271 Slices
Medium 9781608682348

Menu 6. NEW NEW ENGLAND

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

59

NEW NEW ENGLAND

“Crab” Roll

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Four 20-ounce cans young green jackfruit in water or brine, drained, rinsed,

and roughly chopped (see WTF on page 58)

2 cups water

Two 5-inch pieces wakame (see WTF below)

½ cup finely diced celery

2 scallions, thinly sliced

¼ cup finely diced jicama

¾ cup vegan mayo

½ teaspoon seaweed powder (see WTF, next page)

2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh Italian parsley

Salt and pepper

8 small dinner rolls, split and toasted, if you like

In

a

large

skillet,

heat

the

oil

over

medium-high

heat,

and

add

the

jackfruit.

Don’t

add

any

salt,

since

the

wakame

will

add

a

salty

note

during

the

next

step.

Fry

for

4

to

5

minutes,

or

until

the

jackfruit

be-

gins

to

brown,

then

toss

and

fry

for

5

more

minutes.

Add

the

water

and

wakame,

and

bring

to

a

boil.

Reduce

the

heat

to

medium

and

simmer

for

7

to

8

minutes,

or

until

the

liquid

is

absorbed.

Remove

the

wakame

and

discard.

Raise

the

heat

to

medium-high,

and

fry

the

jackfruit,

stirring

occasionally,

for

8

to

10

minutes,

or

until

the

outsides

and

the

stringy

edges

are

crisp.

Remove

from

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Medium 9781574411362

Luling

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

LULING

We were standing on Main Street, Luling, Texas, waving at the young beautiful belles atop the flower-bedecked floats as they cruised by in parade celebrating the Eleventh Annual Watermelon Thump. The spectators stood under the shade of umbrellas or large straw hats, or huddled under the shady fronts of the stores as the gay caravan interspersed with high school and veteran bands moved along in the hundred-degree summer sun. In the background along Main Street, the pumps on the oilwells were busily going about their business.

In 1922, when oil was first discovered in this area, Luling was a sleepy little town with only about fourteen hundred people, who were principally engaged in farming, railroading, or cattle raising. The arrival of Mr. Edgar B. Davis from his home in Massachusetts stirred this town from its drowsy inactivity.

Six attempts to find the elusive oil in Luling brought Mr. Davis down to the last dollar of his shoe and rubber fortune; but he succeeded in striking oil on the seventh try. From the day this oil well, called Rios No. 1., came in as a great gusher, the city of Luling has steadily progressed.

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Medium 9781623152024

Chapter 2: Savory Breads

Rockridge Press Rockridge Press ePub

2

Some Paleo enthusiasts are adamantly against using yeast in recipes. However, the active yeast used in baking is closely related to the beneficial yeast found in fermented foods, so it can be included without guilt or adverse health reactions. When making this lovely bread, take care because yeast can be a finicky ingredient that needs a very specific temperature to rise. If your water is below 100 degrees F, a leaking amino acid creates a sticky dough, and if the water heats to over 130 degrees F, the yeast will die. This bread is lovely for sandwiches or when toasted with a dab of almond butter.

1. Pour the warm water into a large bowl and sprinkle the yeast on top. Let sit for about 5–10 minutes until the yeast starts to foam.

2. Add the eggs, coconut oil, apple cider vinegar, and honey to the yeast mixture, and stir to combine. Let mixture sit for about 3 minutes.

3. In a medium bowl, stir together the dry ingredients.

4. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and mix, by hand if you have to, until well incorporated.

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Medium 9780762780983

About the Author

Williams, Lee Globe Pequot PDF
Medium 9781574411362

Beaumont

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

BEAUMONT

The Broussards’ house in Beaumont stands empty and silent as the busy traffic of this thriving city in southeast Texas zips by. The blooming magnolia trees appear sad as they stand guard around it. Chessie Taylor lives in a comfortable house surrounded with big fig trees in the side yard. Chessie cooked for the Broussard family for fifty-five years, and of course this is her home.

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Broussard built this spacious home in 1909 for their family of eleven. Needless to say, it was brimming over with the activities of nine healthy children and is remembered as one of the happiest houses in this area. Papa Joe would beam broadly when his entire brood was around the big dining table. Even after the children married, this house was still the gathering place for all of them on special occasions such as birthdays, christenings, and Christmas, and the usual lively pace was even more lively with the hustle of twenty-six grandchildren and more than sixty great-grandchildren.

Joe Broussard was not only the patriarch of this fine family but a very strong force in the development and progress of the Beaumont area. When Joe was a young man, he tended cattle on his mother’s homeplace. He was also the home gardener, for he loved the soil and trusted it. He decided there were big things to be done in farming in that part of Texas. Lumber had been the mainstay in Beaumont in those days, but the pine and cypress trees had pretty well been cut out, and this land, bereft of its timber, was almost abandoned.

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