446 Slices
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781607051923

Pulling Weeds

Nancy Lee Murty C&T Publishing ePub

Finished block: 12″ × 12″

Finished quilt: 67″ × 67″

Skill level: Intermediate

If you're like me, childhood memories are full of time spent doing chores with family. I recall, quite vividly, pulling weeds in the garden, feeding the chickens, collecting the eggs, helping with the laundry, and the indent goes on. I didn't realize it at the time, but during all of these chores, we were talking, sharing, and even laughing. Indeed, they are some of the fondest memories I have.

As you choose your fabrics, put all of them together on your sewing table or even in a pile on the floor. Then pull the fabrics that don't fit with the others—these are your “weeds.” Just like the garden, your quilt will be that much better from the little bit of time you spend “weeding” your fabrics.

Pale green: 1½ yards for border

Light green: 1⅓ yards for blocks and border corners

Greens: ¾ yard each of 4 for blocks

Reds: ½ yard each of 4 for blocks and flowers

Turquoise blue: ¼ yard for flower hearts

Green: ½ yard for main bias stem

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Medium 9781607059974

Oilcloth Tote with Fabric Handles

Annabel Wrigley FunStitch Studio ePub

a teeny bit more challenging

Oilcloth Tote with Fabric Handles

Finished Size: 7˝ × 11˝ × 4˝

What Do I Need?

½ yard of oilcloth

½ yard of fabric for the lining

¼ yard of fabric for the handles

⅓ yard of interfacing

2½˝ × 2½˝ square of paper

Large paper clips

Basic sewing supplies

special skills

•Refer to The Rules of Sewing

• Using an iron

Prepare the Pieces

1.Cut 2 pieces of oilcloth to measure 12½˝ × 15˝ each for the outside.

2.Cut 2 pieces of fabric to measure 12½˝ × 15˝ each for the lining.

3.Cut 2 pieces of fabric to measure 4˝ × 15˝ each for the handles.

4.Cut 2 pieces of interfacing to measure 4˝ × 15˝ each for the handles.

TIP

If your oilcloth fabric is a little wrinkly and crinkly, resist the urge to use an iron! Irons and oilcloth sure don’t mix very well. Not only will your oilcloth be a melted mess, but your iron will be a mess too! Use a warm hairdryer held a few inches away to gently release the wrinkles. Be careful not to put it so close that the cloth starts to melt! After warming the oilcloth, I usually stack magazines on top until it has cooled.

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Medium 9781571206220

Red Rover

Kim Schaefer C&T Publishing ePub

Quilted by Diane Minkley

FINISHED BLOCK SIZES: 10″ × 10″, 5″ × 5″ FINISHED LAP QUILT: 79½″ × 79½″

Rich, textured solids in a variety of colors make this quilt lusciously vibrant. The pieced border frames the quilt top for a traditional look. Leave off the border for a more modern-looking quilt top.

4¼ yards total assorted brights for pieced blocks

¾ yard teal for inner border

1¾ yards total assorted brights for pieced border blocks

1⅛ yards brown for lattice in pieced border

7¼ yards backing and binding

84″ × 84″ batting

Cut from the assorted brights for the pieced blocks:

36 squares 3½″ × 3½″

72 rectangles 1½″ × 3½″

144 rectangles 1½″ × 5½″

144 rectangles 1½″ × 7½″

72 rectangles 2″ × 10½″

Cut from the teal for the inner border:

2 strips 3″ × 60½″ for the side borders*

2 strips 3″ × 65½″ for the top and bottom borders*

* Cut 7 strips 3″ × fabric width, piece the strips end to end (see page 9), and cut the border pieces.

Cut from the assorted brights for the pieced border blocks:

144 squares 1½″ × 1½″

192 rectangles 1½″ × 3½″

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Medium 9781571209580

Touching Stars: Starry Night

Helen Frost C&T Publishing ePub

Quilt size: 55¾” × 55¾” • Cut strip width: 1½” • Finished diamond width: 1”

Each star is made from a different color and set against a starry background print. Some stars sparkle and pop, while others recede into the night sky.

