as any character and, with the right approach, can be developed into characters in their own right.

Most creatures are defined by the same characteristics, attributes and skills as player characters (with instinct INS replacing INT in non-sapient species). There are, however, certain differences that help mark creatures from standard humans, notably Creature Abilities which are cabailities granted due to physiology or a supernatural nature.

The following creatures are just a handful of fantasy, real world and science fiction examples to get you started. Countless more can be found in the full MYTHRAS rules and its supplements.

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Spot Rules

Nash, Pete; Whitaker, Lawrence Aeon Games ePub

Many different things can occur during a game. Some are resolved through skill use or one of the major game mechanics such as combat; others require their own rules for adjudication. This chapter provides rules and guidance for a variety of different scenarios that Games Masters and players will encounter whilst playing MYTHRAS.

FATIGUE

Fatigue measures tiredness and its incremental effects. It is used to track many different things from strenuous activity to the debilitating effects of disease.

The primary way of accruing Fatigue is by engaging in some form of physical activity. The more arduous the exercise or work, the more quickly it tires the character. At the Games Master's discretion, characters must make an appropriate skill roll – either Athletics, Brawn or Endurance – to resist gaining a level of Fatigue.

Every failed roll accrues a level of Fatigue. Each level of Fatigue carries penalties for skill use, movement, Initiative and Action Points. Asphyxiation, Blood Loss and other setting dependent effects also contribute to Fatigue accrual.

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Skills

Nash, Pete; Whitaker, Lawrence Aeon Games ePub

Part of the fun and drama of MYTHRAS comes in making a roll against a skill to see if success or failure is the outcome. It can be tempting to call for skill rolls for each and every challenge but there are some cases where rolls are not needed. However, when the action becomes dramatic or extraordinary, players and the Games Master should roll dice for the resolution. It is usually obvious when a skill roll is necessary, but if in doubt, consider the consequences of failure: are they crucial to the plot? Does the chance of failure heighten tension and make for an exciting possibility? Will a failure add fun to the game? If the answer is Yes to any of these, then have the character make a skill roll.

HOW DO I SUCCEED?

The most important question in a roleplaying game is “Do I succeed or do I fail?” Next is “How well did I succeed or fail?” MYTHRAS provides an easy-to-understand system to measure these chances, using dice rolls to determine whether an action succeeds or fails. Some skills (especially combat skills) are inherently dramatic and dangerous, and always are rolled for.

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Characters

Nash, Pete; Whitaker, Lawrence Aeon Games ePub

Every player in MYTHRAS controls a character. A character is the player's alter-ego, and is usually very different, physically and mentally, to the player. MYTHRAS characters can be from a variety of races, according to the setting for the game; a historical setting would feature just humans, whereas a fantasy setting could involve dwarfs, elves and even lizardmen!

The basic character is defined by a series of different elements that describe the character's capabilities. These elements are:

Most of these elements are described in terms of numbers, and some are dependent on or calculated by others. What each element means, and how they are determined, is described in the following sections.

Characters are usually recorded on a character sheet, which is a handy way of organizing all the information about the character. It is recommended that you first design your character using scratch paper, and then transfer the information to a character sheet once you have gone through each step of the process. Use a pencil and have an eraser handy; certain numbers such as skill values will change several times during the character creation process.

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Berrett Koehler Publishers (61)
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Medium 9781609945626

Your Quiet Influence Quotient (QIQ) Self-Assessment Product

Kahnweiler, Jennifer B. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub
Medium 9781609945626

Five Strength #2: Preparation

Kahnweiler, Jennifer B. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

“Intuition is critical in everything you do but without relentless preparation everything you do is meaningless.”

Tim Cook, CEO, Apple

Jake is an introspective associate director of English for a large educational nonprofit organization. Recognized as a highly effective manager, Jake fits the bill as a Quiet Influencer. The Quiet Influence strength that has become his signature quality: Preparation.

Take how he handled this challenge as an example. In the testing phase of a new teacher-training program, Jake needed to convince a significant number of regional partner agencies to persuade their teachers to use new and improved materials. He faced two key obstacles: one, the fact that the agencies and teachers already felt overloaded, and two, the risk these partners perceived about getting on board before the program was finalized. Most agencies said they would rather wait until all the kinks were ironed out before investing the time and effort necessary to launch a new curriculum.

Jake thought carefully about these objections and crafted a plan to convert these regional agencies into critical development partners. First, he created a short teaser video with animated stick figures. It was poignant yet humorous so that viewers could relate to the issue and presented the problem that needed solving. Jake distributed the video to a wide range of new and potential partner agencies. Next, he discussed his vision for the program in one-on-ones with key opinion leaders within the regional agencies. After a sneak preview presentation, Jake asked them to each submit a proposal for consideration as a tester.

