271 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781574411362

Luling

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

LULING

We were standing on Main Street, Luling, Texas, waving at the young beautiful belles atop the flower-bedecked floats as they cruised by in parade celebrating the Eleventh Annual Watermelon Thump. The spectators stood under the shade of umbrellas or large straw hats, or huddled under the shady fronts of the stores as the gay caravan interspersed with high school and veteran bands moved along in the hundred-degree summer sun. In the background along Main Street, the pumps on the oilwells were busily going about their business.

In 1922, when oil was first discovered in this area, Luling was a sleepy little town with only about fourteen hundred people, who were principally engaged in farming, railroading, or cattle raising. The arrival of Mr. Edgar B. Davis from his home in Massachusetts stirred this town from its drowsy inactivity.

Six attempts to find the elusive oil in Luling brought Mr. Davis down to the last dollar of his shoe and rubber fortune; but he succeeded in striking oil on the seventh try. From the day this oil well, called Rios No. 1., came in as a great gusher, the city of Luling has steadily progressed.

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Medium 9781574410761

VEAL

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

Veal

177

off all excess flour. Heat the butter and oil and sauté the veal about 5 minutes over medium heat, turning the meat only once. If skillet is not large enough, as soon as first slices are done, pile on a plate and keep warm. Then return all veal to the skillet, add the chicken broth.

Simmer until the liquid is reduced by one-half. Add the lemon juice and the thin slices of lemon. Heat only until lemons are hot. Correct seasonings. Add parsley at the last minute. Serve with the sauce poured over and garnish with the hot lemon slices.

Reader’s Request

One gets a feeling the French see Americans coming and say, “Give them the sauce.” However, the French sauces are delicious, and all generously doused with wine. I must say I think veal dishes are better with a spot of wine added.

VEAL À LA CRÈME

For 6 or 8

1 teaspoon sugar

¼ cup thinly sliced onion

3 pounds lean veal stew meat

1½ cups chicken stock or water

2 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons flour

½ cup dry white wine

½ cup whipping cream

Salt and white pepper

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Medium 9781574411362

Tyler

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

TYLER

We just returned from the Texas Rose Festival in Tyler. It is something one has to experience to really fully realize the grandeur of this annual event. Tyler, now known as the Rose Capital of the World, is a beautiful, small city in East Texas, recognized for many years as the center of aristocratic culture and later as the oil capital of East Texas. Tyler claims also to be the home of the prettiest girls in the world, and this becomes very evident during the Rose Festival, when they are all on hand, not only beautiful but charming and gracious, seeing that all the visitors become a part of these gala festivities. Showers of rose petals constantly flutter down from low-flying airplanes onto the streets, which are already festooned with literally millions of roses. Pretty Tyler girls throw bouquets of roses into the cars of startled visitors arriving in town for the festival.

This year Lucy Ross was the Duchess from Austin. Lucy had been presented at the International Debutante Ball in New York. The parties there were quite lush, but actually nothing can quite compare to the Tyler Rose Festival. She and her mother, Mrs. Ellen Steck Ross, received the design for her fabulous royal robe, invitations to parties, luncheons, dinners and dances, and all pertinent information in advance, with every detail of the arrangements outlined for them. So when they, as well as some twenty other attendants from all parts of the state and country, arrived, all they had to do was to enjoy the elaborately planned affairs on the agenda booked solid for the three-day celebration. The Queen’s Coronation and the Rose Parade, with their inspiring beauty and pageantry, are events none of us will soon forget.

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Medium 9781608682348

Menu 17. GLENNTIL TAMALE BITES

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

M

E

N

U

17

I

have

a

friend.

His

name

is

Glenn.

A

few

years

back,

my

friends

and

I

went

on

a

camp-

ing

trip

to

Montana,

and

on

this

trip

some-

one

came

up

with

the

bright

idea

of

working

the

name

Glenn

into

famous

people’s

names

and

other

words.

It

just

worked

too

well:

Glen-

nifer

Aniston,

Jimmy

Glenndrix,

Glennard

Nimoy,

Harry

and

the

Glenndersons,

Glenntil

Soup,

and,

my

personal

favorite,

Glennjaglenn

Frankglenn.

