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Fort Collins

Williams, Lee Globe Pequot PDF

14

287

W Laurel St.

W Myrte St.

W Mulberry St.

W Olive St.

W Oak St.

Maple St.

S Mason St.

E Willox Ln.

8

287

7

50E

14

Fort Collins

E Laurel St.

E Myrte St.

E Mulberry St.

E Olive St.

6 E Oak St.

Springer

Natural

Area

P o u d r e R i v er

Udall

Natural

Area

10

Buckingham St.

14

co

ln

Av e

.

ve rs

ide

Av e

.

11,12

Lin

Nix Natural

Area

me ier

Riv

er

50

d.

9E

9E

Riverband Ponds

Natural Area

R ne

0.75 mile

den

11

9

N Giddings Rd.

9

3

Pateros Creek Brewing Company

4

8

Cranknstein

The Mayor of Old Town

14

E Mulberry Rd.

7

Choice City Butcher & Deli

BARS

5

CooperSmith’s Pub & Brewery

BREWPUBS

2

E Vine Dr.

Odell Brewing Company

Fort Collins Brewery

12

10

Equinox Brewing Company

New Belgium Brewing Company

6

Crooked Stave Brewing Company

Funwerks

1

11

Anheuser–Busch

BREWERIES

1

25

87

25

87

Fort Collins

Mountain Vista Dr.

m

Ri

in

E Mulberry Rd.

EL

0

Williams

Natural

Area

E Vine Dr.

N

50E

Long

Pond

Reservoir

Lindenmeier

Lake

County Club Rd.

Buckingham

Park 9

2

Old Fort Collins

Heritage Park

1

Te r ry L a k e R d .

W il

3 J

St eff

4

Laporte Ave.

. er so n

St

5

W Mountain Ave.

.

Cherry St.

Lee

Martinez

Park

Legacy

Park

W Willox Ln.

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4 Feasting with the Dead and the Living

Nir Avieli Indiana University Press ePub

4    Feasting with the Dead and the Living

Though rituals and festivals have always been at the center of anthropological attention, the special food, elaborate preparations, and eating practices characteristic of such events have often been ignored in anthropological writing or, at best, have been treated as anecdotal or trivial.1 Even Shaun Malarney’s (2001) analysis of war-dead commemorations in Vietnam, which includes detailed descriptions of the ritual and its wartime and postwar transformations, has no more than: “… and then [the mourners] share a communal meal …” (ibid. 68). I argue that the culinary aspects of such ceremonies are at least as meaningful and important as the formal ritual. The analysis of foodways in such events actually sheds light on issues that are often overlooked.

Ancestor-worship ceremonies (dam gio, “death anniversary gatherings,” sometimes referred to as cung ong ba, or literally “worship of grandfather and grandmother”) are the most common family rituals held in Hoi An. As every person has two parents and four grandparents (in some cases even more since, prior to 1975, polygamy was legal and there are several polygamous families in town), most Hoianese conduct or participate in several dam gio rituals annually. While some families worship more than two generations of ancestors (see also Jamieson 1995: 22), this is quite rare in Hoi An. In practice, most Hoianese worship only those ancestors whom they personally knew, while long-deceased ancestors are usually remembered only in more general ancestor-worship events, such as Tet, if at all. Since extended family members, friends, and neighbors are routinely invited to join these rituals, most people participate in well over a dozen such events each year. Indeed, most other Hoianese rituals and festivals include some aspects of ancestor worship. As one of my informants pointed out: “… they say that we are Buddhists or Taoists, but for me, I think that we are ancestor worshipers. This is what we mostly do.”

