232 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781574411935

2. Breads, Savory Tarts, and Pastas

Jean Andrews University of North Texas Press PDF

Introduction to Breads, Savory Tarts, and Pastas

Choosing the Right Flour

Flour is the finely powdered particles of any substance; in this case it is finely ground particles of cereal grains used for making breads. The word “flour” comes from the

“flower” or the best part of the grain left after milling. Here we refer specifically to flour made from wheat (Triticum) although there are many others.Wheat flours may look alike, but there are important differences that make some better than others for certain cooking jobs. Should you use unbleached all-purpose flour, cake flour, or bread flour for pie crusts, crisp cookies, or crusty light breads? A few facts will clarify the difference between flours.

Cereal grains are the seed-like fruits from the grass family of plants. Several were among the first cultivated crops. It is generally believed that domestication of cereal grains was a prerequisite to civilization. Today about a dozen of the thirty-five cultivated grains are significant, of which barley, wheat, rye, oats, rice, corn, and sorghum are probably the most important. First barley, then wheat, both popular in biblical times, were domesticated in the

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Medium 9781574414929

Appetizers

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

Appetizers

The cocktail party has become the American way of turning everyone into a “Blithe Spirit.” How we do it depends entirely on the host—or hostess. Informality is its purpose, as munching on such oddments before or in place of a meal should keep conversation on the lighter and brighter things of the day.

Where to serve? Anywhere—the living room, the back porch, the kitchen; anywhere your guests or family choose to light.

If you are interested in its family tree, go to the Russian Zakouska. Being a hearty race, before dinner the Russians gather around a sideboard in a room adjoining the dining room and partake of all kinds of special pastries, smoked fish and such, with much conversation and strong drink. The French Hors d’oeuvre, the Scandinavian Smörgåsbord, the Italian Antipasto, all are offshoots of the Zakouska. . . . I like to keep [the cocktail tidbit] as uncomplicated in flavor as possible, freshly made, cold and crisp—or hot—as the case may be. . . . These few ideas, I think, will answer for all kinds of tastes, for the hostess who has time, or not much time; an unlimited budget, or just a few spare dimes. I think you should let guests pile as high and wide as they like, so very few of these ideas are to be spread on silly little squares of this and that by the hostess beforehand.

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Medium 9781574411362

Greenville

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

GREENVILLE

It is a beautiful drive from Dallas to Greenville, over the rolling north-central Texas farmland. On that June morning everything was fresh and green after a muchly needed rain. We were invited to Greenville as guests for the fiftieth wedding anniversary celebration of Colonel and Mrs. Hal Horton. Colonel Horton’s grandfather acquired the family homestead Puddin’ Hill, located two miles east of Greenville, in 1839 as payment for his services in the Texas Revolutionary War. The following winter, to provide food for his family of seventeen, he and some neighbors set out on a deer hunt. Five miles out, a Texas “blue norther” struck, forcing them to seek shelter for several days with an old sutler (early day term for storekeeper). Until they could proceed, poker became the favored pastime. As a result of one game, Hal’s grandfather won the entire stock of the store. Packing the horseshoe nails, needles, pins, buttons, beeswax, flint and spices in his saddle bags, he rode home, dumped his winnings on his wife’s bed and said: “Now Mary, we will open a store of our own and lead society in this part of Texas for a while.”

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Medium 9781574415889

Eggs, Cheese, and Pasta

Kim Stanford and Bill Backhaus University of North Texas Press ePub

EGGS, CHEESE, AND PASTA

Our egg, cheese, and pasta dishes are distinctly creative, healthy, and guaranteed to keep you going all day . . . or night. Many cultures around the world serve egg dishes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. The French are especially appreciative of beautiful eggs. And why not? Eggs are a rich, gluten-free source of protein and adaptable in so many recipes. We prefer fresh, local, organic, cage-free eggs. For breakfast, Gisela’s Huevos Rancheros Especiales is always a favorite. Our Feta, Spinach, Artichoke, and Sun-Dried Tomato Frittata has just enough kick for that morning jump-start. Or, to keep it simple, add our Gruyère and Asiago Cheese Biscuits to straight-up bacon and eggs.

We also love cheese, as you can see. Eggs-and-cheese and pasta-and-cheese are naturals together. But many cheeses and especially packaged shredded cheeses include gluten as an anti-caking agent. So when you shop, look for aged block cheeses; try a good cheddar, Parmesan or Romano. Just check the labels for additives and flavorings. If you are a blue cheese addict, you may also want to check the source of mold.

