271 Slices
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9782067181977

THE MARCHES

Michelin Travel & Lifestyle Michelin Travel & Lifestyle ePub

THE MARCHES

The revival and enhancement in the quality of native grape varieties is the goal that the Marches is working towards and there is no shortage of results. One obvious example is that the region’s wines are no longer represented by Verdicchio alone. Since 2004 the surge in new appellations – Vernaccia di Serrapetrona DOCG, Conero DOCG, Offida DOCG, Terreni di Sanseverino DOC, Pergola DOC and San Ginesio DOC – has demonstrated the dynamic changes the local wine industry is experiencing. The discovery near Ascoli Piceno of fossilised remains of Vitis vinifera, dating from the Iron Age, are a clear indication of the long history viticulture has in the region, which, thanks to its soil composition and the mildness of the climate, offers ideal conditions for winemaking.

The gentle hills around Jesi

Claudio Giovanni Colombo/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

Despite the presence of international grape varieties like Chardonnay, Pinot Bianco and Pinot Nero, it is the native cultivars that triumph in the Marches. Verdicchio has always been the standard bearer for the region, which acquires unique qualities near Matelica and in the zone of Castelli di Jesi thanks to the very special characteristics of the soil and climate. Here Verdicchio grapes create white wines with a greenish tinge (whence its name), with scents of acacia flowers, hawthorn, peach, apple and citrus fruits. Known and appreciated abroad, Verdicchio is refreshing and zesty in the mouth, with an aftertaste reminiscent of almonds.

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Medium 9781743216781

Varadero & Matanzas Province

Lonely Planet Lonely Planet ePub

%45 / Pop 692,536

With a name translating as 'massacres,' Matanzas province conceals an appropriately tumultuous past beneath its modern-day reputation for glam all-inclusive holidays. In the 17th century pillaging pirates ravaged the region's prized north coast, while three centuries later, more invaders grappled ashore in the Bahía de Cochinos (Bay of Pigs) under the dreamy notion that they were about to liberate the nation.

The Bahía de Cochinos attracts more divers than mercenaries these days, while sunbathers rather than pirates invade the northern beaches of Varadero, the vast Caribbean resort and lucrative economic 'cash cow' that stretches 20km along the sandy Península de Hicacos.

Providing a weird juxtaposition is the scruffy city of Matanzas, the music-rich provincial capital that has gifted the world with rumba, danzón, countless grand neoclassical buildings and Santería (the province is the veritable cradle of Afro-Cuban religion). Tourists may be scant here outside of Varadero, but soulful, only-in-Cuba experiences are surprisingly abundant.

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Medium 9781609520809

17. Ham Supper for 227

Paula Young Lee Travelers' Tales ePub

Chapter Seventeen

Ham Supper for 227

I like pigs. Dogs look up to us. Cats look down on us. Pigs treat us as equals.

Sir Winston Churchill

Ow, Patrick announces, as everyone sits down to Sunday supper at the Big House. I just bit on something.

Buckshot, John says calmly.

But Im eating potatoes, Patrick protests.

Buckshot, John repeats, and reaches for another serving of venison chop suey.

So tell me about the wedding! I prod Patrick.

We got married, Patrick shrugs, still chewing with a slightly puzzled expression on his face. Then we fished at the lake.

Thats it?

Yep.

You still doing the pig roast?

Yep.

What about the pig? I poke him. Have you got one yet?

Nope, he replies. If I bring a pig home early, Christy will start cooing over it and before you know it, it will be another Bucky. And then Ill just have to get another pig to roast.

Just to be clear, Bucky wasnt a pig. He was a dog stuck in the body of a goat.

It is a truism of animal husbandry that certain animals come in pairs. The dove is one of them. The goat is another. Even if herds of other friendly animals are around, a single goat will not do well on its own. The specifics of the pair dont matter: It can be girl-girl, boy-boy, boy-girl, old-young, big-small, or black-white. They just both have to be goats, preferably two of the same kind, and not an Archy and Mehitabel kind of pair (a cockroach and an alley cat, in case you were wondering). Bucky thought he was a dog. So did all his friends. Wagging his tail, Bucky followed Patrick wherever he went. Begging to be petted, Bucky lived inside the house and shed on the couch. But one day, while nobody was home and he was all alone, he died. Death deprived him of his amazing powers of mind control, and behold! Bucky was returned back to being a goat. It was very upsetting.

