258 Slices
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Medium 9781574411362

Dallas

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

DALLAS

For me Dallas has always been a very special place, which I associate with very special occasions and people who were important in my life. As long as I live I will never forget my first visit to Dallas. My brother Hamilton agreed to take my sister Martha, our two cousins, Catherine, and Lucy, and me to Dallas to visit our Aunt Pearl and Uncle Jim and our beloved bachelor uncle Amos. We spent days getting ready. Mama carefully packed our Dallas clothes between sheets of tissue paper, made sure we had the right color hair ribbons and socks, and gave multiple instructions on how to be “good company.” We left Austin in Hamilton’s T Model Ford before sunrise. Seems like whenever we took a trip in those days we would always leave before daylight, which added to the mystery and excitement and I am sure caused us to wake up much earlier than was necessary. Mama had also packed us a big lunch, and Ham said we would stop at the park in Waco to picnic, but as it turned out we were a long way from Waco at lunchtime and a long way from Dallas by dark. We had seventeen blowouts and flat tires! Yes, sir, seventeen! Now while we perish the thought today, at that time this seemed only to add to the merriment and did not dampen our spirits one bit!

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Medium 9781574414868

Working with Chiles

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

WORKING WITH CHILES

POBLANOS • ROASTING AND CLEANING:

Roast the poblano chile directly over a gas flame until blackened on all sides (if you do not have a gas stove, lay the chile on a tray under a hot broiler). Transfer to a plastic bag and let sweat for 10–15 minutes. Peel off all the charred skin, dipping your fingers in water if needed. In Mexico, it’s common to see chiles peeled under running water; this does make it easier. However, you will lose some of the flavor. Be careful not to tear the chile when peeling.

FOR CHILES RELLENOS:

Make a long slit down one side of the chile and remove all the seeds and veins with your fingers. (This is where the heat of the chile is concentrated, so be sure to clean it thoroughly.) Leave the stem attached.

*You can always stuff your chiles, or at least roast and clean them, a day in advance.

FOR POBLANO STRIPS (RAJAS):

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Medium 9781574410761

This and That

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

This and That

There are always snippets of information left over at the end of every project of this size. Corbitt combined these and placed them at the backs of all but her last cookbook. It proved popular with earlier readers, so I am availing myself of the same opportunity. In an effort to make your hours in the kitchen more effective, here are hints my mother and friends, fine cooks all, have passed along to me. I’ve added a few of my own picked up during a gastronomically satisfying half-century spent in my own kitchens.—Editor

If you don’t own a rolling pin, use a chilled cylindrical bottle of wine to roll pastry.

Something always needs to be grated: chilled citrus fruit is easier to grate. The extra flavor of freshly grated nutmeg and Parmesan cheese make it worth your effort. Either can be grated easily in a hand-held Zyliss or on a Japanese fresh ginger grater. Hard cheeses are easier to grate when they’re at room temperature.

Cream cheese is always worked at room temperature.

You can judge the amount of butterfat in cheese by its firmness; hard cheese has less. Never heat no-fat cheese; the gum arabic used in it does just what its name implies.

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Medium 9781574411362

Fort Worth

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

FORT WORTH

Fort Worth is considered the most typically Texan of all Texas cities. It is a city blended with cattle, oil, business and industry and the greatest of assets—a progressive and friendly citizenship. To the flutter of a flag and the notes of a bugle, Fort Worth was founded by Major Ripley A. Arnold on June 6, 1849. Before that eventful day, this region had had a history, much of it unrecorded. It was a lush and lovely land, with clear streams and blue skies. Game abounded and this was a favorite hunting ground of the Indians, therefore becoming the site of many bloody wars. General William J. Worth, commander of the United States military forces with headquarters in San Antonio, had instructed Arnold to establish a military post for the protection of settlers against the Indians. So Arnold named the post Camp Worth (later to be called Fort Worth) in honor of this gallant commander. Born in New York State in 1794, Worth entered the Army as a private and rose to the rank of major general. He fought in the War of 1812 and played a leading part in the Florida-Indian War, bringing about peace with the Seminoles. In the War with Mexico, Worth displayed great gallantry in the taking of Monterey and aided in the storming of Chapultepec and the capture of Mexico City. He was buried in New York City, and a monument stands at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Broadway. The greatest monument to the brave soldier, however, is the great city which bears his name. Great herds of long-horns were driven from Texas to the railheads in Kansas. Fort Worth was on the main route, sometimes called the Chisholm Trail. The lowing herds camped near the town, and cowboys galloped in firing their pistols into the air and even rode their horses into the saloons—Fort Worth is still referred to as Cowtown. “Wild and woolly” characterized much of Fort Worth’s life in the 1880’s. Most celebrated of six-gun exponents was long-haired James Courtright, who could shoot equally well with either hand and was a master of the “border shift,” wherein a pistol was drawn, fired, tossed in the air, caught in the other hand and fired again.