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Menu 5. NOTHING RHYMES WITH CITRUS

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

51

Tofu-Citrus “Titrus” Dippers

NOTHING RHYMES WITH CITRUS

Citrus

Marinade

½ cup orange marmalade

½ cup fresh lemon juice

½ cup fresh lime juice

2 cups fresh orange juice

1 cup extra-virgin olive oil

2 jalapeo peppers, thinly sliced

4 garlic cloves, grated

2 thumb-size pieces fresh ginger, peeled and grated

Salt and pepper

Two 14-ounce packages extra-firm tofu, drained, pressed (see Efficiency Tip,

page 49), and cut into bite-size cubes

¼

cup

vegan

mayo

Toothpicks

Lemon

and/or

lime

slices,

for

garnish

(optional)

To

make

the

Citrus

Marinade,

in

a

large

bowl,

whisk

together

the

marmalade,

lemon

juice,

lime

juice,

orange

juice,

oil,

jalapeo

pep-

pers,

garlic,

and

ginger.

Season

with

a

healthy

pinch

of

salt

and

pepper.

Transfer

the

marinade

to

one

or

two

large

casseroles

or

zip-top

bags.

Add

the

tofu

cubes

and

submerge

them

in

the

marinade.

Put

the

casseroles

or

bags

in

the

fridge

to

let

the

tofu

marinate

for

at

least

1

hour.

Preheat

the

oven

to

450F.

Line

a

baking

sheet

with

parchment

paper

or

a

Silpat

baking

mat.

Remove

the

tofu

from

the

marinade,

allowing

the

excess

marinade

to

fall

back

into

the

bag.

Be

sure

to

reserve

all

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Menu 15. SATAY-DAY NIGHT FEVER

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

138

The Sexy Vegan’s HAPPY HOUR AT HOME

Tempeh Satay with Peanut Sauce

Two 8-ounce packages tempeh, cut into 3- to 4-inch slices, each about

½ inch thick

½ cup low-sodium tamari

¼ cup mirin

3 garlic cloves, crushed

1 thumb-size piece ginger, peeled and sliced

3 ½ cups water

½ cup arrowroot

½ cup rice flour

1 cup panko bread crumbs

½ cup sweetened coconut shreds

Salt and pepper

2 tablespoons canola or other neutral-flavored oil

16 wooden skewers

Sesame seeds, for garnish

Lime wedges, for garnish

1 ½ cups store-bought peanut sauce or Sexy Peanut Sauce (recipe follows)

In

a

medium

pot,

combine

the

tempeh

slices,

tamari,

mirin,

garlic,

ginger,

and

3

cups

of

the

water,

and

bring

to

simmer

over

medium-

high

heat.

Simmer

for

15

minutes,

until

the

tempeh

has

softened

somewhat.

Then

remove

them

from

the

pot

with

a

slotted

spoon

and

set

aside

to

cool.

Once

the

tempeh

is

cooked,

set

up

your

breading

station.

In

a

medium

bowl,

whisk

together

the

remaining

½

cup

water

and

the

arrowroot.

Spread

out

the

rice

flour

on

a

large

plate.

On

an-

other

large

plate,

mix

together

the

bread

crumbs

and

coconut,

and

season

with

salt

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3. A Liver with Onions

Paula Young Lee Travelers' Tales ePub

Chapter Three

A Liver with Onions

Lord, confound this surly sister

Blight her brow with blotch and blister,

Cramp her larynx, lung and liver

In her guts a galling give her.

J.M. Synge

At this point in a proper romance, the heroine should find herself facing a large obstacle challenging her bliss, such as a rival in stilettos, or an inconvenient war. Since the nineteenth century, the conventions of the genre have been consistent: the heroine runs away from marriage, a clever suitor figures out how to win her, the heroine finally relents, they tie the knot and live happily ever after. From Jane Austen to that Mormon lady who wrote Twilight, authors always make the heroine marry Mr. Right in the end. If he wasnt Mr. Right, the heroine would not have married him.

When the woman ends up with Mr. Wrong, she isnt the heroine but the sidekick. She is there to make the heroine look thin. I didnt want to be heroine or sidekick. I wanted to be Tolstoy, so I started writing about John and turned him into the heroine. Turnabout is fair play. Besides which, he was the one who always wanted to talk about The Relationship, asking me awful things like, How do you feel about us? Where do you see this relationship going? What relationship? Id reply in astonishment. Were living together! hed bellow in disbelief. So? Id retort, and refuse to speak to him until he apologized for being so mean to me.

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