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Medium 9781311572385

Weeks 13-24 - Guide 2.0

Kayla Itsines Kayla Itsines ePub
Medium 9782067181977

TRENTINO ALTO ADIGE

Michelin Travel & Lifestyle Michelin Travel & Lifestyle ePub

TRENTINO ALTO ADIGE

Trentino is a region of immense appeal to all lovers of nature and the mountains. Viticulture has been practised with excellent results along the course of the river Adige for centuries. International varieties such as Chardonnay, Riesling, Sauvignon, Pinot, Cabernet, Merlot, Gewürztraminer, Müller Thurgau and Sylvaner are cultivated with great success, but it is the native varieties, such as Schiava, Nosiola, Lagrein and Marzemino, that are more interesting as they are more representative of the territory and part of its culture and tradition. Sparkling wines known around the world are produced under the appellation Trento DOC. Another of the region’s enological treasures is Vino Santo, a sweet wine of great charm produced in very limited quantity. Proud and strongly rooted in its traditions and culture, Alto Adige has two faces, Italian and Mitteleuropean. Grapes are the zone’s principal crop and its magnificent landscape is spread with rows of vines. Here the wines develop intense, complex aromas as a result of the large and sudden swings in temperature, daily and seasonally. In Alto Adige sharing a bottle of wine in company is a long established and deeply appreciated pleasure, and in autumn it is wine that provides the theme for a traditional series of convivial meetings: the Törggelen – a name derived from the Latin word torculum, meaning wine press – is the custom of touring the local cellars to taste the new wine and enjoy roast chestnuts, homemade bread, charcuterie, cheeses and other local foods.

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Medium 9781609520809

1. A Kormic Explanation

Paula Young Lee Travelers' Tales ePub
Medium 9781574412185

Basic Ingredients

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press PDF

BASIC INGREDIENTS

CHEESES

MANCHEGO

Use only Mexican Manchego cheese, not Spanish, since the texture is quite different. It can be found in most large supermarkets. If you cannot find Manchego, substitute Monterey Jack.

RANCHERO

Ranchero cheese or Mexican fresh cheese is dry and crumbly. If you cannot find it in a Latin supermarket, substitute dry feta or Parmesan.

CREAM

The recipes in this cookbook use Mexican crema, which can be found in Latin supermarkets.

A close substitute would be crème fraîche, diluted with a little milk, or sour cream.

MEXICAN

LIMES

Mexican limes are Key limes and can be found in most supermarkets throughout the southern United States. If you cannot find them, you’re better off using green limes than lemons.

CHICKEN

STOCK

Here’s the first step in making a good soup.

1. Place a whole cut-up chicken in a large stock pot.

2. Add 1 quartered onion, 1 whole head of garlic, peeled, and 2 stalks of celery.

Cover with water and bring to a boil. Salt to taste.

3. Lower to medium heat and simmer for about an hour or until the chicken is done.

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Medium 9781574414868

Secretos para una alimentación saludable

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

SECRETOS PARA UNA ALIMENTACIÓN SANA

La alimentación sana fue la que nos enseñaron en casa cuando éramos niños. Nos dijeron que debíamos seguir una dieta balanceada, comer verduras y que el postre se reservaba únicamente para ocasiones especiales. Desafortunadamente, en el mundo moderno el concepto de la buena alimentación ha cambiado. Hemos reemplazado las comidas nutritivas hechas en casa con comida rápida y nuestras alacenas están llenas de productos procesados y llenos de químicos. Todo es abundante, fácil de preparar (o por lo menos es lo que prometen las instrucciones de los paquetes) y alguien más realiza la mayor parte del trabajo. Esto hace que cocinar todo desde un principio, utilizando frutas y verduras e ingredientes de buena calidad parezca demasiado difícil y que no vale la pena perder el tiempo en ello. Este libro le demostrará que preparar comida nutritiva en casa es fácil, rápido y que vale la pena hacer el esfuerzo.

Más que 50 por ciento de la población de los Estados Unidos está excedida de peso. La nueva epidemia nacional es la obesidad, la cual es la causa directa de muchas enfermedades: cardiopatías, derrames cerebrales (embolias), diabetes, alta presión arterial, depresión y osteoartritis (400,000 muertes al año se relacionan con la obesidad). Las personas consumen más calorías de las que queman, por lo general en alimentos procesados, azúcaresy carbohidratos. Nuestro estilo de vida sedentario es parte del problema, junto con las porciones cada vez más grandes que sirven en los restaurantes (Aumentar el precio y el tamañode la porción finalmente resulta en mayores ganancias para los restaurantes). Si para redondear su “dieta moderna” toma algunos refrescos embotellados, o alguna otra bebida dulce es muy probable que tenga un problema de exceso de peso. México sigue los pasos de su vecino del norte y las enfermedades relacionadas con el sobrepeso, especialmente la diabetes, van en aumento.