Years

later,

and

we’re

still

coming

up

with

new

ones.

So

the

great

Crandall,

my

former

cam-

eraman

and

contributor

of

the

epic

belch

you

hear

at

the

end

of

each

Sexy

Vegan

episode,

developed

a

website

as

a

way

to

collect

the

terms

that

we

came

up

with.

If

you

have

a

friend

named

Glenn,

go

to

UrGlenndictionary.com

for

a

good

start

on

Glennded

terms.

You

can

even

submit

your

own.

If

you

don’t

have

a

friend

named

Glenn,

go

find

one

it’ll

be

worth

it.

Anyway,

I

really

love

tamales,

but

they

are

rather

laborious,

and

not

fit

for

a

happy

hour

situ-

ation.

As

douchey

as

I

feel

saying

it,

these

would

be

more

like

(gulp)

“deconstructed”

tamales.

Blech

.

.

.

now

I

have

to

go

wash

my

mouth

out.

L

I

B

A

T

I

O

N

R

E

C

O

M

M

E

N

D

A

T

I

O

N

A

Bloody

Vulcan

(see

recipe,

page 193)

is

per-

fect

for

this

menu,

since

you’ve

already

got

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Medium 9781608682348

Menu 4. GODYAMMIT, THESE SLIDERS ARE HEAVENLY!

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

38

The Sexy Vegan’s HAPPY HOUR AT HOME

Yamburger Sliders

2 large yams, cut crosswise into twelve ½-inch-thick slices

1 heaping tablespoon brown sugar

½ teaspoon ground cumin

½ teaspoon smoked paprika

½ teaspoon ground coriander

½ teaspoon garam masala (see WTF below)

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon pepper

3 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil

12 tiny buns (about 2 inches wide), halved

Tahini Dipping Sauce (see recipe, page 42) for spreading

1 packed cup arugula

1 mango, peeled and cut into 12 very thin slices with

a vegetable peeler or mandoline

12 sandwich toothpicks (“fancy” or “unfancy”)

In

a

large

pot

of

cold

water,

bring

the

yam

slices

to

a

boil

over

high

heat.

Boil

for

6

to

7

minutes,

or

until

the

yams

are

just

fork-tender

but

not

too

soft.

Whilst

your

yams

are

boiling,

in

a

large

bowl,

combine

the

brown

sugar,

cumin,

paprika,

coriander,

garam

masala,

salt,

pepper,

and

2

tea-

spoons

of

the

oil.

Remove

the

yams

from

the

pot

with

a

slotted

spoon,

and

cool

the

slices

in

an

ice

bath

or

under

cold

running

water.

Drain

and

pat

dry

with

a

paper

towel.

Gently

toss

the

yam

slices

in

the

spice-and-oil

mixture

until

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Medium 9780991309405

Chapter 3: Chemical Triggers

Ya-Ling J. Liou Return to Health Press™ PDF

CHAPTER 3

Chemical Triggers of Everyday Pain

INJURY OR STRESS OF A CHEMICAL nature occurs when an area is overwhelmed with cellular waste or byproducts. There is a normal constant flow of cellular waste as the result of our daily metabolic activity. Just as we eat, drink and go to the bathroom on a daily basis, our cells are doing the same thing on a microscopic level. A backup of these waste byproducts can happen during inflammation because of a mechanical tissue injury as previously mentioned, but waste products can also accumulate without any physical injury, at all. This build-up can happen if there is either: (1) Too much cellular waste being produced too quickly;4 or (2)

Elimination of cellular waste is somehow compromised or too slow. Both of these things can happen when the body’s critical biochemical and metabolic processes are being stressed (causing more waste or garbage to result and accumulate) and/or if the

4. Occasionally the body has more “trash” to break down and get rid of. Allergens, viruses, and toxins in the environment can add to the “trash” load in our system.

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Medium 9782067181977

PUGLIA

Michelin Michelin ePub

PUGLIA

Continuous trading relationships with different civilisations, particularly from the Middle East, ensured that this region accumulated a substrate of different customs, cultures and traditions, resulting in a set of unique characteristics. And in its viticulture, too, Puglia was different, cultivating a huge range of grape varieties, many of which were clearly from the East, such as Aleatico, Malvasia, Uva di Troia and Moscato, but prevalently cultivars representative of the region itself, like Negroamaro, Primitivo, Notar Domenico, Susumaniello, Ottavianello, Bianco d’Alessano, Pampanuto and Impigno. Today, after years in which quantity was always considered more important than quality, things are seen differently and Puglian wine is undergoing consistent improvement.