Machine pieced and quilted by Helen Frost, 2007.

Materials

Fabric 1 is for the center and outer tips of the star points. Fabric 3 is for the widest part of the star points. Look for a light, a medium, and a dark fabric in each of 9 different colors.

¼ yard each of 9 different colors for Fabric 1

1/3 yard each of the same 9 colors for Fabric 2

3/8 yard each of the same 9 colors for Fabric 3

1¼ yards for background

¼ yard for first border

1¾ yards for second border

½ yard for binding

3½ yards for backing

Batting: 62” × 62”

Read pages 7–24 before starting. Refer back to those pages as needed when constructing the quilt.

Cutting

Fabric 1

Cut 1 strip (from each of 9 colors) 4½” × width of fabric; subcut into 16 strips 1½” × 4½”

Fabric 2

Cut 1 strip (from each of 9 colors) 6½” × width of fabric; subcut into 16 strips 1½” × 6½”

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Medium 9781607059608

Spark 6. Make a Huge Mess

Carrie Bloomston Stash Books ePub

Every day when I pick up my daughter from preschool she is covered in remnants of her creative day, and I mean covered. She is dirty, sandy, gritty, painted, and stained. There’s sandwich on her face and sand in her pockets. Her shins are unrecognizably brownish-gray. I kneel down next to her, beaming, and say, “That’s what I like to see! I know you had a good day because you got messy!”

Do you honestly think I want that dirty child in my new car? Absolutely not! But I know I am being a really good mom in those moments because I am encouraging her creativity and validating her process and exploration. She can get in the bath later. Life is filled with opportunities, and if you are worried about getting dirty or making a mess, either metaphorically or for real, then you will be limited in your possibilities.

And so it is with grown-ups. You know you are on the right track if you are making a mess of something. You have to fall on your face sometimes. Who is your life for? Is it a big performance that you have rigged up with hidden strings and edited with Instagram-style filters to make you seem beautiful and perfect all the time? I did that for a long time. The years I Photoshopped my life into perfection and managed my image for some perceived gaze were some of the least creative of my life.

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Medium 9781607059608

Spark 10. Break Your Own Rules

Carrie Bloomston Stash Books ePub

I PROBABLY WROTE HALF OF THIS BOOK UP IN THE TREE FORT WE MADE (ALTHOUGH I WASN’T USUALLY IN MY SUPER-CUTE TOMS WEDGE HIGH HEELS). IT FELT RIGHT TO SHAKE IT UP AND BE CREATIVE ABOUT MY WRITING LOCATIONS, TO PICK CREATIVE SPOTS. I WROTE ONE CHAPTER IN MY DAUGHTER’S BED, SURROUNDED BY TOYS AND STUFFED CRITTERS.

Breaking out of the standard operating procedure you have created for yourself is a huge step toward a creative life. Cultivating a creative life means thinking and acting in new ways so you can be open to the possibilities around you.

YOU MUST DISRUPT YOUR NORMAL PATTERNS SO YOU CAN SEE THE WORLD WITH NEW EYES.

We often react to the world in predictable ways. Sometimes our behaviors become programmed, as if we are on autopilot. We put on our socks in the same order, follow the same routine in the shower, scoot around the house, and begin our day in a scripted pattern. These are the habits and patterns that we have created over many years.

My freshman year at art school, there was this teacher, you know, the teacher that has almost mythic status? His name was Al DeCredico (1944–2009). He was brilliant. His teaching techniques were designed to take the cocky, naïve nineteen-year-old freshman students and crack them wide open to the world and everything in it. How do you do that in a Drawing 101 class?

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Medium 9781571206220

Color Splash

Kim Schaefer C&T Publishing ePub

Quilted by Diane Minkley

FINISHED BLOCK SIZES: 10″ × 10″, 5″ × 5″ FINISHED TABLE RUNNER: 20½″ × 60½″

Going green is easy when you whip up this table runner from a smorgasbord of greens. This scrappy runner is sure to brighten any tabletop.

