222 Chapters
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Chapter 4 I Kept on Pumping Lead

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

4

I Kept on Pumping Lead

L

ong­ley said that he decided that the most practical way to get to Utah was by joining one of the many cattle drives headed north through the Indian Territory and terminating at the railhead at

Abilene, Kansas. According to him, he rode north to near Gainesville, in Cooke County not far from the Red River, and ran upon a large herd. The boss of the herd, a man named Rector, who Long­ley said came from Bee County in southwest Texas, hired Long­ley to go along on the drive, offering him pay of a dollar a day. Rector also furnished

Long­ley with an extra horse so that the horse Long­ley was riding could be turned out with the other extra horses on the drive in order to rest and gain a few pounds. Long­ley said that he picked out a horse and joined the trail drive as it headed into the Indian Territory.

Fuller quoted a letter from Long­ley that described his days with the trail drive as tedious, “following a big herd of cattle, seeing that none drop out by the wayside or are stolen and in the days of which

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Medium 9781574410297

9: Strange Noises

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

mJ~--------------------- Strange Noises

,va)' either. Center portions of the interior walls of the parapet, directly below the huge clocks, jutted out slightly, creating protrusions ideally suited for a dangerous game of hide-and-seek.. Except for a few ornate carvings and the faces of the huge clocks, the walls were made of smooth, pale limestone. When Don Walden and Cheryl

Botts left the deck, they surrendered it to Whitman's exclusive use; only a dying Edna Townsley occupied the interior of the twentyeighth t100r. Because Whitman had successfully secured the Tower's upper floor and deck, storming the fortress would require a serious and incredibly courageous effort. In order to delay further unwelcorned visitors, he wedged the Austin Rental Service dolly against the glass-panele<-l door on the south side.

N

The structure and design of the 28th tloor reception area and observation deck made for a dangerous gan1e of hide and seek. Whitman attempted to obstruct access to the area by placing Edna 'Townsley's desk and a chair at the top of the stairs. 'The large blank areas on the west and north sides were used for storage, and visitors had no access to the carillon and clock. As a result the only way to confront Whitman on the deck was through the south door. Texas Department of

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Chapter 18 Same Old Rattling Bill

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

18

Same Old Rattling Bill

L

ong­ley now languished in the well-guarded Galveston County jail until Judge Turner returned to Giddings in August to open the term of the district court. Although constrained by an iron bar connecting his ankles and affixed to chains,1 he kept himself occupied with a prolific frenzy of interviews, as well as writing letters when he could obtain writing materials and postage. Much of what he was reported as saying and wrote during this period gives insight into Long­ley’s mindset as he sought to both justify himself and rationalize his selfcreated reputation, at the same time beginning to reconcile himself to his pending fate. But throughout his writings can be detected a continuing glimmer of hope that he might yet avoid the hangman.

In one interview with a Chicago reporter, Long­ley boasted of yet another killing that he had not previously mentioned. This involved an alleged duel with a man named Grady in Mexico, supposedly in revenge for the killing of a friend of Long­ley in Texas. Long­ley also claimed that he was at this time invited, but declined, to participate with Mexican bandits on a raid into Texas.2 As with his other claims,

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Dolic’s Doom

Mark Coakley ECW Press ePub

Dolic’s Doom

“Huge amounts of costs by your government and ours, lawyers all over the place, all so a bunch of nuts in Toronto could have a little cocaine and destroy their lives.”

— Texas Judge Lynn Hughes

In 2005, Drago Dolic was in Canada, talking on the telephone with an American cocaine dealer named Thoi Uc Do. Dolic was doing a lot of business with people of Vietnamese descent. He told Do that he was looking to buy 100 kilos of cocaine every month in the U.S., which Dolic’s gang would smuggle to Toronto. Dolic called himself “the big wheel” in the illegal drug trade and said he had been doing this for years. He mentioned his involvement in a huge shipment of hash that police had seized in the 1980s and boasted that the members of his gang “do the time” if caught, never ratting on him. He bragged about his “$1.5 million house.”

The two dealers agreed to do business. Dolic would send money to Do as a down payment on 30 kilograms of cocaine. (At this time, Dolic usually paid about $12,000 a kilo.) It was agreed that the loads from Do to Dolic would later increase to 100 kilos a month. Dolic gave instructions on how the cocaine was to be put in a spare tire and given to a member of his gang in Buffalo.

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Chapter 1 A Good-Hearted Boy

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter 1

A Good-Hearted Boy

T

he menacing clouds and threat of rain did not deter the hundreds of people flocking to the small Texas town of Giddings to see Bill Long­ley die. The newly constructed wooden gallows waited silently some six hundred yards northwest of the railroad depot, where passengers alit by the score from incoming trains.

Although the execution was not scheduled until later in the afternoon of this dark, ominous October day, the main street of Giddings and the surrounding prairie teemed with the growing crowd from an early hour. They came by train, by carriage, by wagon and horseback, and on foot, black and white mingling single-mindedly as they awaited the carrying out of the court’s order and the end of the self-proclaimed mankiller’s odyssey. Stories circulated about a last-minute escape attempt and there were rumors that Long­ley had already survived one hanging.

Bill Long­ley had been confined now for not quite a year and a half, fighting this day as vigorously as he had willingly defied the conventions of his time. When captured, he had boasted of killing thirty-two men, even penning his memoirs in a Giddings newspaper and relishing the sensation he created throughout the state. He adopted for himself

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