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Medium 9781609520809

16. Fish Heaven

Paula Young Lee Travelers' Tales ePub

Chapter Sixteen

Fish Heaven

[Pliny] fashions the name of good mother to the Earth, because having compassion for us, she instituted poisons.

Pierre Gassendi, Concerning Happiness, 1647

The first Sunday of No Hunting after the winter snow has melted, John wants to show me where he shot the buck. Look, he points at the ground. You can still see the blood.

Except I cant. Theres just leaves and more leaves layered thickly over moss.

Look, he points again, and waves his arms around. Its all over the place.

I shake my head. Nope. The earth has drunk deeply. He is seeing a memory.

Exasperated, he kneels down and starts jabbing at an oak leaf, one of maybe a hundred oak leaves I could grab if I just stood in one spot and started raking with my hands. There, his index finger waggles. Now do you see?

Myopic, I bend over and squint. Theres some blotches that could be a stain from spit-up baby food. Well, yah, I agree peevishly. Now that youre pointing right at it, I can see the blood, I lie. But its just a drop!

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Medium 9781743216781

Granma Province

Lonely Planet Lonely Planet ePub

%23 / Pop 836,400

Few parts of the world get named after yachts, which helps explain why in Granma (christened for the boat in which Fidel Castro and his bedraggled revolutionaries clambered ashore to kick-start a guerrilla war in 1956), Cuba's viva la Revolución spirit burns most fiercely. This is the land where José Martí died and where Granma native Carlos Manuel de Céspedes freed his slaves and formally declared Cuban independence for the first time in 1868.

The alluringly isolated countryside helped the revolutionary cause. Road-scarce Granma is one of Cuba's remotest regions, with lofty tropical mountains dense enough to have harbored a fugitive Fidel Castro for over two years in the 1950s.

Its isolation has bred a special brand of Cuban identity. Granma's settlements are esoteric places enlivened with weekly street parties (with outdoor barbecues and archaic hand-operated street organs), and provincial capital Bayamo is among the most tranquil and clean places in the archipelago.

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Medium 9781574414929

Pies and Pastries

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

Pies and Pastries

Next time you make a cream pie, any kind, put a layer of whipped cream on top, then the meringue and you have three textures to savor. Or you may substitute ice cream for the whipped cream.

BLACK BOTTOM PIE

Prepare and bake a 9-inch Gingersnap Crust [page 359].

1 tablespoon unflavored gelatin

4 tablespoons cold water

2 cups milk

1/2 cup sugar

1 tablespoon cornstarch

1/4 teaspoon salt

4 eggs, separated

2 ounces (2 squares) unsweetened chocolate, melted

1 teaspoon vanilla

Soften gelatin in cold water. Scald milk in double boiler. Mix sugar, cornstarch and salt together, stir slowly into milk and cook until thick. Add gradually to beaten egg yolks. Return to double boiler and cook 3 minutes longer. Stir in gelatin to dissolve. Divide in half; add melted chocolate and vanilla to one half of the mixture to make chocolate layer. Pour carefully into Gingersnap Crust.

CREAM LAYER

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Medium 9782067181977

THE WORLD OF WINE

Michelin Travel & Lifestyle Michelin Travel & Lifestyle ePub

Discovering Wine

THE WORLD OF WINE

Wine is a marvellous creature, born of expert alchemy in which nature and culture, terroir and savoir-faire concur. The best wines hail from designated terrain, but the vignaiolo’s – or winegrower’s – ability to understand it and achieve the best product from each vintage is the wine producer’s signature, the individual touch that gives each wine its typical quality and uniqueness. Thus begins our adventure to discover this rich and complex world: at the end of our journey we shall be able to appreciate the nectar of Bacchus, celebrated over the centuries at tables, in culture and in art.

Davide Bretti/SHUTTERSTOCK

Notions of viticulture

From plant to fruit via the terrain and its composition. In order to understand wine we must go from the ground up, as the morphological, chemical and climactic characteristics of the soil the fruit is grown in are the first elements that distinguish it. The typical characteristics of the different vine species then join these to develop the product.

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Medium 9781574412185

Chiles

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press PDF

CHILES

All the chiles used in this cookbook are readily available in most parts of the United States. If you cannot find them at your local grocery store, try a Latin supermarket.