2 yards total assorted greens for pieced blocks and pieced border

2¼ yards for backing and binding

24″ × 64″ batting

Cut from the assorted greens for the pieced blocks:

5 squares 6½″ × 6½″

10 rectangles 1½″ × 6½″

20 rectangles 1½″ × 8½″

10 rectangles 1½″ × 10½″

Cut from the assorted greens for the pieced border blocks:

84 squares 1½″ × 1½″

112 rectangles 1½″ × 3½″

56 rectangles 1½″ × 5½″

1. Piece the block as shown. Press. Make 5 blocks.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

2. Piece the border block as shown. Press. Make 28 blocks.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

1. Arrange and sew together 5 blocks to form the center of the table runner. Press.

2. Arrange and sew together 2 rows of 10 border blocks to make the side borders. Press.

3. Sew the 2 side borders to the runner top. Press toward the borders.

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Medium 9781607053583

CRIB: Fishbowl

Emily Cier C&T Publishing PDF

PIXEL PLAY

18

A: 23½˝

B C: 3½˝

B D: 8½˝

E: 3½˝

A

C D: 4½˝

E: 8½˝

A: 2½˝ C: 2½˝ F: 5½˝

A: 13½˝

B C A: 3½˝

C: 4½˝

E: 5½˝

A C A: 2½˝ C F: 6½˝

A: 10½˝

B: 2½˝ C G A: 2½˝ C D: 3½˝

A C G A C F B F: 5½˝

A: 10½˝

B C A: 3½˝

C D: 2½˝ C: 7½˝

E: 3½˝

A F C: 2½˝ F: 5½˝

B F: 3½˝

A: 2½˝ B: 2½˝ A: 6½˝

B C: 3½˝

D: 3½˝ H: 2½˝ C: 6½˝

E: 2½˝

A: 2½˝ F: 3½˝

F: 6½˝

A F: 4½˝

B A: 3½˝

B D: 6½˝

H: 5½˝

E

C: 3½˝

C: 4½˝

A: 2½˝ F: 2½˝ B C: 5½˝

F: 2½˝ B F: 3½˝

A: 2½˝ F: 3½˝

B A: 2½˝ D: 6½˝

C: 2½˝ H: 5½˝

C: 3½˝

A: 2½˝ F: 3½˝

F: 6½˝

A: 5½˝

F: 2½˝ B A: 2½˝ D: 5½˝

H: 5½˝

C: 4½˝

E C: 4½˝

A: 3½˝

F: 3½˝

A F: 2½˝ A: 5½˝

F B A: 4½˝

D: 4½˝

H: 2½˝

C: 2½˝ F: 5½˝

E: 3½˝

C: 4½˝

B F: 2½˝ A: 3½˝

F B A: 11½˝

D: 3½˝

I: 2½˝ A: 2½˝ F: 5½˝

E: 4½˝

C: 5½˝

J: 3½˝

A: 3½˝

F: 5½˝

A: 4½˝

F: 2½˝ B A: 14½˝

J: 5½˝

A: 11½˝

F: 3½˝

B A: 14½˝

J: 6½˝

A: 12½˝

F: 2½˝ B A: 15½˝

J: 5½˝

F: 2½˝ A: 7½˝

E: 2½˝ A: 12½˝

J: 2½˝ E: 7½˝

A: 13½˝

K: 8½˝

E: 6½˝

L: 2½˝ E: 3½˝

A: 9½˝

K: 11½˝

A: 6½˝

K: 13½˝

E: 5½˝

L A: 2½˝ L E: 3½˝

A: 4½˝

K: 14½˝

E B E: 3½˝

L A G L E: 4½˝

B: 3½˝

A K: 2½˝ B: 4½˝

K: 10½˝

E: 3½˝

L: 2½˝ E: 7½˝

B K: 9½˝

E B E: 11½˝

L E A B: 2½˝ H: 4½˝

E: 4½˝

E: 3½˝

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Medium 9781607053583

TWIN: Pixelville

Emily Cier C&T Publishing PDF

C

1/4 yard

1481–Banana

L

1/4 yard

1007–Ash

M

1

⁄3 yard

1387–White

N

1/4 yard

1479–Amber

⁄8 yard

1058–Cadet

⁄8 yard

1016–Berry

⁄3 yard

1005–Aqua

⁄8 yard

1058–Cadet

E

1/2 yard

1362–Stone

O

1

F

1/2 yard

275–Sable

P

1

G 11/4 yards 1080–Coal

H

I

J

Q

1

1/2 yard

136–Basil

Binding

7

1

⁄3 yard

7–Tomato

Backing 5 7⁄8 yards* 1362–Stone

1/4 yard

1060–Candy Blue

Batting 84˝ × 104˝

* You may need additional backing fabric if your fabric is less than 44˝ wide.

A

3. Layer, quilt,

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

6

3

4

4

6

4

2

2

6