The lovely town of Locorotondo has a DOC zone named after it

REGIONE PUGLIA ASSESSORATO TURISMO E INDUSTRIA ALBERGHIERA

The terroir

In terms of the quantity of wine Puglia produces, it is one of the top regions in Italy, but in terms of image it has to cope with the fact that for a long time its wines were considered second class, and indeed much of its must and wines has not been bottled in the region but sold to strengthen the structure and colour of wines of other regions or countries. However, efforts to upgrade Puglia’s winemaking have brought some very interesting results.

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Medium 9781743216781

Ciego de Ávila Province

Lonely Planet Lonely Planet ePub

%33 / Pop 424,400

Diminutive Ciego de Ávila's finger-in-the-dyke moment came during the late-19th-century Cuban Wars of Independence: it became the site of an impressive fortified wall, the Trocha, built to keep out rebellious armies of the east from the prosperous west. Today, the province continues to be the cultural divide between the Oriente and Occidente. The main reason to stop off is the ambitious post–Special Period resort development of Cayo Coco and Cayo Guillermo. The brilliant tropical pearls that once seduced Ernest Hemingway have had their glorious beaches spruced up and daubed with over a dozen exclusive tourist resorts.

Ciego de Ávila has in reality been harboring intriguing secrets for over a century. Various non-Spanish immigrants first arrived here in the 19th century from Haiti, Jamaica, the Dominican Republic and Barbados, bringing with them myriad cultural quirks, exemplified by cricket in Baraguá, voodoo in Venezuela, country dancing in Majagua and explosive fireworks in Chambas.

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Medium 9781574414868

Los Chiles

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

 

LOS CHILES

Todos los chiles usados en este libro de cocina se encuentran disponibles en la mayor parte de los Estados Unidos. Si no se encuentran en la tienda de comestibles de la localidad, búsquelos en un supermercado latino.

CHILE POBLANO– El poblano es un chile grande, verde oscuro que se usa principalmente para hacer Chiles Rellenos y rajas. El poblano puede variar de poco picante a muy picante, y no se sabe el grado de picante hasta que se come.

CHILE SERRANO– El serrano es muy común en México, especialmente en la región central. Es pequeño, angosto y verde oscuro, muy picante. Los serranos se usan en una amplia variedad de salsas y se pueden comer crudos o cocinados.

CHILE JALAPEÑO– El jalapeño fué uno de los primeros chiles que se introdujeron en el mercado de los Estados Unidos. Es más grande que el serrano, pero con un brillo, color y sabor picante muy parecidos. Los jalapeños se pueden encontrar todo el año y con frecuencia se sirven preparados con verduras en escabeche.

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Medium 9781574414868

Basic Ingredients

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

BASIC INGREDIENTS

CHEESES

MANCHEGO

Use only Mexican Manchego cheese, not Spanish, since the texture is quite different. It can be found in most large supermarkets. If you cannot find Manchego, substitute Monterey Jack.

R ANCHERO

Ranchero cheese or Mexican fresh cheese is dry and crumbly. If you cannot find it in a Latin supermarket, substitute dry feta or Parmesan.

CREAM

The recipes in this cookbook use Mexican crema, which can be found in Latin supermarkets. A close substitute would be crème fraîche, diluted with a little milk, or sour cream.

MEXICAN LIMES

Mexican limes are Key limes and can be found in most supermarkets throughout the southern United States. If you cannot find them, you’re better off using green limes than lemons.

CHICKEN STOCK

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Medium 9781623152024

Chapter 7: The Trouble with Gluten

Rockridge Press Rockridge Press ePub

7

We’ve discussed many of the health benefits of switching to a Paleo diet, but one of the main benefits is that the foods enjoyed in the Paleo diet don’t have gluten in them. For millions of people worldwide, eating caveman-style is a relatively simple way to avoid digestive upset and even the cancers that are caused by an allergy to gluten.

