315 Slices
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Medium 9781933671192

A. A Vegetarian Main Dish

Joe Kissell Take Control Books ePub

Most of the dishes in this book are vegetarian (though only the cranberry sauce is vegan). The exceptions are the turkey (naturally), the gravy, and the stuffingthough the stuffing can be made vegetarian by substituting vegetable broth for the chicken broth and cooking it outside the turkey. In other words, if you want to serve vegetarians, the main thing you need to do is replace (or supplement) the turkey with an alternative main dish.

There are lots of delicious, autumn-themed, vegetarian main dishes one could make, but were looking for something that fits in well with the rest of the meal, thats easy to make, and that will look at least slightly impressive on the table next to, or instead of, a roasted turkey. Ive received numerous suggestions, and Id like to share two options that received particularly strong votes.

Yes, it has a goofy name and has been the butt of many jokes, but this product made from tofu, wheat, beans, and natural flavorings has evolved over the years to have a pretty impressiveif not quite turkey-likeflavor and texture. The entire Tofurky product line is vegan, too, so this should satisfy just about anyones dietary needs.

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Medium 9781574411362

Greenville

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

GREENVILLE

It is a beautiful drive from Dallas to Greenville, over the rolling north-central Texas farmland. On that June morning everything was fresh and green after a muchly needed rain. We were invited to Greenville as guests for the fiftieth wedding anniversary celebration of Colonel and Mrs. Hal Horton. Colonel Horton’s grandfather acquired the family homestead Puddin’ Hill, located two miles east of Greenville, in 1839 as payment for his services in the Texas Revolutionary War. The following winter, to provide food for his family of seventeen, he and some neighbors set out on a deer hunt. Five miles out, a Texas “blue norther” struck, forcing them to seek shelter for several days with an old sutler (early day term for storekeeper). Until they could proceed, poker became the favored pastime. As a result of one game, Hal’s grandfather won the entire stock of the store. Packing the horseshoe nails, needles, pins, buttons, beeswax, flint and spices in his saddle bags, he rode home, dumped his winnings on his wife’s bed and said: “Now Mary, we will open a store of our own and lead society in this part of Texas for a while.”

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Medium 9781574411362

Luling

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

LULING

We were standing on Main Street, Luling, Texas, waving at the young beautiful belles atop the flower-bedecked floats as they cruised by in parade celebrating the Eleventh Annual Watermelon Thump. The spectators stood under the shade of umbrellas or large straw hats, or huddled under the shady fronts of the stores as the gay caravan interspersed with high school and veteran bands moved along in the hundred-degree summer sun. In the background along Main Street, the pumps on the oilwells were busily going about their business.

In 1922, when oil was first discovered in this area, Luling was a sleepy little town with only about fourteen hundred people, who were principally engaged in farming, railroading, or cattle raising. The arrival of Mr. Edgar B. Davis from his home in Massachusetts stirred this town from its drowsy inactivity.

Six attempts to find the elusive oil in Luling brought Mr. Davis down to the last dollar of his shoe and rubber fortune; but he succeeded in striking oil on the seventh try. From the day this oil well, called Rios No. 1., came in as a great gusher, the city of Luling has steadily progressed.

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Medium 9781933671192

G. Day before Thanksgiving

Joe Kissell Take Control Books ePub
Medium 9781574410761

QUICK BREADS

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

82

The Best From Helen Corbitt’s Kitchens

QUICK BREADS

[All-purpose flour should be used in all these quick bread recipes except crêpes. See page xiii for further information.—Editor]

Reader’s Request

POPOVERS

10 to 12

1 cup sifted all-purpose flour

¼ teaspoon salt

2 eggs

⅞ cup milk [1 cup less 2 tablespoons]

1 tablespoon melted butter

[Preheat oven to 450°.] Heavily butter muffin tins or custard cups and put in the oven to get hot. Mix the flour and salt. Beat eggs until light, add milk and butter and add slowly to the flour. Stir until well blended. Beat 2 minutes with rotary beater if by hand, or 1 minute with an electric beater. Fill the cups one-third full. Bake 20 minutes, then reduce heat to 350º and bake 15 minutes more. Don’t peek!

Serve hot with marmalade.

