4 Chapters
Medium 9781574412246

5. Bring in the Pinkertons

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

five

Bring in the Pinkertons

Shortly after Pat Garrett began his work on the case, Governor

Thornton brought in additional help. Garrett was a man of action, a man who could round up the suspected parties. What Thornton sought next was a professional investigator. He called in the

Pinkertons.

The Pinkerton National Detective Agency had been founded in

1850 by Scottish immigrant Allan Pinkerton. For years, Pinkerton men served as ruthless strikebreakers and bodyguards, most notably for President Lincoln. Pinkerton private detectives also pursued some of the most wanted men in the West, among them the James and Younger gangs, the Hole-in-the-Wall gang, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, and the Wild Bunch.1

Thornton contacted the Pinkertons towards the end of February.

It had been worked out ahead of time with James Cree that their investigation would be paid for by the Southeastern New Mexico

Stock Growers’ Association. Cree also sent Thornton the letter he received from Colonel Fountain, dated October 3, 1895, showing

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Chapter 8 Who in the Hell Are You?

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

8

Who in the Hell

Are You?

A

fter his 1877 arrest, Long­ley claimed that “after leaving the

Indians, he went to Iowa and ‘knocked around’ for a month or two, and then revisited the state of Kansas.”1 There was no mention by Long­ley of the beautiful Dolores Gomez or any injuries received while trying to outdistance pursuing Mexican bandits, as Fuller later wrote. Very likely, Long­ley leisurely began his way back to Texas without intending much in the way of adventure.

Long­ley said that he ultimately arrived in Morris County in the east central part of Kansas, stopping at the village of Parkersville (now

Parkerville) “to take stock and form his plans for the future.”2 Parkersville, some ten miles northwest of the county seat, Council Grove, was on a branch line of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway that ran from Junction City, north of there, to Parsons in the far southeastern part of the state.3 The main street of the town paralleled the railroad line, and it was likely that Long­ley arrived there by train.

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7. Decision in the Sheriff’s Contest

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

seven

Decision in the Sheriff’s Contest

A decision in the sheriff’s contest came down on March 19. Judge

Bantz ruled in favor of Numa Reymond and instructed him to take office the next morning. Unfortunately, it did not appear to be a given that Garrett would be made chief deputy, and subsequently sheriff. Reymond told Garrett that he had made several promises to Oscar Lohman and others for positions on his staff and was not inclined to turn the office over to him. Reymond offered to make

Garrett a deputy sheriff and to assist him all he could in the Fountain case. Garrett did not want to listen to this and walked out.

This situation obviously frustrated Fraser as well, who was eager to see this settled so that Garrett could concentrate on the

Fountain case and accompany him on his trip of the sites. Fraser wrote, “I spent most of the day and evening trying to get this matter straightened out so that I would meet with no further delay, but when I discontinued matters were even worse than in the morning.” Llewellyn told Fraser that he and John Riley would go see

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Chapter 8. Who in the Hell Are You?

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press ePub

Chapter 8

Who in the Hell Are You?

After his 1877 arrest, Longley claimed that “after leaving the Indians, he went to Iowa and ‘knocked around’ for a month or two, and then revisited the state of Kansas.”1 There was no mention by Longley of the beautiful Dolores Gomez or any injuries received while trying to outdistance pursuing Mexican bandits, as Fuller later wrote. Very likely, Longley leisurely began his way back to Texas without intending much in the way of adventure.

Longley said that he ultimately arrived in Morris County in the east central part of Kansas, stopping at the village of Parkersville (now Parkerville) “to take stock and form his plans for the future.”2 Parkersville, some ten miles northwest of the county seat, Council Grove, was on a branch line of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway that ran from Junction City, north of there, to Parsons in the far southeastern part of the state.3 The main street of the town paralleled the railroad line, and it was likely that Longley arrived there by train.

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