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Medium 9781743216781

Valle de Viñales & Pinar del Río Province

Lonely Planet Lonely Planet ePub

%48 / Pop 595,000

The fragrant aroma of a fine cigar is an unmistakable scent and within Cuba, its smoky drift can be traced back to Pinar del Río province, the world's premier place to grow tobacco. The region is a rolling rustic canvas of fertile, rust-red oxen-furrowed fields, thatched tobacco-drying houses and sombrero-clad guajiros (country folk).

Jewels in the crown of this emerald land are the Valle de Viñales, a Unesco World Heritage Site studded with the alluring and distinctive mogotes (limestone monoliths) that nigh-on beseech you to get hiking, and Península de Guanahacabibes, a remote Unesco Biosphere Reserve abutting María la Gorda's swath of 50-plus dive sites.

Your obvious base is serene Viñales, a hassle-free village ringed by craggy hills and Van Gogh–like rural beauty, which beckons you to forge into some of the Caribbean's best caves, explore tobacco plantations and secluded swimming holes, lounge on idyllic sandy beaches and lose yourself in a laid-back land where every horizon harbors a host of quintessential 'come to the Cuban countryside' images. So come.

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Medium 9781574412185

Basic Ingredients

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press PDF

BASIC INGREDIENTS

CHEESES

MANCHEGO

Use only Mexican Manchego cheese, not Spanish, since the texture is quite different. It can be found in most large supermarkets. If you cannot find Manchego, substitute Monterey Jack.

RANCHERO

Ranchero cheese or Mexican fresh cheese is dry and crumbly. If you cannot find it in a Latin supermarket, substitute dry feta or Parmesan.

CREAM

The recipes in this cookbook use Mexican crema, which can be found in Latin supermarkets.

A close substitute would be crème fraîche, diluted with a little milk, or sour cream.

MEXICAN

LIMES

Mexican limes are Key limes and can be found in most supermarkets throughout the southern United States. If you cannot find them, you’re better off using green limes than lemons.

CHICKEN

STOCK

Here’s the first step in making a good soup.

1. Place a whole cut-up chicken in a large stock pot.

2. Add 1 quartered onion, 1 whole head of garlic, peeled, and 2 stalks of celery.

Cover with water and bring to a boil. Salt to taste.

3. Lower to medium heat and simmer for about an hour or until the chicken is done.

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Medium 9781574410761

BEEF

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

Beef

155

BEEF

Previously Unpublished

[After you’ve cut beef tournedos or filet mignons from the larger part of a beef tender, what can you do with the smaller end?] At the Zodiac

Room this dish was prepared and served in individual small sauté pans.

HELEN CORBITT’S BEEF GRENADINS

For 4

Cut 1 pound of 1-inch cubes from the small end of a beef tenderloin and flatten each with the heel of your hand.

½ cup flour

1 tablespoon paprika

1 tablespoon butter

¾ teaspoon salt

¼ cup brandy

1 cup heavy cream

Lightly dredge the meat in a mixture of flour and paprika. Melt butter in a sauté pan and quickly sear the meat. Remove the grenadins to a warm platter and sprinkle with salt. Add brandy to the skillet, allowing it to warm, and then light it to burn off the raw alcohol taste.

Scrape the browned bits from the bottom and sides of the pan as you add the cream. Continue cooking over medium heat until it reduces to a rich smooth sauce, but do not boil. Return the grenadins to the sauce to reheat for a moment and serve with boiled noodles or rice.

