71 Slices
Medium 9781574411935

3. Meat, Fowl, and Seafood

Jean Andrews University of North Texas Press PDF

Meats

Four Old Time Texas Favorites

FRITO PIE

The incomparable, favorite chip, Frito, was originated about 1932 by Elmer Doolin in San Antonio,Texas, in a little old house on

South Flores Street. His wife, Daisy, made the first Frito pie when she dumped her bowl of chili directly into a bag of Fritos.

Her handy innovation caught on with kids of all ages and is still going strong—but has graduated to a bowl. You can use chili made from one of the recipes in this book or just open and heat a can of Wolf Brand ® Chili without beans. Wolf Brand ® Chili is also a native of Texas but now owned by Quaker Oats. If not in your store, order from Wolf Brand Products, P.O. Box 617,

Corsicana,TX, 75151.

Makes—depends on amount of chili on hand.

Fritos

Chili con carne

Onions, chopped

Longhorn cheddar cheese, shredded

Salsa picante

In each individual bowl spread about ¾ cup Fritos and sprinkle onion equally on top. Put equal amounts of hot chili on top of the Fritos and top with cheese. Pass the salsa at the table.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574412185

Basic Ingredients

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press PDF

BASIC INGREDIENTS

CHEESES

MANCHEGO

Use only Mexican Manchego cheese, not Spanish, since the texture is quite different. It can be found in most large supermarkets. If you cannot find Manchego, substitute Monterey Jack.

RANCHERO

Ranchero cheese or Mexican fresh cheese is dry and crumbly. If you cannot find it in a Latin supermarket, substitute dry feta or Parmesan.

CREAM

The recipes in this cookbook use Mexican crema, which can be found in Latin supermarkets.

A close substitute would be crème fraîche, diluted with a little milk, or sour cream.

MEXICAN

LIMES

Mexican limes are Key limes and can be found in most supermarkets throughout the southern United States. If you cannot find them, you’re better off using green limes than lemons.

CHICKEN

STOCK

Here’s the first step in making a good soup.

1. Place a whole cut-up chicken in a large stock pot.

2. Add 1 quartered onion, 1 whole head of garlic, peeled, and 2 stalks of celery.

Cover with water and bring to a boil. Salt to taste.

3. Lower to medium heat and simmer for about an hour or until the chicken is done.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574411935

5. Sauces, Spreads, Dressings, and Pestos

Jean Andrews University of North Texas Press PDF

Sauces

This introduction was in my book The Pepper Trail but it bears repeating.

Sauces are described as every kind of liquid or semi-liquid seasoning for food. They may or may not use spices. The ancient Latin word for broths or soups (sauces) was

“juices” or ius in singular form. The French sauce and the

Spanish and Italian salsa succeeded ius. Sauce is derived from the Latin for salted, saltus. Humans first seasoned their food with salts, then sauces. During the evolution of sauces only the more-or-less liquid consistency has remained relatively constant, with taste being the limitless element. Obviously there are many categories of sauces that have been incorporated into virtually every cuisine.

In medieval European households sauces were mainly served with foods preserved by brining and pickling.These sauces made the foods more palatable, or more tolerable in that period of no refrigeration and slow transportation. In most of the rest of the world they were used as a vehicle for legumes, vegetables, and/or meat that was served with the local starch core—rice, maize, manioc, potatoes, pasta—to make it nutritious and palatable.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780762780983

Front Range

Williams, Lee Globe Pequot PDF

Front Range

p son C a

34

. nA ve

S S t Vr a i

34

257

60

Welch

Reservoir

BREWERIES

Newell

Lake

287

Twin Sisters

Peak East

Terry Lake

66

Buckingham

Park

Boulder

Reservoir

Park

Platt/Rogers

Memorial Park

Gross

Reservoir

119

25

Panama Reservoir

Number 1

52

Boulder

Mountain

Park

Eldorado

Canyon

State Park

De

nv

Marshall

Lake

Bo

6

Idaho

Springs

40

Clear Creek

Canyon Park

Denver 475

Mountain

Park Site

BeerLovers_CO_3pp_CS55.indd 102

6

Genesee

Park

66

103

Mt Galibraith

Park

Elk

Meadow

Park

74

74

i ke

70 10

72

Long Lake

Ranch Park

58

Windy

Saddle Park

Apex Park

70

Matthews/

Winters Park

Red Rocks

Park

Mt Falcon

Park

85

76

270

70

Wheat

Ridge

6

William F Hayden

Green Mountain

Park

121

391

North Dinosaur Park

Bear Creek

Lake Park

2

Rocky

Mountain

ArsenalNational

Wildlife Refuge

Peña Blvd.

Commerce

City

Denver 287

40

2

30

25

95

Denver

International

Airport

470

470

2

6

470

85

Thornton

70

Barr Lake

State Park

Barr Lake

2

36

95

40

76

76

Westminster

93

North Table

Mountain Park

Centennial

Cone Park

Stanley

Lake

8

20 miles

470

44

287

52

10

Broomfield

d

rnp

Standley

Lake

Park

119

40

ul

121

White Ranch

Open Space

Park

46

6

Tu

119 Golden Gate

Canyon

State Park

5

Pumphouse Brewery & Restaurant

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574410761

Pies and Pastries

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

Pies and Pastries

347

BLACK BOTTOM PIE

Prepare and bake a 9-inch Gingersnap Crust [page 359].

1 tablespoon unflavored gelatin

4 tablespoons cold water

2 cups milk

½ cup sugar

1 tablespoon cornstarch

¼ teaspoon salt

4 eggs, separated

2 ounces (2 squares) unsweetened chocolate, melted

1 teaspoon vanilla

Soften gelatin in cold water. Scald milk in double boiler. Mix sugar, cornstarch and salt together, stir slowly into milk and cook until thick.

Add gradually to beaten egg yolks. Return to double boiler and cook

3 minutes longer. Stir in gelatin to dissolve. Divide in half; add melted chocolate and vanilla to one half of the mixture to make chocolate layer. Pour carefully into Gingersnap Crust.

CREAM LAYER

4 egg whites [left over from above]

⅛ teaspoon cream of tartar

½ cup sugar

1 tablespoon rum

1 teaspoon sherry

¾ cup heavy cream

1 tablespoon shaved unsweetened chocolate

Let remaining half of custard cool. Beat egg whites until frothy, add cream of tartar. Continue beating to a soft peak, and gradually add sugar. Fold meringue into cooled custard; add flavorings. Pour carefully over chocolate layer. Chill in refrigerator until set. When ready to serve, whip cream, spread on top of pie, and sprinkle with chocolate

See All Chapters

See All Slices