A standard muffin recipe serves the same purpose as your basic roll or biscuit recipes.

STANDARD MUFFIN RECIPE

12 medium or 24 minis

2 cups sifted flour

4 teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons sugar

2 eggs, well beaten

1 cup milk

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Medium 9781609520809

16. Fish Heaven

Paula Young Lee Travelers' Tales ePub

Chapter Sixteen

Fish Heaven

[Pliny] fashions the name of good mother to the Earth, because having compassion for us, she instituted poisons.

Pierre Gassendi, Concerning Happiness, 1647

The first Sunday of No Hunting after the winter snow has melted, John wants to show me where he shot the buck. Look, he points at the ground. You can still see the blood.

Except I cant. Theres just leaves and more leaves layered thickly over moss.

Look, he points again, and waves his arms around. Its all over the place.

I shake my head. Nope. The earth has drunk deeply. He is seeing a memory.

Exasperated, he kneels down and starts jabbing at an oak leaf, one of maybe a hundred oak leaves I could grab if I just stood in one spot and started raking with my hands. There, his index finger waggles. Now do you see?

Myopic, I bend over and squint. Theres some blotches that could be a stain from spit-up baby food. Well, yah, I agree peevishly. Now that youre pointing right at it, I can see the blood, I lie. But its just a drop!

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Medium 9781574415889

Desserts

Kim Stanford and Bill Backhaus University of North Texas Press ePub

DESSERTS

Life is too short. Eat dessert first. The end of the meal is Kim’s favorite time: sitting around the table with a cup of freshly brewed coffee and sharing a grand-finale dessert with family or friends.

Previously, gluten-free desserts were like eating raw corn grits with sugar baked on them, then set out in the sun for a couple of days and, of course, freeze-dried for a couple of months. They were dry as concrete, tasteless, and so different from regular desserts.

Finally, we have gluten-free desserts that are simple to make and so incredibly rich and moist they melt in your mouth.

Gluten-free flours, while opening the door to divine gluten-free desserts, are more challenging to bake with than traditional white flour. Figuring out the exact measurements for rice, potato, or corn flour can get very complicated because you cannot just substitute one cup of gluten-free flour for one cup of traditional wheat flour. Moreover, gluten-free flours do not rise like wheat flours; indeed, they tend to flop. Kim has spent many hours covered in gluten-free flour to perfect these recipes that we are pleased to offer. They are shockingly moist. And they’re so good, you’ll forget they’re gluten-free.

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Medium 9781608682348

Menu 12. CHARRED AND ROASTED

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

M

E

N

U

12

I

can’t

get

enough

broccolini.

When

prepared

properly

(as

I’m

about

to

show

you),

there’s

nothing

better

than

those

al

dente

stalks,

with

crispy,

slightly

blackened

florets

on

the

ends.

Broccolini

is

great

either

by

itself;

tossed

with

pasta,

garlic,

and

olive

oil;

or

on

a

pizza.

For

this

happy

hour,

I

serve

broccolini

alongside

roasted

peppers

stuffed

with

hummus

and

aru-

gula,

and

crackers

with

sunflower

seed

spread.

L

I

B

A

T

I

O

N

R

E

C

O

M

M

E

N

D

A

T

I

O

N

I

really

like

the

Burn

Relief

(see

rec-

ipe, page 199)

or

the

Figgy

Lifting

Drink

(see recipe, page 194)

for

this

menu,

as

they

nicely

balance

the

charred,

smoky

flavors.

E

F

F

I

C

I

E

N

C

Y

T

I

P

This

menu

is

pretty

fast

no

matter

what,

but

using

a

store-bought

hum-

mus

for

the

Roasted

Pepper

Rolls

makes

things

even

faster.

Blanch

the

broccolini

first,

then

tackle

the

rest

of

the

menu

while

it

dries.

Once

the

rolls

and

Sunflower

Seed

Spread

are

ready

to

go,

finish

the

broccolini

and

serve.

W

T

F

is

broccolini?

Believe

it

or

not,

it

is

not

simply

young

broccoli.

It’s

actually

a

natural

hybrid

of

broccoli

and

gai-lan

(also

called

Chinese

broccoli).