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Medium 9780762780983

Northwest

Williams, Lee Globe Pequot PDF

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Medium 9781574415889

Pantry List

Kim Stanford and Bill Backhaus University of North Texas Press ePub

PANTRY LIST

Here’s your guide to what we use and what we have found that works after years of research and trial and error. The products and ingredients that contain gluten are mind-boggling. Do you have any idea how many ingredients have gluten in them? Who would have thought that some brands of corn chips contain gluten? Your favorite barbecue sauce? Spaghetti sauce? Ranch dressing? Salad dressing? Seasoning? Marinade? Soy sauce? Potato chips? Ice cream? Mustard? And on the ingredient label, gluten might be disguised in these as well: brown rice syrup, fillers, artificial flavors and natural flavors, seasonings and spice blends, stabilizers, starch, and some yeasts. There are times you just want to throw your hands in the air and say, “Just give me a banana.”

The new Food and Drug Administration rule about “gluten free” on labels is going to help a lot. With it, any food labeled “gluten free,” “without gluten,” “free of gluten” or “no gluten” will be limited to less than 20 ppm (parts per million) of gluten. The rule goes into effect in August 2014, and it’s in line with international standards.

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Medium 9782067181977

VENETO

Michelin Travel & Lifestyle Michelin Travel & Lifestyle ePub

VENETO

Viticulture in Veneto is closely linked to the region’s history: the wine “de Venegia” was known since the Middle Ages not only in the Italian peninsula, but also beyond its borders, thanks to the far-reaching trade practised by the Serenissima Republic of Venice. It is not surprising, therefore, that wine is an integral part of the culture and daily life of the Veneto. As the goal of local vintners is to make wines of the highest quality, it is not surprising that Venetan production is remarkable not only for its volume (the region is one of the largest producers in Italy) but also for its excellence. The number of designated areas that Veneto boasts also puts the region in the high end of the table, attesting the importance viticulture has in the life of the population and in the regional economy.

Vineyards in the Verona countryside

Fauxware/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

Archaeological finds in the Lessini mountains confirm the close bond the Veneto has with the vine. It is perhaps due to this millenary tradition that the region has such a diverse and rich range of varieties of both white and black grapes.

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Medium 9781609520809

9. Do Not Feed the Bears

Paula Young Lee Travelers' Tales ePub

Chapter Nine

Do Not Feed the Bears

Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday.

Archy the Cockroach, from Don Marquis, Archy and Mehitabel, 1927

Weeks later, as fall draws near, the morning sun means that John and I will be bushwhacking up the mountain in back of the Big House. The reason is to look for moose and deer sign, because this is what hunters do. Its also just to get to the top of the mountain, because its there, and its a beautiful day. Dressed in hiking gear and ready to go, I start filling water bottles to stuff into our daypacks as John sits at the chair by the door and starts lacing on hiking boots.

Just so you know, Don says laconically to John from his lounger in the living room, the McKennas were back there, setting up bear bait.

(... bear bait?)

They quit hunting bears, Don continues. Now they run a little guide business for tourists who want to see bears. But dont be surprised if you smell something.

(... smell something?)

Err, I say, raising my hand to object.

Not likely youll find yourself in the same spot, Don drawls, pointedly ignoring the surprised look on my face, but no need to worry. Bears get timid as soon as the bait comes out because they know the seasons starting. Theyll just run away from you.

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Medium 9780762780983

Beer Festivals

Williams, Lee Globe Pequot PDF

Beer Festivals

T

here simply isn’t a better way to try a bunch of new beers at one time than going to a beer festival. Want to try a hard-to-find beer before buying it? Interested in sampling some quality craft brew that’s not sold locally in your hometown? If you consider yourself a beer lover and you haven’t been to a beer fest before, find the nearest event and go. Immediately.

