5286 Slices
Medium 9781588437785

A Brief History

Holly Smith Hunter Publishing ePub

For eons, this lower section of the continent was complete wilderness, traversed only by the quiet groups of Aborigines who settled here after migrating from the north. The first were the Tartanga, who came into the area some 27,000 years ago, and were later replaced by the Ngaiawang around 5,000 bc. The Nganguruku also settled here, in the picturesque Marne Valley, while northwest of the lush Barossa Ranges was the domain of the Ngadjuri and Peramangk cultures. Even Kangaroo Island, off the states southwest coast, was an Aboriginal dwelling, and relics of the regions dominant tribes have been found throughout the state. About 1,200 Nganguruku populated the region at the end of the 18th century.

The western world arrived with favorable winds in 1802, when Matthew Flinders explored and mapped Australias southern coast. Looking at his drawings, he noted the curving arc at its center now South Australias lower boundary and proclaimed it the great bight; today, this edging of cliffs is still as towering, wild, and chiseled as two centuries ago. Flinders went on to discover and name Kangaroo Island, the continents largest offshore landmass, the same year, and hes forever memorialized here in the west ends Flinders Chase National Park.

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Medium 9781742209982

Kremlin & Kitay Gorod

Lonely Planet Lonely Planet ePub

1Wandering around the grounds of the Kremlin; exploring 500 years of artistic mastery, political power and spiritual devotion; and gawking at the royal treasures in the Armoury.

2Marvelling at the multicoloured, multidomed spectacle of St Basil’s Cathedral.

3Paying your respects to Vladimir Ilych and other communist leaders at Lenin’s Mausoleum.

4Discovering the ancient churches hidden among the narrow streets of Kitay Gorod ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ).

5Watching ballerinas spin across the stage at the Kremlin Ballet.

If you have only one day in Moscow, you will probably spend it here. With more time, you might spend more than one day here, exploring the churches and museums, and viewing the trappings of power.

The neighbourhood’s key attractions are clustered around Red Square and within the walls of the Kremlin. It doesn’t matter which of these two you take in first, but try to leave time for both. Your visit to the Kremlin should be planned around admission to the Armoury: it requires advance purchase of tickets, which specify the admission times.

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Medium 9781588439239

Sanibel & CaptivaIslands

Chelle Koster Walton Hunter Publishing ePub

Alluring names with an exotic ring, the sister islands of Sanibel and Captiva sound like adventure. Legend has it they were named by a Spanish pirate called Gasparilla. Whether or not the old legend holds water, the water holds plenty of opportunity for outdoor recreation, from voracious shelling to tarpon fishing and 'gator-spotting. As much nature preserves as resort islands, Sanibel and Captiva provide prime wildlife experiences.

From Southwest Florida International Airport or Exit 131 off I-75, head west on Daniels Parkway for about 10 miles. Turn left on Summerlin Rd. (Rte. 869) and continue for about 10 miles to cross the Sanibel Causeway ($6 toll for most vehicles).

Turn right at the four-way stop sign at Periwinkle Way to get to Captiva Island. Turn right four miles later onto Tarpon Bay Rd., then left onto Sanibel-Captiva Rd. Drive about eight miles and cross the Blind Pass bridge.

Sanibel Island has two main roads that more or less parallel each other. Periwinkle Way is the main business route. Gulf Drive roves along the resorts, beaches, and homes at water's edge. It is segmented into East, West, and Middle Gulf Drive. Sanibel-Captiva Rd., known as San-Cap, connects the two islands at the Blind Pass bridge. On Captiva, the road becomes Captiva Dr., a narrow, twisty, scenic drive.

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Medium 9781588436290

Quemaro

Lynne Sullivan Hunter Publishing ePub

Quemaro is home to little more than Las Alamandas, a luxury hotel that has been featured in prestigious magazines like Town & Country and Travel + Leisure. The resort is a little way outside of the village.

Las Alamandas, San Patricio Melaque #201, tel.322-285-5500 or 888-882-9616 from the US, www.alamandas.com, is an exclusive retreat on the beach. The 11 villas, which cost between $390 and $790 each night, are surrounded by 1,500 hectares of jungle. Each is designed in a unique Mexican style and decorated with artistic ceramic tiles.

 

 

 

The villas have wooden shutters, private balconies, private kitchen areas and oversized tubs in the bathroom. The furniture is high-quality rattan with fuchsia covers and the walls are decorated with tasteful artwork. Benches are hidden in the gardens and flowered walkways lead between the villas. The service is outstanding. If you want a romantic drink while enjoying the sunset, the staff will take you to a point overlooking the ocean, open a bottle of champagne and ask when to pick you up. Then they will disappear until your pick-up time. For leisure activities there is a health spa, horses for riding and tennis courts. You can also go cycling or take a river excursion and look for wildlife. Meals, not included in the price of the room, can run about $200 a day extra. However, you get to order from a gourmet selection that is exceptional.

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Medium 9781742202143

Fitzroy & Collingwood

Planet, Lonely Lonely Planet Publications ePub

Despite a long bout of gentrification, the grungy inner-north suburbs of Fitzroy and Collingwood still maintain their reputation as the place where the cool kids hang out. Today it’s more about meeting to ‘do’ lunch and blog about it before checking out the offerings at local ‘one-off’ boutiques, cafes, bars and galleries along Smith and Gertrude Sts.

MStart in the gritty backstreets of Collingwood, with an Ethiopian single-sourced coffee and 'avocado smash' at Proud Mary. Then see where Melbourne's contemporary art scene is at in the Collingwood Arts Precinct.

RVenture down Smith St for lunch, and choose from favs such as Huxtaburger for brioche-bun burgers or Gelato Messina for life-changing gelato. Take in Smith St's 'coolsie' bearded and tattooed brigade, and head around the corner to Gertrude St for some of Melbourne's trendiest boutique stores including Third Drawer Down and Obüs. Push onwards to Fitzroy's famed Brunswick St, the heartbeat of inner-north's bohemian spirit. Give your feet a break with strong espresso at Marios, before exploring offbeat Polyester Books.

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