First cut: Number of 11/2˝ × WOF strips to cut

and bind following the instructions in

Quilting and Finishing

(pages 11–15).

33

61

17

40

8

8

28

8

Second cut

Welcome to

Pixelville!

511/2˝ *

1

481/2˝ *

1

421/2˝ *

4

391/2˝

2

381/2˝

2

361/2˝

2

311/2˝

4

301/2˝

1

291/2˝

1

271/2˝

1

261/2˝

1

251/2˝

1

231/2˝

61

1

2

221/2˝

CUTTING

Personalize your quilt by embroidering the town name in black within the welcome sign

(color N). Enlarge the design below 150%.

26–Canary

D 13/4 yards 316–Tarragon

2. Assemble the quilt top using the assembly diagram

(pages 62 and 63).

⁄8 yard

7

K

pixelville

a Time: A Pixel Quilting

Primer (pages 6–11) for assembly guidelines.

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Medium 9781607054863

Don’t Fence Me In

Alissa Haight Carlton Stash Books ePub

45″ × 60″

This cute little quilt is perfect for your friends’ baby girls! I always tend to make my baby quilts this size. It’s a bit big for a crib, but it means that a baby will cuddle under this cozy quilt well into her toddler years.

This quilt uses strip piecing. To create the fence, first we’ll sew together strips and cut up that piecing; then we’ll sew it to additional strips.

Based on 42″ fabric width.

Fabric A (pink): 2 yards for background

Fabric B (gray): ¾yard

Fabric C (white): ½ yard

Backing: 3 yards

Binding: ¾ yard

Please be sure to read Notes on Making the Quilts in This Book (page 6). Label the pieces as you cut.

Fabric A (pink)

1. Cut 1 piece 45½″ × WOF (selvage to selvage).

2. From the piece in Step 1, cut 15½″ × 45½″ parallel to the selvage for the top panel.

3. From the piece in Step 1, cut 22½″ × 45½″ parallel to the selvage for the bottom panel.

4. Cut 2 strips 3″ × WOF; trim A1 and A2.

5. Cut 1 strip 2½″ × WOF; trim A3.

6. Cut 1 strip 3½″ × WOF; trim A4.

7. Cut 1 strip 5½″ × WOF; trim A5.

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Medium 9781607052708

Too Flat

Amy Walsh C&T Publishing ePub

by Janine Burke, 81″ × 95″

I love the architecture in Chicago. Whether it’s residential or commer-I cial, it appeals to my eye. I am frequently inspired by architecture for patterns, and this one is no exception. Playing on the phrase two-flat in reference to apartment-style living, Too Flat represents the many cozy homes throughout the city and surrounding suburbs.

FINISHED BLOCK: 9″ × 5″

FINISHED QUILT: 81″ × 95″

The following yardage makes a queen-size quilt. Refer to the Too Flat chart (page 49) for alternate sizes and yardage requirements.

Assorted batiks: 43 strips 8″ × 42″ or 43 fat quarters

Binding: ¾ yard

Backing: 7¾ yards

Batting: 91″ × 105″

We have included cutting instructions for both 42″strips as well as fat quarters.

TIP

We encourage you to cut just 2 contrasting batiks to begin with so that you can construct a test block. This way you can verify the accuracy of your pieces and you can see how your fabrics are going together.