It

has

a

slightly

sweet

flavor,

so

when

you

grill

it,

you

have

a

great

bal-

ance

of

the

sweet

with

the

smoky

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Medium 9781449309046

4. Utensils

Kevin Kelly Maker Media, Inc ePub

I always used a spoon, until I was given one of these lid poppers. I was skeptical, but I now find myself reaching for it without even thinking. An 8.5 5-cm piece of metal, its bent in the middle and curved at each end to accommodate just about any size jar lid.

Its very simple and straightforward: Simply place it on the jar top with either of the rolled sides caught under the lids lip (which side of the opener depends on the lid size); Then, hold the opener in place and use it as a lever. The bend in the metal serves as the fulcrum. The downward pressure of your hand provides enough force to release the vacuum seal without distorting the lid. I can happily report no more bent spoon handles, no more splatters, and no more spills. Just a nice pop when the vacuum breaks, and Im home free.

I have not tried the previously-reviewed plastic JarPop, but Ive had this steel one for at least 3 years. It has never bent, nor has it rusted.

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Medium 9781574410761

Beverages

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

Beverages

45

HOT CHOCOLATE

For 20

⅔ cup cocoa

¾ cup sugar

½ teaspoon salt

1 cup water

3 quarts scalded milk

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 cup cream, whipped

[Ground cinnamon (optional)]

Mix cocoa, sugar, salt and water. Add to the scalded milk and beat with a rotary or wire whip. Return to heat and bring to a boil.

Remove; add vanilla and pour into warm cups. Put a teaspoon of whipped cream on top. A touch of cinnamon in the cream for grownups who indulge.

Eggnog is as personal as you make it. This one is mine. I remember the first time I made it, for the Houston Country Club Woman’s Golf

Association Christmas party. They were sure a Yankee couldn’t, but afterwards this recipe was always used.

EGGNOG

For 30

24 eggs, separated

2 cups sugar

1 quart bourbon

1 pint brandy

1 quart heavy cream

2 quarts milk

1 quart vanilla ice cream

Nutmeg

Beat the egg yolks and sugar until thick. Add the bourbon and brandy and stir thoroughly. . . . Add the cream and milk and continue whipping. Break up the ice cream and add. Beat the egg whites until stiff and fold in. Refrigerate if possible for 30 minutes before serving.

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Medium 9781574410761

Dessert Sauces

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

316

The Best From Helen Corbitt’s Kitchens

The extravagant corner of your emergency shelf should contain a jar of

Melba Sauce—to dress up canned fruits and vanilla or peach ice cream for the unexpected guests. Or make your own! It is such a pretty color.

MELBA SAUCE

1 cup

1 cup frozen raspberries and juice, defrosted

1 teaspoon sugar

1 teaspoon cornstarch

[½ cup currant jelly (optional)]

Mix raspberries, sugar and cornstarch; cook over low heat until clear.

Strain through a fine sieve and cool. The addition of ½ cup currant jelly gives a sparkle to its color.

The famous Peach Melba is a good company dessert; it is merely vanilla or peach ice cream mounded in the center of half a canned or fresh stewed peach and covered with Melba Sauce. Named for the famous singer.

Reader’s Request

I am always amused at the sophisticates who ask for this recipe. When they find it has peanut butter in it, the reaction is always the same—

”Oh, Helen, really!”

PEANUT BUTTER SAUCE

2 cups

1 cup sugar

1 tablespoon white corn syrup

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Medium 9781574414868

Los Chiles

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

 

LOS CHILES

Todos los chiles usados en este libro de cocina se encuentran disponibles en la mayor parte de los Estados Unidos. Si no se encuentran en la tienda de comestibles de la localidad, búsquelos en un supermercado latino.

CHILE POBLANO– El poblano es un chile grande, verde oscuro que se usa principalmente para hacer Chiles Rellenos y rajas. El poblano puede variar de poco picante a muy picante, y no se sabe el grado de picante hasta que se come.

CHILE SERRANO– El serrano es muy común en México, especialmente en la región central. Es pequeño, angosto y verde oscuro, muy picante. Los serranos se usan en una amplia variedad de salsas y se pueden comer crudos o cocinados.