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Medium 9781608682348

Menu 1. HOLY STROMBOLI

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

M

E

N

U

1

U

p

until

I

became

a

vegan,

stromboli

was

an

integral

part

of

my

life.

When

it

was

din-

nertime

in

my

house,

we

had

the

choice

of

pizza,

stromboli,

pizza,

or

pizza,

and

that

was

about

it.

A

stromboli

is

essentially

a

tube

of

pizza,

or

an

elongated

calzone,

and

serves

about

four

to

six

people

or

one

fat

twelve-year-old.

A

strom-

boli

is

usually

filled

with

ham,

salami,

pepperoni,

peppers,

onions,

and

cheese.

In

college

I

had

the

(un)fortunate

situation

of

living

right

next

door

to

a

pizza

place.

Lunch

usually

consisted

of

a

Rico

Boli

(a

mini

stromboli,

with

basically

one

of

every

animal

in

it),

garlic

cheese

bread,

and

an

order

of

dough

fritz

(fried

dough

topped

with

powdered

sugar).

In

fact,

my

nickname

became

Dough

Fritz

sometimes

shortened

to

Dough,

or

Fritz.

What

a

life

I

had

carved

out

for

myself!

How

I

made

it

out

of

there

alive,

I’ll

never

know.

So

you

may

know

the

glory

that

is

stromboli,

I

have

created

a

vegan

version.

L

I

B

A

T

I

O

N

R

E

C

O

M

M

E

N

D

A

T

I

O

N

To

accompany

this

delicacy,

just

grab

what-

ever

floaters

of

shitty

light

beer

are

left

on

your

coffee

table

from

the

night

before

and

make

sure

there

are

no

cigarette

butts

floating

in

the

cup.

If

you

didn’t

happen

to

throw

a

rager

in

your

living

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Medium 9780762780983

In the Kitchen

Williams, Lee Globe Pequot PDF

In the Kitchen

T

here are a lot of recipes that call for wine to be used as an ingredient, but more and more restaurants are using beer in their food. It just makes sense—beer adds a wider range of flavors than wine can. Depending on the style of beer you add to your recipe, you can get sweet, fruity, or bitter flavors; notes of chocolate or coffee; and anything and everything in between. Beer offers up more diversity than wine ever could.

This chapter offers up a handful of food recipes that feature beer as an ingredient as well as some refreshing beer cocktails that you can make at home.

Food Recipes

Agave Wheat Cheese Soup

A spicy take on the classic beer cheese soup, this recipe will certainly warm you up!

Just make sure to save some Agave Wheat to cool you down.

⁄4 cup butter or margarine

⁄4 cup all-purpose flour

21⁄2 cups milk

1 cup Breckenridge Agave Wheat beer

2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce

1½ teaspoons dry mustard

1

⁄2 teaspoon salt

1

⁄4 teaspoon (cayenne) pepper

2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese

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Medium 9781574414929

This and That

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

This and That

There are always snippets of information left over at the end of every project of this size. Corbitt combined these and placed them at the backs of all but her last cookbook. It proved popular with earlier readers, so I am availing myself of the same opportunity. In an effort to make your hours in the kitchen more effective, here are hints my mother and friends, fine cooks all, have passed along to me. I’ve added a few of my own picked up during a gastronomically satisfying half-century spent in my own kitchens.—Editor

If you don’t own a rolling pin, use a chilled cylindrical bottle of wine to roll pastry.

Something always needs to be grated: chilled citrus fruit is easier to grate. The extra flavor of freshly grated nutmeg and Parmesan cheese make it worth your effort. Either can be grated easily in a hand-held Zyliss or on a Japanese fresh ginger grater. Hard cheeses are easier to grate when they’re at room temperature.

Cream cheese is always worked at room temperature.

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Medium 9781574415889

Chicken and Game

Kim Stanford and Bill Backhaus University of North Texas Press ePub

CHICKEN AND GAME

We make some unbelievable chicken recipes, plain and simple. Chicken is so versatile, whether roasted, grilled, broiled, or fried. It makes a great salad, or makes a good salad even better. Our chicken dishes will captivate your guests or simply make you the family hero—dishes like Bourbon-Soaked Chicken with Applewood-Smoked Bacon and Vermont Cheese. We have “Real” Oven-Fried Chicken, and yes, it really works without frying. Your kids will love it. Then, of course, there’s our Herb-Crusted Parmesan Chicken. That’s right, gluten-free Parmesan chicken. We think it’s about time.