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Three Your Quiet Influence Quotient (QIQ)

Kahnweiler, Jennifer B. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

“What I want most to do is be influential.”

Philip Johnson, Architect

 

Would you like to know how well you perform as a Quiet Influencer? Start by taking this quiz to determine your Quiet Influence Quotient—your “QIQ.” This tool will let you know how effective you are at using each of the Six Strengths and give you a way to assess your progress as you apply the ideas in the book.

Based on actions that demonstrate the strengths that set Quiet Influencers apart, the QIQ will also give you an idea of how much you have in common with highly effective Quiet Influencers. Assess yourself by indicating how often you engage in these behaviors, using a scale from 1 (never) to 5 (almost always). A caution: Try not to overanalyze the questions. Your initial response is usually the most valid. Also avoid being too tough or easy a critic. Instead, when you respond, be as objective as possible.

Total the numbers you circled. The following ranges reflect a rough estimate of your QIQ.

Caveat: This is not a scientific or “normed” instrument. Instead, it is a quick self-assessment tool that will help you see which of the strengths you use most often, which could use some development, and how you fare overall. Use it as a guide and starting point as you collect ideas from the book.

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Medium 9781626563056

Chapter 3 Accept the Alien

Kahnweiler, Jennifer B. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

“Accept that your partner is a pain in the ass. Accept that you are a pain in the ass, so the two of you are made for each other. Accept that what makes you furious about your partner is wrapped up with what excites you. What you most love and what drives you crazy is the same thing. Just on a bad hair day.” 6

—Joshua Wolf Shenk, author of Powers of Two

Accept the Alien: You can’t change your opposite, but you can understand them. Once you are able to accept this fact, you are in for much less stress.

Anthony Morris and Errol la Grange run a growing online training organization in Melbourne, Australia. These opposites’ creative ideas explode like popcorn.

Anthony is a thoughtful and mild-mannered introvert who sent me fully thought-out responses to my questions about their partnership. Errol is a smiling extrovert who shows up in daily Facebook posts, meeting people around the world. He thrives on going to coffee shops and chatting with just about anyone. Their complementary differences showed up when I met them both for the first time. Anthony wore what he called his “good ole brown pull-on shoes” purchased from a local shoe store, and Errol stood out in his turquoise cowboy boots from San Francisco, making for a great conversation starter.

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Chapter Six: What’s Next? Deliberate Learning for Life

Peterson, Kay Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

I believe that we learn by practice. Whether it means to learn to dance by practicing dancing or to learn to live by practicing living, the principles are the same. In each, it is the performance of a dedicated precise set of acts, physical or intellectual, from which comes shape of achievement, a sense of one’s being, a satisfaction of spirit. One becomes, in some area, an athlete of God. Practice means to perform, over and over again in the face of all obstacles, some act of vision, of faith, of desire. Practice is a means of inviting the perfection desired.

Martha Graham

How do you put the essentials of the learning way into practice? This chapter covers three strategies to help you to build learning flexibility and ultimately transform your life: deep experiencing, deliberate learning, and starting small with one big thing. By intentionally integrating your quest for learning flexibility into your daily life, you will continue to follow a path of self-discovery. This path reveals itself in the moment, presenting new challenges and opportunities to unleash the hidden parts of yourself as you travel down it step by step.

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Ediciones Karnac (185)
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Medium 9781910444061

CAPÍTULO UNO - El modelo de los tres niveles para observar las transformaciones del paciente (3-LM)

Altmann de Litvan, Marina Ediciones Karnac ePub

Ricardo Bernardi

Resumen

La descripción de las transformaciones o cambios que ocurren en los pacientes a lo largo del análisis es de gran importancia teórica y práctica. Se propone una guía o heurística para observar y describir los cambios del paciente, usando tres niveles sucesivos de análisis, por esta razón llamado el “Modelo de los tres niveles para observar las transformaciones del paciente” (3-LM). Cada uno de estos niveles, que serán descritos en este artículo, propone preguntas específicas que buscan servir como guía para la discusión grupal o para la reflexión personal del analista. Desde el punto de vista heurístico, se espera que el 3-LM realce y refine la observación clínica y la descripción de las transformaciones que ocurren durante largos períodos de análisis, o en el transcurrir de un tratamiento completo. Este artículo discutirá los tipos de observación y de dimensiones clínicas que podrían ser útiles para este objetivo, sus dificultades y limitaciones, y las potencialidades de nuevos desarrollos.