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Medium 9782067181977

THE WORLD OF WINE

Michelin Michelin ePub

Discovering Wine

THE WORLD OF WINE

Wine is a marvellous creature, born of expert alchemy in which nature and culture, terroir and savoir-faire concur. The best wines hail from designated terrain, but the vignaiolo’s – or winegrower’s – ability to understand it and achieve the best product from each vintage is the wine producer’s signature, the individual touch that gives each wine its typical quality and uniqueness. Thus begins our adventure to discover this rich and complex world: at the end of our journey we shall be able to appreciate the nectar of Bacchus, celebrated over the centuries at tables, in culture and in art.

Davide Bretti/SHUTTERSTOCK

Notions of viticulture

From plant to fruit via the terrain and its composition. In order to understand wine we must go from the ground up, as the morphological, chemical and climactic characteristics of the soil the fruit is grown in are the first elements that distinguish it. The typical characteristics of the different vine species then join these to develop the product.

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Medium 9781574412185

Recetas

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781608682348

Menu 1. HOLY STROMBOLI

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

M

E

N

U

1

U

p

until

I

became

a

vegan,

stromboli

was

an

integral

part

of

my

life.

When

it

was

din-

nertime

in

my

house,

we

had

the

choice

of

pizza,

stromboli,

pizza,

or

pizza,

and

that

was

about

it.

A

stromboli

is

essentially

a

tube

of

pizza,

or

an

elongated

calzone,

and

serves

about

four

to

six

people

or

one

fat

twelve-year-old.

A

strom-

boli

is

usually

filled

with

ham,

salami,

pepperoni,

peppers,

onions,

and

cheese.

In

college

I

had

the

(un)fortunate

situation

of

living

right

next

door

to

a

pizza

place.

Lunch

usually

consisted

of

a

Rico

Boli

(a

mini

stromboli,

with

basically

one

of

every

animal

in

it),

garlic

cheese

bread,

and

an

order

of

dough

fritz

(fried

dough

topped

with

powdered

sugar).

In

fact,

my

nickname

became

Dough

Fritz

sometimes

shortened

to

Dough,

or

Fritz.

What

a

life

I

had

carved

out

for

myself!

How

I

made

it

out

of

there

alive,

I’ll

never

know.

So

you

may

know

the

glory

that

is

stromboli,

I

have

created

a

vegan

version.

L

I

B

A

T

I

O

N

R

E

C

O

M

M

E

N

D

A

T

I

O

N

To

accompany

this

delicacy,

just

grab

what-

ever

floaters

of

shitty

light

beer

are

left

on

your

coffee

table

from

the

night

before

and

make

sure

there

are

no

cigarette

butts

floating

in

the

cup.

If

you

didn’t

happen

to

throw

a

rager

in

your

living

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Medium 9781608682348

Menu 20. QUESOME MUCHO

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

180

The Sexy Vegan’s HAPPY HOUR AT HOME

Hatch Chile Queso

4 fresh Hatch chiles or two 4-ounce cans diced green chiles

2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil

6 ounces Soyrizo or 1 ½ cups Tempeh Chorizo (recipe follows)

1 ½ cups whole raw cashews

1 garlic clove

½ teaspoon onion powder

1 cup vegetable stock, plus more as needed

1 teaspoon turmeric

¼ cup nutritional yeast

Salt and pepper

2 Roma tomatoes, seeded and diced

Tortilla chips

Cilantro sprig or sliced scallions, for garnish

If

using

fresh

chiles,

you

must

roast

them.

Over

a

medium

grill

or

skillet,

roast

the

fresh

chiles,

turning

occasionally,

until

blackened

on

all

sides.

Place

the

roasted

chiles

in

a

paper

bag

with

the

top

closed

or

in

a

bowl

covered

with

plastic

wrap.

Let

the

chiles

steam

for

at

least

15

minutes,

which

further

cooks

them

and

makes

the

skin

easier

to

remove.

Remove

most

of

the

charred

skin

and

seeds

from

the

chiles.

Do

not

rinse

under

water,

as

you’ll

be

rinsing

away

flavor.

Dice

the

chiles

and

set

aside,

reserving

1

tablespoon

for

the

Fresh

Tomatillo

Salad

dressing

(see

recipe,

page 185).

