University Of North Texas Press (50)
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Introduction: Latino Urban Agency, Sharon A. Navarro and Rodolfo Rosales

Edited by Sharon A. Navarro and Rodolfo Rosales University of North Texas Press PDF

Introduction:

Latino Urban Agency

The

decision To compile This collecTion of essays on The urban

political presence of the Latino community was based on a critically important question that is generally taken for granted when analyzing

Latino politics. This question has to do with the definition of Latino politics in a changing political landscape in America. Is there, or can there be, a generic, overarching definition/identity of Latinos in the United States?

The premise in approaching this question, and our resulting decision to compile these essays, is that the Latino community is one of the most diverse communities that can be defined ethnically.

More importantly, as diversity within the Latino community intensified toward the end of the first decade of the twenty-first century, the question of how Latino communities would relate to the larger changing political system,1 in what many political pundits called a post-racial era, became one of the most important questions facing both activists and scholars in the twenty-first century. An important factor to consider in this post-racial era is the emergence of particular political and electoral relationships between

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14. Is COPS Coming to Your Neighborhood?

Mary Beth Rogers University of North Texas Press PDF

14

Is COPS Coming to Your Neighborhood?

New York, 1986

Texas Lieutenant Governor William P. Hobby Jr. and I share a cab to La Guardia Airport on a crisp fall afternoon. It is one of those interminable rides out of Manhattan, with the mix of high speed, quick stops, and long waits that sends most Texans in New York into orbit. But I am relatively free of anxiety because we have plenty of time before our plane departs and

Hobby is calm because . . . Hobby is always calm, sometimes even maddeningly so.

We have been in New York to see the bond rating agencies about the financial condition of the State of Texas, which has not been good since the price of oil slipped from $21 to $11 a barrel. Wall Street is wary of Texas' ability to meet its obligations, and we have been part of a delegation to reassure investment bankers and bond analysts that state officials will behave responsibly and with fiscal "prudence." No one in the state can do a better job of reassuring Wall Street than quiet, seriouseven shy-Bill Hobby, who since 1972 has stood guard against extremism in Texas government.

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Chapter 4 | Keeping Secrets

Carol O’Keefe Wilson University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter 4

Keeping Secrets

W

ith the governorship secured in early November 1914, James

Ferguson began making preparations to move to Austin where he and his family would have the honor of living in the fifty-nine-yearold Governor’s Mansion. His first and most urgent order of business was obtaining a replacement for himself as president of Temple State Bank.

In early January of 1915 at the Temple bank, Ferguson met with his choice of replacement, Mr. H. C. Poe. Certainly both men were optimistic, each looking to launch a promising new career in which a reciprocal spirit of cooperation and support was essential. The meeting, which was in no way spontaneous, amounted to the changing-of-the-guard at Temple State Bank. Governor-elect Ferguson was turning over the reins of the bank, now eight-and-a-half years old, to Poe, a man with considerable experience considering his age of thirty-three.1

James Ferguson was a name that probably had little significance to Poe prior to the 1914 governor’s race except, perhaps, in banking circles. The young banker was likely flattered at the prospect of replacing the governor-elect and was undoubtedly eager to prove that he was capable of the task. At the time, Poe was living in Eastland, Texas, where he had been a teacher and an elected county clerk before taking employment at the City National Bank of Eastland, where he had risen to the position of president. Poe and his wife, Leonora “Nora,” had one child, a six-year-old daughter who was called by her middle name, Gertrude.2

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Chapter 18 | Shadow Governor

Carol O’Keefe Wilson University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter 18

Shadow Governer

T

he inauguration of the state’s first female governor was set for January

20, 1925, but Jim Ferguson did not wait for his wife’s swearing-in to parlay his new connections into a lucrative contract. On January 3, he announced that he had entered into an agreement as general counsel and advisor to W. T. Eldridge, owner of the Sugarland Railroad and three other railroad lines. Though not illegal, the arrangement constituted a serious conflict of interest because, as he had stated throughout his wife’s campaign, Jim intended to act as an advisor to the new governor. It was an early hint that Governor Miriam

Ferguson might not honor the agreement between certain top-ranking Democrats and herself, an agreement that she would insure that her husband refrained from behavior that could be seen as objectionable. 1

If the inauguration ceremony was any indication of the collective optimism felt by a large number of Texas’ five million, it was truly a day to celebrate. “Ten thousand cheering admirers of their ‘Farmer Jim’ idol made the hills of Austin resound with acclaim,” wrote the Dallas Morning News. On that day it seemed as if even the doubters had cast aside their skepticism in favor of hope that the woman at the podium might provide the glue necessary to bind great political divides.

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Chapter 15 | Seeking Redemption

Carol O’Keefe Wilson University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter 15

Seeking Redemption

T

he dispute with the university is generally cited as the reason for Jim

Ferguson’s impeachment; however, only three of the ten charges that were upheld against him related to the university matter. Indeed Ferguson’s financial dealings, and perhaps more importantly, his refusal to provide information about the mystery loan, in addition to the exposure of his efforts to stack the university board, ultimately led to his undoing. The university dispute, without question, served as a catalyst that united efforts to bring charges against him and spurred deeper examinations of his financial foibles. Those examinations could not pass the obvious evidence of misconduct and taken together with his misconduct surrounding the university, led to the governor’s unseating.