POBLANO CHILE– A large, deep green chile mainly used for making Chiles Rellenos and roasted pepper strips (rajas). The poblano can vary from mild to hot, not giving away its true heat until you bite into it.

SERRANO CHILE– The serrano is very common in Mexico, especially in the central region. It is small, narrow, and dark green in color with an intense heat. Serranos are used in a wide variety of salsas and can be eaten either cooked or raw.

J

C

ALAPEÑO HILE The jalapeño was one of the first chiles introduced to the U.S. market. It is larger than a serrano, but with the same shiny, green color and spiciness.

Jalapeños can be found year-round and are often served pickled with vegetables (en escabeche).

CHIPOTLE CHILE– Chipotle chiles are ripened, smoke-dried jalapeños. They can be found either in their dried state or canned in a marinade (chipotles en adobo). Either way the chipotle is considered to be very hot.

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Medium 9780762780983

Fort Collins

Williams, Lee Globe Pequot PDF

14

287

W Laurel St.

W Myrte St.

W Mulberry St.

W Olive St.

W Oak St.

Maple St.

S Mason St.

E Willox Ln.

8

287

7

50E

14

Fort Collins

E Laurel St.

E Myrte St.

E Mulberry St.

E Olive St.

6 E Oak St.

Springer

Natural

Area

P o u d r e R i v er

Udall

Natural

Area

10

Buckingham St.

14

co

ln

Av e

.

ve rs

ide

Av e

.

11,12

Lin

Nix Natural

Area

me ier

Riv

er

50

d.

9E

9E

Riverband Ponds

Natural Area

R ne

0.75 mile

den

11

9

N Giddings Rd.

9

3

Pateros Creek Brewing Company

4

8

Cranknstein

The Mayor of Old Town

14

E Mulberry Rd.

7

Choice City Butcher & Deli

BARS

5

CooperSmith’s Pub & Brewery

BREWPUBS

2

E Vine Dr.

Odell Brewing Company

Fort Collins Brewery

12

10

Equinox Brewing Company

New Belgium Brewing Company

6

Crooked Stave Brewing Company

Funwerks

1

11

Anheuser–Busch

BREWERIES

1

25

87

25

87

Fort Collins

Mountain Vista Dr.

m

Ri

in

E Mulberry Rd.

EL

0

Williams

Natural

Area

E Vine Dr.

N

50E

Long

Pond

Reservoir

Lindenmeier

Lake

County Club Rd.

Buckingham

Park 9

2

Old Fort Collins

Heritage Park

1

Te r ry L a k e R d .

W il

3 J

St eff

4

Laporte Ave.

. er so n

St

5

W Mountain Ave.

.

Cherry St.

Lee

Martinez

Park

Legacy

Park

W Willox Ln.

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Medium 9781574410761

This and That

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

This and That

There are always snippets of information left over at the end of every project of this size. Corbitt combined these and placed them at the backs of all but her last cookbook. It proved popular with earlier readers, so I am availing myself of the same opportunity. In an effort to make your hours in the kitchen more effective, here are hints my mother and friends, fine cooks all, have passed along to me. I’ve added a few of my own picked up during a gastronomically satisfying half-century spent in my own kitchens.—Editor

If you don’t own a rolling pin, use a chilled cylindrical bottle of wine to roll pastry.

Something always needs to be grated: chilled citrus fruit is easier to grate. The extra flavor of freshly grated nutmeg and Parmesan cheese make it worth your effort. Either can be grated easily in a hand-held Zyliss or on a Japanese fresh ginger grater. Hard cheeses are easier to grate when they’re at room temperature.

Cream cheese is always worked at room temperature.

You can judge the amount of butterfat in cheese by its firmness; hard cheese has less. Never heat no-fat cheese; the gum arabic used in it does just what its name implies.

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Medium 9781574411362

Houston

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

HOUSTON

Houston is undoubtedly one of America’s most exciting cities and is one of the crossroads of the world. It seems incredible today that once this city was almost abandoned. For in 1836, Mexican General Santa Anna hurried his troops across this site, stopping only long enough to burn Harrisburg, which was the lumber-port town on Buffalo Bayou where Houston now stands. It was also on this ground that Texas General Sam Houston and his volunteer army of nine hundred Texans clashed with Santa Anna’s trained troops of more than twelve hundred. However, the Mexicans suffered a disastrous defeat in this battle which lasted only a few explosive minutes! History calls this one of the decisive battles of the world, as it not only freed Colonial Texas, but gave Texas a vast domain from which one-third of the state would eventually be carved and added to the Union. Today this battleground is a state park and is marked with the nation’s tallest monument.