CHILE JALAPEÑO– El jalapeño fué uno de los primeros chiles que se introdujeron en el mercado de los Estados Unidos. Es más grande que el serrano, pero con un brillo, color y sabor picante muy parecidos. Los jalapeños se pueden encontrar todo el año y con frecuencia se sirven preparados con verduras en escabeche.

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Medium 9781608682348

Menu 19. BOMBERS AND BREAD BOWLS

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

M

E

N

U

19

R

unning

a

close

second

to

edible

utensils

as

my

favorite

things

in

the

world

are

ed-

ible

bowls.

And

this

dip

is

served

in

one.

I

used

to

go

to

a

local

place

called

BJ’s

when

I

was

in

college,

and

it

had

something

called

Bongo

Bongo

Dip

its

signature

creamy,

cheesy

arti-

choke

and

spinach

dip.

I

wanted

to

re-create

it

as

best

I

could,

and

I

think

this

version

is

even

better.

BJ’s

also

served

a

drink

called

the

BJ’s

Bomber.

It

came

in

a

giant

chalice

and

con-

tained

eleven

shots

of

various

alcohols

and

a

splash

of

a

sugary

fruit

juice

all

poured

over

ice.

That’s

all

for

one

person.

It

had

a

round

slice

of

orange

floating

on

top

of

it,

which

was

piled

with

sugar

and

set

ablaze

with

Bacardi

151.

And

as

if

eleven

shots

of

booze

weren’t

enough,

we

would

have

“Bomber

races”:

twelve

newly

21-year-old

jackasses

and

jackassettes

slurp-

ing

giant

red

drinks

through

straws

as

fast

as

we

could,

stopping

every

so

often

to

cringingly

stave

off

brain

freeze.

Winning

was

inconse-

quential,

as

we

were

all

shitfaced

within

eight

minutes.

I

swear,

I

did

go

to

class

in

college

.

.

.

and

I

actually

got

kind

of

decent

grades.

L

I

B

A

T

I

O

N

R

E

C

O

M

M

E

N

D

A

T

I

O

N

I

thought

I

would

re-create

the

BJ’s

Bomber

to

go

with

this

menu,

but

then

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Medium 9781449309046

8. Quick Tips

Kevin Kelly Maker Media, Inc ePub

Everyone knows the worst part about baking bread: Having to clean up the sticky, floury mess from counter tops, bowls, and utensils. The gluey mass refuses to come out of sponges, and gums up anything it touches.

I recently discovered a solution: The netting that onions and other vegetables come packaged in. By cutting up the stiff netting into about 6-inch squares you can make reusable super scrubbing tools. A few bags will produce more than youll need. When youre finished scrubbing, just rinse off the gunk, recycle the netting, and marvel at your flour- and cheese-free sponges.

I cook a lot and like to use garlic. One downside of properly cleaning and chopping and slicing garlic is the smell permeates your skin. Years ago, I heard on NPR that if you rubbed your hands under cold water with something made of stainless steel, the smell would be eliminated. I didnt believe it, but it works. You can buy fancy soap-shaped or garlic-shaped stainless steel objects to do this with, but no need. Go into your drawer and get out a butter knife or spoon instead. This really works!

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Medium 9781574416282

Stories and Recipes from the High Plains

Frances B. Vick (Editor) University of North Texas Press PDF

Stories and

Recipes from the High

Plains*

The High Plains, some 19 million treeless acres, are an extension of the Great Plains to the north. Its level nature and porous soils prevent drainage over wide areas.

The relatively light rainfall flows into the numerous shallow

“playa” lakes or sinks into the ground to feed the great underground aquifer that is the source of water for the countless wells that irrigate the surface of the plains. A large part of this area is under irrigated farming, but native grassland remains in about onehalf of the High Plains.

Blue grama and buffalograss comprise the principal vegetation on the clay loam “hardland” soils. Important grasses on the sandy loam “sandy land” soils are little bluestem, western wheatgrass, indiangrass, switchgrass, and sand reedygrass. Sand shinnery oak, sand sagebrush, mesquite, and yucca are conspicuous invading brushy plants.

*Stephan L. Hatch, Texas Almanac, 2014–2015, Elizabeth Cruce Alvarez, editor (Austin: Texas State Historical Association), 117. Used with permission of Texas State Historical Association.

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