By the end of September 1917, Jim Ferguson was out of office and out of Austin but was by no means out of the woods when it came to trouble. The criminal indictment issued against him in July by a Travis County Grand Jury remained open. Five others had also been indicted as a result of information that came to light in the impeachment trial. The charges were as follows: Commissioner of Labor, C. W. Woodman, eight counts; Secretary of State C. J. Bartlett, four counts; Commissioner of Banking and Insurance, C. O. Austin, four counts; State

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Laxmi Publications (17)
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Sangit Kumar Ragi Laxmi Publications PDF

13

Mary Parker Follett

Biographical Sketch

Mary Parker Follett was an American political scientist and a management thinker. An author rightly commented that she carried several hats at the same time.1 She was a multifaceted personality indeed. She was a prolific writer, an untiring social and political activist, an academician of great repute and a great organization and management thinker. She wrote extensively and on diverse issues ranging from women empowerment to political democracy to resolving conflicts in the organization to crowd psychology. All her writings bear the stamp of her practical experience in the field and her emotional and penchant fervor for democracy in all walks of life starting from nearby organizations to industry to the political system. As monopolization of power anywhere is antithetical and incongruent to democracy Follett strongly argued in favour of pluralism and decentralization of authority.

Parker was born in a rich family at Quincy in Massachusetts. She did her schooling from Thayer Academy. Though she was born in a relatively affluent family, her childhood was witness to several storms. While she was too young her father died. Her mother was already a disabled person. She had to take up a lot of responsibility at home as well. In 1892, she joined the Society for

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7

Fred W. Riggs

(1917–2008)

Biographical sketch

The homepage of Riggs’ website carries the logo of a prism encircled by a snake. This is a carefully crafted combination of symbols. Riggs was born in a year which is considered to be a snake year in the Chinese mythology. And prism marks the confession of his intellectual journey. Fred W. Riggs, a social scientist of world repute who wrote extensively in the field of political science and public administration is known actually for his Prismatic Model. He himself acknowledges in his intellectual autobiography that this has been his most important contribution to the world of social science and specially the discipline of public administration. Prismatic model and Riggs have become synonymous to each other.

Riggs was born in Kuling, a beautiful mountain resort in China on the Yangtze river, on July 3, 1917. His parents were American missionaries who had come to China in 1916 to help the local peasants improve their agricultural productivity by using American methods.1 In the absence of any English speaking missionary school in the near vicinity, he had to rely upon home tuition and study material mailed from Baltimore by the Calvert School.

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Frederick W. Taylor

(1856–1915)

Biographical sketch

Frederick W. Taylor, popularly known as the father of scientific management, was born at Germantown in Philadelphia, in a relatively rich family, on

March 20, 1856. His mother was a feminist activist while his father was a lawyer. He grew up in a disciplined family background. It is learnt that he was a good student but could not pursue higher studies, probably due to an eyesight problem which he had since childhood. In 1874, he started his career as an apprentice in a company. However, the zeal for the knowledge could not completely keep him cut off from higher academics. He joined Steven

Institute of Technology and graduated from the same in 1883 in Mechanical

Engineering through correspondence course.

Though he started his career as an apprentice, he reached the top echelons of management with his hard work and an innovative mind. As a Chief Engineer and Consultant, he served several famous firms and companies of his time.

Some of his big clients were Midvale Steel Company, Cramp’s Shipbuilding

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Chester Irving

Barnard (1886–1961)

Biographical Sketch

Chester Irving Barnard was born on November 7, 1886 in Malden,

Massachusetts in America in a poor family. When he was barely five years old, he lost his mother and he was taken care of primarily by his father and grandfather. Though he was educated at Harvard but he was not the one who was born with a silver spoon. His father was a blacksmith. The family earning thus was not very high, yet he was intellectually very vibrant. Barnard himself recalls that there were always intellectual discussions on philosophical writings of people like Herbert Spencer, in his family. That certainly shaped his intellectual mind. Philosophy became a lifelong hobby for him. He also served as the member of the American Philosophical Society. Besides philosophy, what attracted him as a hobby was music. He learnt it while he joined a piano factory at the age of fifteen. He earned money from work and used it to get formal school education by enrolling himself at Mount Herman

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Woodrow Wilson

(1856–1924)

Biographical Sketch

Woodrow Wilson is rated among one of the finest presidents the United States of America has ever produced. Wilson was born in Virginia, in December

1856, in a wealthy and politically active family and spent his early childhood in Georgia and South Carolina. Since his father was very active politically and supported the ‘South Secession from the Union’, Wilson was exposed to a virulent political atmosphere of civil war in America since childhood. This also affected his childhood education which happened primarily at home. Wilson joined Princeton in 1875 and graduated in 1879. Subsequently, he joined the law school at University of Virginia. But the profession did not attract him much and he left it to join Johns Hopkins University, where he earned a PhD in history and political science in 1886. Wilson worked as a professor at Bryn

Mawr, Wesleyan and Princeton. He was elected as the President of Princeton in 1902. He brought in significant reforms in the college. This elevated his public image and he was invited by the Democrats of New Jersey in 1910 to be their candidate for the governor’s post. He earned a lot of repute during his tenure as a governor due to his pro-reforms policies. In 1912, he became the candidate of the Democratic Party for the president’s post of USA and won the election. The split within the Conservative Party helped him win the elections.

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