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CAPÍTULO CINCO - La depresión y el trauma: el psicoanálisis de un paciente con depresión crónica—un ejemplo de estudio de caso basado en los tres niveles de observación clínica

Altmann de Litvan, Marina Ediciones Karnac ePub

Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber

Comentarios preliminares

Acerca de la concentración de la atención del analista en la transformación de los pacientes

En la conferencia de la Federación Psicoanalítica Europea (EPF, por la sigla en inglés) de abril de 2010 en Copenhague, se me pidió que participara en un panel dedicado a la reflexión acerca de los logros de los diez años de los grupos de trabajo dentro de la EPF. En resumen: desde mi punto de vista, uno de los grandes logros de los grupos de trabajo clínico (Clinical Working Parties), iniciados por David Tuckett en 2000, es que las interminables contiendas entre las diferentes escuelas psicoanalíticas se han atenuado, sobre todo en los grupos de trabajo clínico (métodos clínicos comparados [CCM, por la sigla en inglés], véase Tuckett et al., 2008), pero también en los otros grupos de las iniciativas de la EPF, los que se reunieron y trabajaron juntos regularmente durante diez años. Se creó una cultura nueva de curiosidad y respeto por los otros, por diferentes pensamientos conceptuales y clínicos de colegas de muchas regiones diferentes dentro de la EPF y de “escuelas” diferentes (kleinianos, freudianos contemporáneos, “relacionistas objetales”, kohutianos, intersubjetivistas, etc.). Esta cultura ayudó a superar la competencia infructuosa por el punto de vista teórico “correcto” o “erróneo”, las interpretaciones y actitudes clínicas “correctas” y “erróneas”, etc. Se desarrolló una nueva apreciación de la riqueza del pluralismo contemporáneo dentro del psicoanálisis europeo. En mi opinión, esto es una liberación inmensa de la intolerancia o incluso las estructuras pseudoreligiosas, que en el pasado resultaran tan destructivas para el psicoanálisis en tanto disciplina científica (véase p. ej. Makari, 2008; Zaretsky, 2004).

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CAPÍTULO SIETE - La incidencia de nuestro modelo teórico en nuestro pensamiento clínico—trabajando con el tercer nivel del Modelo de los Tres Niveles

Altmann de Litvan, Marina Ediciones Karnac ePub

Adela Leibovich de Duarte

El filósofo escocés David Hume afirmó en el Treatise of Human Nature (1739) que las personas necesitan comprender y explicar todo lo que observan porque esto hace que el mundo adquiera más sentido.

Esta necesidad intrínseca de entender y explicar el mundo que nos rodea incluye nuestra necesidad de reconocer y tratar de dar sentido a los otros con quienes compartimos o no percepciones y concepciones sobre el mundo. El reconocimiento de la otredad está intrínsecamente imbricado en nuestra comprensión general del mundo. Según Bowlby (1969, 1973) el procesamiento de la información tiene lugar en el contexto de nuestro “modelo de trabajo interno” que nos ayuda a percibir acontecimientos y construir planes para el futuro.

Nuestra subjetividad existe en un espacio intersubjetivo y, como plantea Mitchell (2000), una mente presume otras mentes. El encuentro analítico tiene lugar, precisamente, en un espacio intersubjetivo, en tanto es el encuentro entre dos subjetividades diferentes que usualmente comparten un bagaje cultural común y un mismo lenguaje. El reconocimiento de la otredad está intrínsecamente implicado en nuestro trabajo clínico.

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CAPÍTULO TRECE - La evaluación de los cambios: aspectos diagnósticos

Altmann de Litvan, Marina Ediciones Karnac ePub

Ricardo Bernardi

Introducción: dimensiones de cambios del paciente

El Modelo de los Tres Niveles para la Observación de las Transformaciones del Paciente (3-LM) presentado en otro capítulo de este libro (ver Bernardi, Capítulo 1) tiene el objetivo de observar y describir los cambios del paciente a través del examen del material clínico estudiado desde diversos ángulos o perspectivas. Mientras que el primer nivel de observación (fenomenológico) se acerca al material tomando ventaja de la posición del analista en tanto participante en el proceso, el nivel 2 requiere una “segunda mirada” sobre el mismo. En este nivel el analista, como observador, procura especificar las dimensiones de cambio basadas en categorías que faciliten una comparación sistemática tanto entre diferentes momentos en el tratamiento de ese paciente como entre pacientes distintos. El nivel 3, a su vez, discute las hipótesis acerca del cambio y su naturaleza, incluyendo las teorías explícitas e implícitas del analista así como hipótesis alternativas. Generalmente el juicio clínico combina estos tres niveles, mientras que el 3-LM busca separarlos transitoriamente, buscando en primer lugar una comprensión empática del paciente, para la posterior conceptualización de las principales dimensiones identificadas en el nivel 2 y discutir por último su explicación teórica.