Hardly had the smoke of the battle cleared when two New York real estate men, brothers, John K. and Augustus C. Allen, decided to establish a city at the headwater of Buffalo Bayou, eighteen miles upstream from the San Jacinto battleground. They paid $1.00 per acre to the pioneer family of Stephen F. Austin for the town-site, and named their daring and hopeful venture after the heroic General Houston. The Allen brothers began to promote Houston prospects with great flair in newspapers circulated throughout the North and East. Success was slow; at first only a trickle of immigrants flowed into the Southwest, then a stream and finally a wave of populace flooded the area. The Allen brothers’ most extravagant promises have long since been overshadowed by the extraordinary stature their infant city has attained, as today Houston ranks seventh in population among cities in the United States. It blends rich traditions of the Old West with the freshness of a modern, youthful city—like the colorful rodeos and livestock expositions and the new six-million-dollar Performing Arts Hall.

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Medium 9781574412185

Recetas

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781623152024

Chapter 1: 10 Tips for Paleo Baking

Rockridge Press Rockridge Press ePub
Medium 9781743216781

Artemisa & Mayabeque Provinces

Lonely Planet Lonely Planet ePub

%47 / Pop 885,545

Leap-frogged by almost all international visitors, Cuba’s two smallest provinces, created by dividing Havana province in half in 2010, are the reserve of more everyday concerns – like growing half of the crops that feed the nation, for example. But in amongst the patchwork of citrus and pineapple fields lie a smattering of small towns that will satisfy the curious and the brave.

The most interesting corner is Las Terrazas and Soroa, Cuba’s most successful eco-project and an increasingly important nexus for trekking and bird-watching. East of Havana, Jibacoa’s beaches are the domain of a trickle of Varadero-avoiding tourists who guard their secret tightly. Wander elsewhere and you’ll be in mainly Cuban company (or none at all,) contemplating sugar-plantation ruins, weird one-of-a-kind museums and improbably riotous festivals. For a kaleidoscope of the whole region take the ridiculously slow Hershey train through the nation’s proverbial backyard and admire the view.

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Medium 9781574411362

People Are Here!

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

PEOPLE ARE HERE!

“Mama! People are here!” The “People are here!” cry rang through the house with much excitement, relayed by various sizes of children with the same alarm as “The British are coming!” People were here! Lots of people had always been here at Green Pastures as long as I could remember. There were five of us children who had grown up in the big frame country house: nieces, nephews and cousins had come to live with us while attending school in Austin, and many others whose extended “visits” had lasted anything up to three years. If clients of my father were lonely, he’d send them out for a week or two’s “pepper-upper” with his favorite diet of *Hot Water Corn Bread and the fresh buttermilk which Mama churned daily. But this time when the people were here, it was different. These people would be paying to be at Green Pastures—we were in business.

I had always been the one in the family to be in charge of getting ready for company dinner, planning the parties, decorating the house—after recruiting all sorts of “free” help, of course. I remember so well getting ready for a party Camille Long and I gave when we were in junior high school. Colored bread had just come into style, and Good Housekeeping magazine had a section on party sandwiches. We made pink and green ribbon sandwiches, solid pink rolled sandwiches, and pink and white checkerboard sandwiches—all day! We also made pecan fudge with heavy cream. We had an electric milk separator which separated the milk from the cream, and this cream was much heavier than whipped cream and made terrific fudge. We also thought it would really be gay to give out fancy paper caps at the party, such as we’d seen at a New Year’s Eve party in a movie; so we cut the colored crepe paper and white tissue paper for fringed tassels, but didn’t have time to put them together, as making the sandwiches and fudge had taken the entire day. I desperately took all the cap-makings in to Captain Tally and Daddy, who were upstairs visiting. Captain Tally was eighty-five years old and had been a trail-driver all his life. Making party caps wasn’t quite his forte—neither was it Daddy’s, which he made clear as he disapprovingly wrapped the thread to secure the tassel on the end of the cap and expounded on how we were spending entirely too much time on the frivolities of life. I donned my pink organdy party dress with picoted ruffles and sallied down the stairs to greet the guests who were coming to dance to the music of our new Panatrope—which Daddy had taken as payment for a case.

