271 Chapters
Medium 9781623152024

Chapter 4: Flatbreads, Rolls, Muffins, and Pizza Dough

Rockridge Press Rockridge Press ePub
Medium 9781608682348

Menu 5. NOTHING RHYMES WITH CITRUS

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

51

Tofu-Citrus “Titrus” Dippers

NOTHING RHYMES WITH CITRUS

Citrus

Marinade

½ cup orange marmalade

½ cup fresh lemon juice

½ cup fresh lime juice

2 cups fresh orange juice

1 cup extra-virgin olive oil

2 jalapeo peppers, thinly sliced

4 garlic cloves, grated

2 thumb-size pieces fresh ginger, peeled and grated

Salt and pepper

Two 14-ounce packages extra-firm tofu, drained, pressed (see Efficiency Tip,

page 49), and cut into bite-size cubes

¼

cup

vegan

mayo

Toothpicks

Lemon

and/or

lime

slices,

for

garnish

(optional)

To

make

the

Citrus

Marinade,

in

a

large

bowl,

whisk

together

the

marmalade,

lemon

juice,

lime

juice,

orange

juice,

oil,

jalapeo

pep-

pers,

garlic,

and

ginger.

Season

with

a

healthy

pinch

of

salt

and

pepper.

Transfer

the

marinade

to

one

or

two

large

casseroles

or

zip-top

bags.

Add

the

tofu

cubes

and

submerge

them

in

the

marinade.

Put

the

casseroles

or

bags

in

the

fridge

to

let

the

tofu

marinate

for

at

least

1

hour.

Preheat

the

oven

to

450F.

Line

a

baking

sheet

with

parchment

paper

or

a

Silpat

baking

mat.

Remove

the

tofu

from

the

marinade,

allowing

the

excess

marinade

to

fall

back

into

the

bag.

Be

sure

to

reserve

all

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Medium 9781743216781

Artemisa & Mayabeque Provinces

Lonely Planet Lonely Planet ePub

%47 / Pop 885,545

Leap-frogged by almost all international visitors, Cuba’s two smallest provinces, created by dividing Havana province in half in 2010, are the reserve of more everyday concerns – like growing half of the crops that feed the nation, for example. But in amongst the patchwork of citrus and pineapple fields lie a smattering of small towns that will satisfy the curious and the brave.

The most interesting corner is Las Terrazas and Soroa, Cuba’s most successful eco-project and an increasingly important nexus for trekking and bird-watching. East of Havana, Jibacoa’s beaches are the domain of a trickle of Varadero-avoiding tourists who guard their secret tightly. Wander elsewhere and you’ll be in mainly Cuban company (or none at all,) contemplating sugar-plantation ruins, weird one-of-a-kind museums and improbably riotous festivals. For a kaleidoscope of the whole region take the ridiculously slow Hershey train through the nation’s proverbial backyard and admire the view.

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Medium 9781609520809

8. The O in the No

Paula Young Lee Travelers' Tales ePub

Chapter Eight

The O in the No

The cat that cannot reach the meat says it stinks.

Persian proverb.

Seven A.M. Sunday. There is no hunting today, so John is sitting morosely at his breakfast, eating French toast made with warm eggs just laid by the hens. I swear the chickens looked proud of themselves when I went to the henhouse this morning. Some days, they are too busy bickering to notice me hovering by the door in my pajamas and boots. Other times, they press forward, expecting me to give them nice tasty worms. Today, they practically stuck a name tag on each shell so Id know which hen laid which egg. By the time I trundled back to the human house, John was sitting at table, waiting for his breakfast, and reading Uncle Henrys because I hide Guns & Ammo on church day. Uncle Henrys has a Firearms section that he checks religiously. He also looks for snowmobiles, ATVs, and tractors.

His mother wanders in the kitchen, looking for coffee.

Hey Mum, he calls without preamble. You want a peacock?

No, she says flatly.

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Medium 9781743216781

Santiago de Cuba Province

Lonely Planet Lonely Planet ePub

%22 / Pop 1,048,000

Stuck out in Cuba's mountainous 'Oriente' region and long a hotbed of rebellion and sedition, Santiago's cultural influences have often come from the east, imported via Haiti, Jamaica, Barbados and Africa. For this reason the province is often cited as being Cuba's most 'Caribbean' enclave, with a raucous West Indian–style carnival and a cache of folklórico dance groups that owe as much to French-Haitian culture as they do to Spanish.

As the focus of Spain's new colony in the 16th and early 17th centuries, Santiago de Cuba enjoyed a brief spell as Cuba's capital until it was usurped by Havana in 1607. The subsequent slower pace of development has some distinct advantages. Drive 20km or so along the coast in either direction from the provincial capital and you're on a different planet, a land full of rugged coves, crashing surf, historical coffee plantations and hills replete with riotous endemism.

AJuly is the key month in Santiago de Cuba’s cultural calendar, when the city is caliente (hot) in more ways than one. The month begins with the vibrant Festival del Caribe and ends with the justifiably famous Carnaval.

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