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Medium 9781910444023

CAPÍTULO II - Trabajos de Freud relacionados con el análisis de niños

Markman Reubins, Beatriz Ediciones Karnac ePub

Muchas publicaciones de Freud están relacionadas con el análisis de niños, por lo que fue una influencia temprana en el desarrollo del pensamiento psicoanalítico del niño. Fue capaz de estar en contacto con niños sintomáticos y aplicar sus teorías en ellos, ya que conocía la importancia de observar directamente al niño para corroborar lo que iba descubriendo en sus pacientes adultos.

Los siguientes trabajos representan el pensamiento de Freud sobre los niños que observó. Entre ellos se encuentra “Juanito”, el niño de cinco años, hijo de uno de sus amigos más cercanos, y otro niño que tenía alrededor de dieciocho meses, hijo de una de sus hijas:

•Actos sintomáticos y casuales, en Psicopatología de la vida cotidiana (SE 6, 1901b, pp. 191–216)

Tres ensayos sobre la teoría de la sexualidad (SE 7, 1905d, pp. 135–243)

Análisis de una fobia en un niño de cinco años, “Juanito” (SE 10, 1909b, pp. 5–149; “Pequeño Juanito”)

Reflexiones sobre la psicología de un niño en la escuela (SE 13, 1914f, p. 2241)

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Editora Karnac (46)
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Medium 9781910445129

CAPÍTULO PRIMEIRO - Estados mentais

Waddell, Margot Editora Karnac ePub

“O tempo presente e o tempo passado

Estão ambos talvez presentes no tempo futuro,

E o tempo futuro também contido no tempo passado.”

T. S. Elliot

As noções de crescimento e desenvolvimento sugerem uma progressão linear, que é mais diretamente descrita pela passagem cronológica do tempo do nascimento à morte. Há algo, no entanto, em relação a esses aspectos do desenvolvimento da natureza humana que a simples cronologia não consegue explicar. É o que alguns psicanalistas chamam de “estados mentais”.

Não existe uma definição psicológica simples para o que Elliot sugere no poema acima, mas ainda assim o trecho transmite algo crucial para a tarefa de compreender o que significa a noção de “estados mentais”. Qualquer estado mental no presente, ainda que fugaz, é fundado no passado, e ao mesmo tempo contém um possível futuro. Muito reside na sua natureza e qualidade: ele alimenta as bases para uma possibilidade de desenvolvimento? Ele limita um crescimento potencial a determinada “configuração mental” estática ou congelada? Ele coloca o desenvolvimento em um curso reverso, ligando a personalidade a um self passado do qual é novamente difícil de desligar-se? Tais estados podem ser efêmeros ou podem ser arraigados. Eles podem conter encorajamento para seguir adiante, ou oferecer a tentação de olhar para trás.

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CAPÍTULO SÉTIMO - Modelos de aprendizagem

Waddell, Margot Editora Karnac ePub

“Deus me guarde dos pensamentos

Que os homens pensam somente em suas mentes

Aquele que canta a canção duradoura

Pensa com a medula óssea.”

W. B. Yeats

Acapacidade de uma criança para se desenvolver e crescer internamente está intimamente relacionada com o tipo de aprendizagem que venha acontecendo desde as primeiras fases de sua vida. Dependendo da tarefa ou função predominante da fase em questão, diferentes modelos de aprendizagem entrarão em jogo. Durante a latência, por exemplo, uma criança pode precisar e desfrutar da sensação de ter uma extensão de habilidades e um acúmulo de informações. Em outra etapa, talvez na adolescência, esse tipo de aprendizagem pode parecer contrário à capacidade mais imaginativa e criativa de começar a pensar por si mesmo. Mas há outra distinção fundamental subjacente a essas mudanças de ênfase entre uma fase e outra. É o que Yeats tão impressionantemente descreve como a diferença entre o pensamento que ocorre “somente na mente” e o que ocorre “na medula óssea”. Uma distinção semelhante permeia a obra de Bion: ele se interessava pelo contraste entre aprender “sobre” as coisas e ser capaz de aprender a partir da experiência do self no mundo.

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CAPÍTULO DÉCIMO SEGUNDO - O mundo adulto

Waddell, Margot Editora Karnac ePub

“A presença de uma natureza nobre, generosa em seus desejos, ardente em sua caridade, muda nossa perspectiva: começamos a ver novamente as coisas como um todo mais silencioso, e a acreditar que também podemos ser vistos e julgados na inteireza do nosso caráter.”