If

you’re

using

Soyrizo,

in

a

medium

skillet,

heat

the

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Medium 9781608682348

Menu 2. BE STILL, MY HEARTS OF PALM

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub
Medium 9781608682348

Menu 15. SATAY-DAY NIGHT FEVER

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

138

The Sexy Vegan’s HAPPY HOUR AT HOME

Tempeh Satay with Peanut Sauce

Two 8-ounce packages tempeh, cut into 3- to 4-inch slices, each about

½ inch thick

½ cup low-sodium tamari

¼ cup mirin

3 garlic cloves, crushed

1 thumb-size piece ginger, peeled and sliced

3 ½ cups water

½ cup arrowroot

½ cup rice flour

1 cup panko bread crumbs

½ cup sweetened coconut shreds

Salt and pepper

2 tablespoons canola or other neutral-flavored oil

16 wooden skewers

Sesame seeds, for garnish

Lime wedges, for garnish

1 ½ cups store-bought peanut sauce or Sexy Peanut Sauce (recipe follows)

In

a

medium

pot,

combine

the

tempeh

slices,

tamari,

mirin,

garlic,

ginger,

and

3

cups

of

the

water,

and

bring

to

simmer

over

medium-

high

heat.

Simmer

for

15

minutes,

until

the

tempeh

has

softened

somewhat.

Then

remove

them

from

the

pot

with

a

slotted

spoon

and

set

aside

to

cool.

Once

the

tempeh

is

cooked,

set

up

your

breading

station.

In

a

medium

bowl,

whisk

together

the

remaining

½

cup

water

and

the

arrowroot.

Spread

out

the

rice

flour

on

a

large

plate.

On

an-

other

large

plate,

mix

together

the

bread

crumbs

and

coconut,

and

season

with

salt

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Medium 9781608682348

Menu 5. NOTHING RHYMES WITH CITRUS

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

51

Tofu-Citrus “Titrus” Dippers

NOTHING RHYMES WITH CITRUS

Citrus

Marinade

½ cup orange marmalade

½ cup fresh lemon juice

½ cup fresh lime juice

2 cups fresh orange juice

1 cup extra-virgin olive oil

2 jalapeo peppers, thinly sliced

4 garlic cloves, grated

2 thumb-size pieces fresh ginger, peeled and grated

Salt and pepper

Two 14-ounce packages extra-firm tofu, drained, pressed (see Efficiency Tip,

page 49), and cut into bite-size cubes

¼

cup

vegan

mayo

Toothpicks

Lemon

and/or

lime

slices,

for

garnish

(optional)

To

make

the

Citrus

Marinade,

in

a

large

bowl,

whisk

together

the

marmalade,

lemon

juice,

lime

juice,

orange

juice,

oil,

jalapeo

pep-

pers,

garlic,

and

ginger.

Season

with

a

healthy

pinch

of

salt

and

pepper.

Transfer

the

marinade

to

one

or

two

large

casseroles

or

zip-top

bags.

Add

the

tofu

cubes

and

submerge

them

in

the

marinade.

Put

the

casseroles

or

bags

in

the

fridge

to

let

the

tofu

marinate

for

at

least

1

hour.

Preheat

the

oven

to

450F.

Line

a

baking

sheet

with

parchment

paper

or

a

Silpat

baking

mat.

Remove

the

tofu

from

the

marinade,

allowing

the

excess

marinade

to

fall

back

into

the

bag.

Be

sure

to

reserve

all

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Medium 9782067181977

CALABRIA

Michelin Michelin ePub

CALABRIA

A combination of almost nothing but mountains and coastline, Calabria is a region of enormous beauty that greatly repays the effort invested to explore its geography and gastronomy. Called Enotria by the ancient Greeks due to its thriving viticulture, today Calabria cultivates an abundance of varieties. The most common black grapes are Gaglioppo, Magliocco, Marsigliana, Nerello Mascalese, Prunesta, Sangiovese and Alicante, and among the whites Greco Bianco, Mantonico, Pecorello and Guardavalle. The local varieties are of course joined by international cultivars, in particular, Cabernet, Merlot, Syrah, Chardonnay and Sauvignon. Grapes are also grown high on the Sila plateau, allowing Calabria to claim the record for the highest vineyards in Europe.