Latin for “glue,” gluten is a protein found in wheat and grains that gives ground flours elasticity and helps them to rise. It’s also the binding component that gives bread its chewy texture and keeps it from crumbling apart after baking. Gluten can be removed from flour because it is insoluble in water. Typically when you remove the gluten, you also lose all of the good properties that make breads and cakes what they are.

Without gluten, your baked goods won’t rise and they’ll have a grainy, crumbly texture. They won’t taste anything like their gluten-laden cousins, and you probably won’t want to eat more than the first bite. Because of an increasing demand for gluten-free products, food corporations have dedicated a tremendous amount of time and money into creating tasty, effective, gluten-free products. Unfortunately, most commercially prepared gluten-free recipe mixes still fall short.

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Medium 9781574414868

Index

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

I NDEX

A

Amaranth Water, 205

Avocados

—Beef in Avocado Salsa, 141

—Guacamole, 55

—Orange, Papaya, and Avocado Salad, 79

B

Beans

—Black Bean Soup, 29

—“Pot” Beans, 175

Beef

—Beef in Avocado Salsa, 141

—Beef with Chile Pasilla Salsa, 129

—Meatballs in Chipotle Salsa, 145

—Mexican Beef Tips, 137

—Steak with Roasted Poblano Chiles and Onion, 133

Beverages, 195–205

—Amaranth Water, 205

—Celery Water, 203

—Cucumber Mint Cooler, 201

—Fresh Melon Water, 197

—Hibiscus Water, 199

Black Bean Soup, 29

Brandied Mangoes, 193

C

Cauliflower with Spicy Tomatoes, 177

Celery Water, 203

Chayote

—Chayote and Chile Poblano Soup, 37

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Medium 9781623152024

Chapter 1: 10 Tips for Paleo Baking

Rockridge Press Rockridge Press ePub
Medium 9781574410761

Appetizers

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

Appetizers

21

Appetizers

The cocktail party has become the American way of turning everyone into a “Blithe Spirit.” How we do it depends entirely on the host—or hostess. Informality is its purpose, as munching on such oddments before or in place of a meal should keep conversation on the lighter and brighter things of the day.

Where to serve? Anywhere—the living room, the back porch, the kitchen; anywhere your guests or family choose to light.

If you are interested in its family tree, go to the Russian Zakouska.

Being a hearty race, before dinner the Russians gather around a sideboard in a room adjoining the dining room and partake of all kinds of special pastries, smoked fish and such, with much conversation and strong drink. The French Hors d’oeuvre, the Scandinavian

Smörgåsbord, the Italian Antipasto, all are offshoots of the Zakouska.

. . . I like to keep [the cocktail tidbit] as uncomplicated in flavor as possible, freshly made, cold and crisp—or hot—as the case may be. . . .

These few ideas, I think, will answer for all kinds of tastes, for the hostess who has time, or not much time; an unlimited budget, or just a few spare dimes. I think you should let guests pile as high and wide as they like, so very few of these ideas are to be spread on silly little squares of this and that by the hostess beforehand.

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Medium 9782067181977

Appendix

Michelin Michelin ePub

Appendix

INDEX OF SITES

A

Abano Terme   1

Acciaroli   1

Aci Sant’Antonio   1

Acqui Terme   1

Acuto   1

Adrano   1

Agliano Terme   1

Agliè   1

Agropoli   1

Alanno   1

Alassio   1

Alatri   1

Alba   1

Albano Laziale   1

Albenga   1

Alberese   1

Alberobello   1

Albissola Marina   1

Albugnano   1

Alcamo   1

Alghero   1

Alicudi   1

Altissimo   1

Amalfi   1

Anagni   1

Anchiano   1

Ancona   1

Andalo   1

Andora Castello   1

Andria   1

Annia   1

Annone Veneto   1

Anzio   1

Aosta   1

Appiano sulla Strada del Vino   1

Appignano   1

Apricale   1

Arbatax   1

Arbizzano   1

Arcevia   1

Arco   1

Arco Felice   1

Arcole   1

Arezzo   1

Argentario Promontory   1

Ariccia   1

Arpaia   1

Arquà Petrarca   1

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