George Eliot

“Quando eu crescer quero ser um ‘dulto’”, foi como um pequeno menino de seis anos de idade descreveu a ambição da sua vida. Na mente da criança na latência, existe um “mundo” diferente e centralmente importante em relação ao qual ele define e organiza o seu próprio: o de “gente grande”. Aos sete anos, ou mesmo aos onze, é impossível imaginar que os “adultos” estão eles próprios ainda lutando com o que significa ser um “dulto”; que ao longo de suas vidas, muitos deles permanecem significativamente envolvidos com o processo de “crescer”. E que o engajamento continuado ainda é necessário, pois a crença de que a maturidade foi atingida pode ser uma séria ilusão infantil. O que é uma identidade adulta? Como podemos definir a maturidade? Bion (1961) sugeriu que não deveríamos “presumir com muita facilidade que o rótulo na embalagem é uma boa descrição do conteúdo” (p. 37). O fato de que alguém superficialmente pareça adulto (seja por chegar aos vinte e um anos, assumir uma hipoteca, vestir um jaleco branco ou um terno risca de giz ou criar filhos) pode ter pouco a ver com os estados pueris ou infantis subjacentes ao exterior socialmente definido. O ônus da inautenticidade é frequentemente imenso. Muitos poderiam compartilhar a sensação de Margaret Atwood, de que ela estava “disfarçada” de adulta.

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BERENICE

Brafman, A.H. Editora Karnac ePub

O clínico geral da família nos pediu para ver esta menina de 12 anos, porque sua mãe descobrira que Berenice havia roubado dinheiro de sua bolsa e que também estava matando aulas na escola. A Sra. B estava muito perturbada e chorando quando falou com a secretária da clínica para marcar uma consulta. Ela sentia como se, de repente, houvesse sido aberto um enorme vácuo entre ela e Berenice: ela mencionou fazer perguntas à filha e não ter conseguido mais do que “um olhar vazio”. A Sra. B queria ver o médico o mais cedo possível e ficou aliviada quando a secretária lhe disse que uma hora no dia seguinte havia sido cancelada. A secretária comentou comigo que a Sra. B mostrava um grau de angústia que parecia algo desproporcional à sua descrição do comportamento de Berenice.

A Sra. B veio à entrevista não só com Berenice, mas também com seu marido. Minha impressão de Berenice era de uma menina de doze anos sem qualquer característica que chamasse atenção; bem vestida, de altura média e aparência bem agradável. A Sra. B estava extremamente tensa e o Sr. B parecia pouco à vontade, como se não entendesse bem o que poderia ser o propósito desse encontro comigo. Ambos haviam nascido e crescido na comunidade onde moravam agora e suas famílias se conheciam há décadas. O Sr. B trabalhava em construção de prédios e sua esposa fazia ocasionais limpezas domésticas. Eles tinham dois filhos mais jovens e ambos frisavam o quão comum e normal havia sido a vida da família - até a crise atual com Berenice romper a imagem de segurança do passar dos dias.

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GLORIA

Brafman, A.H. Editora Karnac ePub

Gloria havia ido com suas amigas a um parque de diversões e, a certa altura, decidiu entrar num atalho quando queria ir à outra parte do parque. Quando estavam passando por trás de uma barraca, se viram de repente frente a um cachorro que pulou em cima delas e, por azar, mordeu o lábio de Gloria.

Gloria ficou muito abalada por essa experiência, mas o que eventualmente a trouxe à clínica para ver o Psiquiatra infantil, foi o fato de que durante os dois meses seguintes ela acordava várias vezes durante a noite aos berros e chorando inconsolavelmente, falando de terríveis pesadelos de que ela não conseguia se lembrar e, algumas vezes, também sofrendo de sonambulismo.

Gloria veio me ver junto com sua mãe. Ela era uma menina atraente e inteligente de 12 anos de idade. Ela me contou de sua família e da vida escolar. A Sra. G respondeu às minhas perguntas com boa vontade e por vezes esclarecendo algum dado da vida familiar de que Gloria não tivesse certeza. A Sra. G parecia bem mais jovem do que uma pessoa de seus trinta e tantos anos de idade e ela tinha uma relação amistosa e bem chegada com sua filha, que era uma de seus três filhos. O Sr. G havia abandonado a família alguns anos antes e agora vivia em outro país, mas eles haviam mantido uma relação amistosa que permitia às crianças se sentirem chegadas aos dois pais. A Sra. G ocupava um alto cargo administrativo numa grande companhia comercial e tinha uma posição muito ativa na educação dos filhos.

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