248 Chapters
Medium 9780253357076

3 Local Specialties, Local Identity

Nir Avieli Indiana University Press ePub

3    Local Specialties, Local Identity

Whenever asked by a Hoianese what exactly I was doing in Hoi An, I would answer that I was studying the town’s eating and drinking culture (van hoa am thuc Hoi An). The common response would be: “Ah, have you had cao lau yet?” For most Hoianese, researching the food in their town meant exploring their local specialties (dac san Hoi An), among which cao lau, a unique noodle dish, is the most prominent.

A book about these local specialties, titled Van Hoa Am Thuc O Pho Co Hoi An (The Culinary Culture of Ancient Hoi An), was published by Hoi An’s municipal research center, stirring some controversy (Tran 2000). Local critics argued that many of the thirty dishes listed were neither unique to Hoi An, nor to Quang Nam Province—and some were not even unique to central Vietnam. There were also debates over dish names, food terms, and even modes of preparation. Yet what I found most intriguing about The Culinary Culture of Ancient Hoi An was that a relatively small town could boast more than thirty local specialties. I later realized that some dishes are considered unique not merely to the district or town but to specific villages (e.g., banh dap Cam Nam [“Cam Nam broken crackers”] or mi quang Cam Chau [“Quang Nam Province noodles in Cam Chau village style”]). Some of the dishes described as unique to Hoi An can in fact be found in other places, where locals are quick to dismiss Hoi An’s claim for exclusivity.

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Medium 9780762780983

Front Range

Williams, Lee Globe Pequot PDF

Front Range

p son C a

34

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S S t Vr a i

34

257

60

Welch

Reservoir

BREWERIES

Newell

Lake

287

Twin Sisters

Peak East

Terry Lake

66

Buckingham

Park

Boulder

Reservoir

Park

Platt/Rogers

Memorial Park

Gross

Reservoir

119

25

Panama Reservoir

Number 1

52

Boulder

Mountain

Park

Eldorado

Canyon

State Park

De

nv

Marshall

Lake

Bo

6

Idaho

Springs

40

Clear Creek

Canyon Park

Denver 475

Mountain

Park Site

BeerLovers_CO_3pp_CS55.indd 102

6

Genesee

Park

66

103

Mt Galibraith

Park

Elk

Meadow

Park

74

74

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70 10

72

Long Lake

Ranch Park

58

Windy

Saddle Park

Apex Park

70

Matthews/

Winters Park

Red Rocks

Park

Mt Falcon

Park

85

76

270

70

Wheat

Ridge

6

William F Hayden

Green Mountain

Park

121

391

North Dinosaur Park

Bear Creek

Lake Park

2

Rocky

Mountain

ArsenalNational

Wildlife Refuge

Peña Blvd.

Commerce

City

Denver 287

40

2

30

25

95

Denver

International

Airport

470

470

2

6

470

85

Thornton

70

Barr Lake

State Park

Barr Lake

2

36

95

40

76

76

Westminster

93

North Table

Mountain Park

Centennial

Cone Park

Stanley

Lake

8

20 miles

470

44

287

52

10

Broomfield

d

rnp

Standley

Lake

Park

119

40

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121

White Ranch

Open Space

Park

46

6

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119 Golden Gate

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State Park

5

Pumphouse Brewery & Restaurant

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Medium 9780253357076

5 Wedding Feasts: From Culinary Scenarios to Gastro-anomie

Nir Avieli Indiana University Press ePub

5    Wedding Feasts

FROM CULINARY SCENARIOS TO GASTRO-ANOMIE

Weddings are the single most important event in Hoianese lives. Complex affairs lasting several days, they involve a huge expenditure of time, effort, and money, in a series of ceremonies that fundamentally alter the social positions of the bride and groom as well as their extended families. Food has an extremely important role and each and every ceremonial stage of a Hoianese marriage is marked by some kind of feast—indeed, guests are literally invited to “eat the wedding” (an cuoi).

Following a brief discussion of “traditional” Vietnamese weddings, this chapter is organized according to the chronological stages of a contemporary Hoianese wedding, but the ceremonies and feasts described belong to separate weddings in different social contexts. Thus, while the sequence in which wedding ceremonies develop from one stage to the next is maintained, there are intra-stage comparisons that stress the prominence of the Hoianese culinary scenario, while modifications that were made to this culinary script under particular social circumstances are singled out for discussion.

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Medium 9781574416282

Stories and Recipes from the Rolling Plains

Frances B. Vick (Editor) University of North Texas Press PDF

Stories and

Recipes from the Rolling

Plains*

This is a region of approximately 24 million acres of alternating woodlands and prairies. The area is half mesquite woodland and half prairie. Mesquite trees have steadily invaded and increased in the grasslands for many years, despite constant control efforts.

Soils range from coarse sands along out-wash terraces adjacent to streams to tight or compact clays on redbed clays and shales.

Rough broken lands on steep slopes are found in the western portion. About two-thirds of the area is rangeland, but cultivation is important in certain localities.

The original vegetation includes big, little, sand and silver bluestems, Texas wintergrass, indiangrass, switchgrass, sideoats and blue gramas, wild-ryes, tobosagrass, and buffalograss on the clay soils.

The sandy soils support tall bunchgrasses, mainly sand bluestem.

Sand shinnery oak, sand sagebrush, and mesquite are the dominant woody plants. Continued heavy grazing contributes to the increase in woody plants, low-value grasses, such as red grama, red lovegrass, tumblegrass, gummy lovegrass, Texas grama, sand dropseed, and sandbur with western ragweed, croton, and many other weedy forbs. Yucca is a problem plant on certain rangelands.

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Medium 9781574414929

This and That

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

This and That

There are always snippets of information left over at the end of every project of this size. Corbitt combined these and placed them at the backs of all but her last cookbook. It proved popular with earlier readers, so I am availing myself of the same opportunity. In an effort to make your hours in the kitchen more effective, here are hints my mother and friends, fine cooks all, have passed along to me. I’ve added a few of my own picked up during a gastronomically satisfying half-century spent in my own kitchens.—Editor

If you don’t own a rolling pin, use a chilled cylindrical bottle of wine to roll pastry.

Something always needs to be grated: chilled citrus fruit is easier to grate. The extra flavor of freshly grated nutmeg and Parmesan cheese make it worth your effort. Either can be grated easily in a hand-held Zyliss or on a Japanese fresh ginger grater. Hard cheeses are easier to grate when they’re at room temperature.

Cream cheese is always worked at room temperature.

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