A promontory under vine at Bagnara Calabra on the “Violet Coast”

B. Ienco/PROLOCO BAGNARA CALABRA

The terroir

Despite a glorious past, the image today of Calabria’s winemaking industry has deteriorated due to the excessive division of the vineyards into small plots and the production of wine in bulk. Happily the situation is changing thanks to a reappraisal of the value of local varieties and the improved quality of the grapes and production methods. New growing and cellar techniques are being introduced to replace obsolete methods.

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Medium 9782067181977

SARDINIA

Michelin Michelin ePub

SARDINIA

Sardinia has always been open to commercial and cultural exchange: in consequence, having also been conquered by the Phoenicians, Romans, Spanish and Piedmontese, the island has been strongly marked by the passage of other peoples of the Mediterranean, even in its viticulture. The range of native varieties is enormous and includes Bovale, Cannonau, Carignano, Monica, Girò, Cagnulari, Pascale, Nuragus, Nasco, Seminano, which, with others like Vermentino, Moscato, Malvasia and Vernaccia, are used to produce the region’s most important wines. However, despite this wide assortment, the cultivars that are most representative of Sardinia are essentially two: Vermentino and Cannonau.

The wild coastline of the island of San Pietro

E. Locci/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

Sardinian wines are generally of good quality, well structured, fairly alcoholic, full flavoured and complex in terms of taste and smell. The inherent interest of the production zone is heightened by its varied character. Appreciation of the native varieties has always been broad and the island’s traditional wines have never been forgotten or neglected.

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Medium 9781574414929

Cheese and Eggs

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

Cheese and Eggs

In the sixteenth century a Bishop of Paris was authorized by a bull from Pope Julius III to permit the use of eggs during Lent. The Parliament took offense and prevented the execution of the mandate. From this severe abstinence from eggs during Lent arose the custom of having a great number of them blessed on Easter Eve, to be distributed among friends on Easter Sunday.

SWISS CHEESE SOUFFLÉ

For 8 to 10

[If you plan to serve this with Oriental Chicken [page 134], use American (Cheddar) cheese rather than Swiss and add 1/4 teaspoon of White Wine Worcestershire sauce.]

1/2 cup butter

6 tablespoons flour

2 cups milk

2 cups grated Swiss cheese

8 eggs, separated [at room temperature]

1-1/2 teaspoons dry mustard or 1 tablespoon prepared Dijon mustard

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 teaspoon salt

Parmesan cheese (may be omitted)

[Preheat oven to 350°.] Melt the butter, add the flour and cook slowly until mixture foams. Do not brown. [Gradually] add the milk, [stirring constantly], and bring to a boil; use low heat to ensure the flour and milk being thoroughly cooked. The sauce should be smooth and thick. Remove from heat. Add the [Swiss] cheese and stir until blended. Cool slightly. Beat the egg yolks and add to the mixture. Add the mustard, cayenne and salt. Let mixture cool until you can place your hand on the bottom of the container without feeling any heat. Beat the egg whites until stiff but not dry. (Tip the bowl and if the whites do not slide out, they are ready.) Stir gently about one third of the egg whites into the mixture, then fold in remaining egg whites until well distributed. Pour into a 2-1/2- or 3-quart buttered soufflé dish sprinkled lightly with Parmesan cheese or into two 1-1/2- quart ones. Bake for 30 minutes if you are going to eat at once, or place in a pan of hot water and bake 1 hour, and it will hold awhile.

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Medium 9781574414929

Entrée Sauces

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

Entrée Sauces

The sauce to meat is ceremony, according to Lady Macbeth. But what would the ceremony be without the sauce? I’m sure the hostess who serves a really superb sauce feels at times that she is playing god to the mortals who partake of it. And why not? It takes patience to make a sauce that will enhance, not disguise.

Any sauce, whether simple or complex, takes time—to blend the proper proportions of fat, flour or egg yolks, and whatever liquid goes into it. A good rule in blending is to follow your sauce recipe, and carefully; but let your imagination inspire your seasoning.

Reader’s Request

A sauce to make a fish dish a delectable entrée any day, and especially for company.

IMPERIAL SAUCE

2-1/2 cups

2 tablespoons finely chopped onion

1/4 cup finely diced mushrooms

1 tablespoon butter

1 cup Thick Cream Sauce [opposite page]

1 cup mayonnaise

1 teaspoon lemon juice

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