We also recommend this very important step: Use only organic, free-range chickens that are plump, with a creamy appearance, no visible blemishes and definitely no odor. Bonus: You’ll be amazed at the wholesome flavor and supple texture of fresh organic pasture-raised chicken. Before cooking, place the chicken in a nonreactive bowl and cover with apple cider vinegar for 20 minutes to remove any impurities. We use the vinegar as a cleaner, not as a flavor. Rinse, pat dry, and refrigerate until ready to use.

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Medium 9780253357076

2 The Social Dynamics of the Home Meal

Nir Avieli Indiana University Press ePub

2    The Social Dynamics of the Home Meal

In this second chapter on the Hoianese home meal, I expand my analysis in two directions: the first deals with the dynamics of the home-eaten meal, stressing its flexibility, variety, and ability to encompass change; the second sets the ground for the discussion of the interrelations between foodways and other social and cultural practices. I first classify the culinary process into stages, examining how each stage reflects, maintains and, at times, defines intra-family roles, statuses, and hierarchies. Specifically, I examine the conventional view of women as having a lower status, which appears to be in keeping with their identification with the low-status kitchen and cooking. An analysis of the changing roles of Hoianese women with regard to the culinary sphere at home reveals a much more nuanced and dynamic picture, however. The chapter concludes with an analysis of the tensions between the individual and the collective, as they materialize around the Hoianese table, emphasizing elements of social competition and conflict, which are essential though implicit aspects of the Hoianese meal.

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Medium 9781608682348

Menu 16. STATE FAIR FARE

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

M

E

N

U

16

M

an,

do

I

hate

the

fair.

Always

have.

Even

before

I

was

clued

in

on

animal

suffer-

ing

and

vegan

stuff,

I

still

avoided

the

fair

like

the

plague.

My

friends

would

always

be

like,

“Hey,

let’s

go

to

the

fair!”

And

I’d

be

like,

“Let

me

get

this

straight:

You

want

me

to

walk

around

all

day

in

some

filthy,

stinky

farmland

and

throw

some

balls

and

rings

at

stuff,

so

I

can

win

shitty,

useless

prizes

that

I

have

to

carry

around

all

day

and

will

end

up

throwing

away

when

I

get

home?

And

then

I’m

going

to

eat

so

much

sausage,

hot

dogs,

and

funnel

cake

which,

at

first,

I’ll

enjoy

until

I

have

to

take

three

separate

dumps

in

Porta-Johns,

before

we

spend

an

hour

finding

our

car

and

another

hour

getting

out

of

the

park-

ing

lot?

That’s

how

you’ll

have

me

spending

my

Saturday?

I

don’t

even

care

if

Warrant

is

opening

for

Stryper!

No,

thank

you!”

Just

because

I

hate

the

fair,

though,

doesn’t

mean

I

hate

the

food.

I

love

the

food.

And

corn

dogs

are

at

the

top

of

the

list.

P.S.

Wow!

I

just

went

and

watched

a

Stryper

video,

and

I

recommend

you

do

the

same.

You

will

not

be

disappointed.

L

I

B

A

T

I

O

N

R

E

C

O

M

M

E

N

D

A

T

I

O

N

Since

we’re

dealing

with

some

extremely,

ahem,

casual

food

here,

I’d

pair

it

with

a

Starburst

(see

recipe,

page 201)

.

.

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Medium 9781743216781

Camagüey Province

Lonely Planet Lonely Planet ePub

%32 / Pop 780,600

Neither Occidente nor Oriente, Camagüey is Cuba's provincial contrarian, a region that likes to go its own way in political and cultural matters – and usually does – much to the chagrin of folks in Havana and Santiago.

Seeds were sown in the colonial era, when Camagüey's preference for cattle ranching over sugarcane meant less reliance on slave labor and more enthusiasm to get rid of a system that bred misery.

Today Cuba's largest province is a mostly pancake-flat pastoral mix of grazing cattle, lazy old sugar-mill towns and, in the south, a few low-but-lovely hill ranges. It's flanked by Cuba's two largest archipelagos: the Sabana-Camagüey in the north and the Jardines de la Reina in the south, both underdeveloped and almost virgin in places.

Staunchly Catholic capital Camagüey, with its alluring architecture and cosmopolitan charm surpassed only by Havana, is the province's pin-up – a fiercely independent city that nurtured revolutionary poet Nicolás Guillén, groundbreaking scientist Carlos J Finlay and an internationally famous ballet company.

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