January

Big Beers, Belgians and Barleywines Festival

Vail Cascade Resort & Spa, 1300 Westhaven Dr., Vail, Colorado 81657; bigbeersfestival​

.com; @BigBeersFest

B

ig Beers, Belgians and Barleywines Festival takes place each January in the snow-covered ski-resort town of Vail at the Cascade Resort & Spa. The emphasis, as you might have surmised from the name of the festival, is squarely on strong

Belgian-inspired beer styles, warming barleywines, and American strong ales. The festival is one of the most well received and attended in the state. Head brewers from many of the best breweries in the nation attend, hosting seminars and epic beer dinners and sharing their creations. If your tastes lean more toward big sweet barleywines, strong dark Belgians, and generally beers that pack a punch in terms of aroma, flavor, and boozy heat, then attending this festival is a no brainer. Many breweries brew beers especially for this festival, so it is also great for those who go out of their way to taste the rarest and newest American craft-beer creations. Since it is a strong ale festival, pacing your intake is essential, even if you consider yourself a “seasoned” drinker. If there is a downside to the festival, it’s cost. Vail isn’t cheap off-season, and a high-end beer festival hosted at the spa during peak ski season is expensive. It’s definitely worth attending once; just be prepared to save your pennies beforehand.

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Medium 9781574411935

4. Vegetables, Casseroles, and Soufflés

Jean Andrews University of North Texas Press PDF

Vegetable Dishes

GUJARATI

CREAMED CORN

This unusual corn and coconut dish comes from exotic Gujarat, a state in India adjacent to Pakistan on the Indian Ocean— famous for its textiles and one of my favorite areas in India.

GREEN-CORN TAMALES

These mouth-watering tamales are made with fresh white field corn, not sweet corn, and wrapped in the fresh, green, undried shucks.You have to eat them to believe how good they are.

Makes About 28 three-inch tamales

Makes 4 Servings

3 cups fresh or frozen corn kernels (1 lb)

2 cups milk

Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

2 tablespoon canola or vegetable oil

½ teaspoon cumin seeds

2 serrano or jalapeño peppers, seeded and minced

½ inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and grated

½ teaspoon ground turmeric

1 teaspoon Aleppo pepper

1 tablespoon butter

4 tablespoons fresh or dried coconut, grated

6 cilantro sprigs, chopped

5

½

¾

¾

6

¾

Put corn and milk in a saucepan; cook over medium heat until milk is reduced to three-quarter original amount, stir frequently—30 to 40 min. Add salt to taste. Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium heat; toast cumin seeds. Add serranos, ginger, turmeric, Aleppo pepper, and corn mixture; mix well. Add butter, coconut and cilantro; mix well; cook just until well heated.Adjust seasoning.

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Medium 9781574414868

Sources

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

S OURCES

The recipes in this cookbook are from my own kitchen, but the following sources have been most helpful in writing this book, especially the Introduction and “Secrets of Healthy Eating.”

Center for Science in the Public Interest. URL: www.cspinet.org

Kennedy, Diana. From My Mexican Kitchen: Techniques and Ingredients. New York: Clarkson Potter Publishers, 2003.

Kiple, Kenneth F., and Kriemhild Coneé Ornelas. The Cambridge World History of Food. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Newman, Cathy. “Why Are We So Fat?” National Geographic, August 2004, 46–54.

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Medium 9781743216781

Cienfuegos Province

Lonely Planet Lonely Planet ePub

%43 / Pop 408,825

Bienvenue (welcome) to Cienfuegos, Cuba's Gallic heart, which sits in the shadow of the crinkled Sierra del Escambray like a displaced piece of Paris on Cuba's untamed southern coastline. French rather than Spanish colonizers were the pioneers in this region, arriving in 1819 and bringing with them the ideas of the European Enlightenment which they industriously incorporated into their fledgling neoclassical city: the result today is a dazzling treasure box of 19th-century architectural glitz.

Outside of the city, the coast is surprisingly underdeveloped, a mini-rainbow of emerald greens and iridescent blues, flecked with coves, caves and coral reefs. The province's apex is just inland at El Nicho, arguably the most magical spot in the Parque Natural Topes de Collantes.

Though ostensibly Francophile and white, Cienfuegos' once-muted African 'soul' gained a mouthpiece in the 1940s in Cuba's most versatile musician, Benny Moré. He wasn't the only Afro-Cuban improviser. Nearby, Palmira is famous for its Catholic-Yoruba Santería brotherhoods, which still preserve their powerful slave-era traditions.

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