Each block is constructed of the following pieces:

1 rectangle 1½″ × 5½″ (Unit A)

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Medium 9781571206220

Rainbow Twist

Kim Schaefer C&T Publishing ePub

Quilted by Diane Minkley

FINISHED BLOCK SIZES: 10″ × 10″, 5″ × 5″ FINISHED TABLE RUNNER: 20½″ × 60½″

Going green is easy when you whip up this table runner from a smorgasbord of greens. This scrappy runner is sure to brighten any tabletop.

2 yards total assorted greens for pieced blocks and pieced border

2¼ yards for backing and binding

24″ × 64″ batting

Cut from the assorted greens for the pieced blocks:

5 squares 6½″ × 6½″

10 rectangles 1½″ × 6½″

20 rectangles 1½″ × 8½″

10 rectangles 1½″ × 10½″

Cut from the assorted greens for the pieced border blocks:

84 squares 1½″ × 1½″

112 rectangles 1½″ × 3½″

56 rectangles 1½″ × 5½″

1. Piece the block as shown. Press. Make 5 blocks.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

2. Piece the border block as shown. Press. Make 28 blocks.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

1. Arrange and sew together 5 blocks to form the center of the table runner. Press.

2. Arrange and sew together 2 rows of 10 border blocks to make the side borders. Press.

3. Sew the 2 side borders to the runner top. Press toward the borders.

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Medium 9781571208330

August—Bee Skep Quilt

Kim Schaefer C&T Publishing ePub

Bee Skep Quilt, 20½˝ × 28½˝, made by Kim Schaefer, quilted by Diane Minkley of Patched Works, Inc.

    yard total assorted lights for pieced background and appliqué pieces

    yard total assorted blues for pieced border and appliqué pieces

    yard total assorted yellows and golds for appliqué pieces

    yard each of 2 greens for stems and leaves

   Scraps of 2 purples for flower and flower center

   Scraps of 2 oranges for flower and flower center

    yard black for bees and door

   1 yard for backing and binding

   24˝ × 32˝ batting

   1½ yards paper-backed fusible web

Appliqué patterns are on pattern page P8. Refer to page 3 for preparing the appliqué.

Cut 15 squares 4½˝ × 4½˝ from the assorted tans for the pieced background.

Cut 20 squares 4½˝ × 4½˝ from the assorted blues for the pieced border.

Cut 1 each of appliqué pieces 1–18.

Cut 5 each of appliqué pieces 19–25.

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Medium 9781617450426

Take It In: Take In a Sweater or Knit Top

Suzannah Hamlin Stanley Stash Books ePub

Take It In

Take In a Sweater or Knit Top

This simple alteration project shows one of the most basic, but essential techniques I use. I often find sweaters are too boxy or shapeless, or that the waist is too high for my body. Adjust the side seams of these baggy sweaters with a few quick steps that make a huge difference. I’ve used this technique many times on cardigans, heavier-weight tees, and pullover sweaters to improve their fit.

You Will Need:

•Loose or shapeless tee or sweater

•Standard sewing supplies

•Fabric pen or chalk (optional)

Get It Done

1. Turn the sweater inside out and try it on. Pinch it in as desired at both side seams, approximately the same amount on each side. On one side, place several pins to mark where the narrowest point should be and where it should taper back to the original seam.

2. Press the sweater flat with an iron where you need to take in the seam. Move the pins if necessary to ensure that you capture an equal amount of fabric from the front and back sides and that the original seam is aligned along the side. Create a smooth line with the pins from the original side seam near the armpit to the narrowest point of the new waist, and down to the hip. Use a fabric pen if desired to connect the line between the pins.

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Medium 9781617450242

Circle

Cameli, Christina C&T Publishing ePub

  CIRCLE

The circle is surely one of the most useful shapes in quilting. Circles have an attractive effect when quilted, and they are quite versatile for filling in space. Are your circles lopsided or oval sometimes? Mine too!

Occasionally you’ll leave a circle open. Sometimes many circles will be joined together into pebbling or pebble lines. These types of designs are described further in Pebbling and Traveling.

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