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Medium 9781623152024

Chapter 6: The Benefits of Paleo

Rockridge Press Rockridge Press ePub

6

Many people turn to the Paleo diet because of the weight-loss benefits, but that’s not where the idea originated. If you remember, the diet was created by a gastroenterologist to help his patients with various disorders. Of course, weight loss is a wonderful side effect that has its own set of healthy benefits.

When you add in the myriad other perks, going caveman is almost a no-brainer. Let’s take a quick peek at some of the biggest health benefits of following a Paleo diet.

Because this is one of the primary reasons many people decide to switch to a Paleo diet, we’ll start here. Because you’re eliminating empty carbs and adding in lots of healthful plant fiber and lean protein, losing weight will be much easier. A few other factors that contribute to healthy weight loss include:

The bottom line is you will be consuming foods that help your body function the way that it’s supposed to, and one of the natural side effects of that is weight loss.

The theory behind the Paleo diet is that eating grains, dairy, and other foods on the excluded list can cause digestive upset, inflammation, and discomfort because our bodies aren’t adapted to eating them. Also, your digestive tract needs fiber to help it sweep food through your system, otherwise it builds up and causes problems. Some of the conditions that may be improved by going caveman include:

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Medium 9781574411362

Tyler

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

TYLER

We just returned from the Texas Rose Festival in Tyler. It is something one has to experience to really fully realize the grandeur of this annual event. Tyler, now known as the Rose Capital of the World, is a beautiful, small city in East Texas, recognized for many years as the center of aristocratic culture and later as the oil capital of East Texas. Tyler claims also to be the home of the prettiest girls in the world, and this becomes very evident during the Rose Festival, when they are all on hand, not only beautiful but charming and gracious, seeing that all the visitors become a part of these gala festivities. Showers of rose petals constantly flutter down from low-flying airplanes onto the streets, which are already festooned with literally millions of roses. Pretty Tyler girls throw bouquets of roses into the cars of startled visitors arriving in town for the festival.

This year Lucy Ross was the Duchess from Austin. Lucy had been presented at the International Debutante Ball in New York. The parties there were quite lush, but actually nothing can quite compare to the Tyler Rose Festival. She and her mother, Mrs. Ellen Steck Ross, received the design for her fabulous royal robe, invitations to parties, luncheons, dinners and dances, and all pertinent information in advance, with every detail of the arrangements outlined for them. So when they, as well as some twenty other attendants from all parts of the state and country, arrived, all they had to do was to enjoy the elaborately planned affairs on the agenda booked solid for the three-day celebration. The Queen’s Coronation and the Rose Parade, with their inspiring beauty and pageantry, are events none of us will soon forget.

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Medium 9782067181977

PIEDMONT

Michelin Travel & Lifestyle Michelin Travel & Lifestyle ePub

PIEDMONT

Piedmont means “at the foot of the mountains”, which is an exact description of the geography of the region. But the mountains are just one aspect of Piedmont. The rest of the region has a great deal to offer: hills planted with vineyards, rivers, lakes, modern cities, medieval hamlets, ancient castles and ultramodern buildings. It is home to some of the world’s most highly prized wines. They are at times difficult, austere and a little rugged, but gradually they reveal their secret nature in the glass, rewarding the patient wine-lover.

The sunny slopes of the Langhe in autumn

Per gentile concessione Vincenzo Lonati/GRIBAUDO

The terroir

Grapes are grown in much of the region and produce numerous types of wine, many of which are very well known, such as Barolo, Barbaresco, Asti Spumante, Barbera and Nebbiolo, to mention only a few.

Piedmont is one of Italy’s most productive regions and has the greatest number of DOC appellations. It is also the area with the highest percentage of VQPRD wines (Quality Wines Produced in Specified Regions), a definition that groups the DOC and DOCG zones. Regardless of numbers and statistics, what must be underlined is that wine is an integral part of the culture of the Piedmonts. The preferred varieties are Nebbiolo, Dolcetto, Barbera, Freisa, Arneis, Cortese, Brachetto, Favorita and Moscato. The principal wine production areas are Monferrato, the Langhe, Roero and Alto Piemonte.

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