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6: After Much Thought

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

I Z I - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - After Much Thought

several farm hands. Floyd Wells, a former employee, later served time in the Kansas State Penitentiary where he became friends with a fellow prisoner named Richard E. Hickock, who made repeated efforts to learn as much about the Clutter family as possible. Specifically; Hickock was interested in finding out if the Clutters had a safe in their home. Wells either suggested or Hickock conjured up a nonexistent safe located in a wall behind Herb Clutter's office desk,

Eventually; Hickock was paroled. Shortly afterwards he and a friend named Perry E. Smith headed for the Clutter home, where they expected to steal at least ten thousand dollars. They did not know that Herbert Clutter had a well-known reputation for not carrying cash; anyone in Holcomb could have told the pitiful fools that Herb

Clutter paid for everything by check,

Hickock and Smith sneaked into the home through an unlocked door (most people from Holcomb saw no need to lock doors) and terrorized the family before lulling Mr. Clutter, his wife Bonnie, and their two children Kenyon and Nancy. Each of the victims had been tied at the wrists. Mrs. Clutter and her children were murdered by shotgun blasts to the head from short range. Mr. Clutter's body was found in the basement of his home; he had been shot in the head and his throat had been slashed. 1

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The Funny Farm

Mark Coakley ECW Press ePub

The Funny Farm

“People were going wacko in there, that’s why we call it the funny farm … Too much time in closed doors, you know, they go woo-woo.”

— Jeff DaSilva

It was after his release from Millhaven in 2002 that Glenn Day got to know Dolic’s younger sister, Davorka Pelikan. In her late 30s, with three kids, “Dove” had once lived in Hamilton and now lived in Mississauga. Pelikan was not in good health. She used legal Percocet pills, which contained a mix of acetaminophen (a.k.a. Tylenol) and oxycodone, a powerful narcotic made from poppy flowers.

Oxycodone had been successfully (and falsely) marketed by Big Pharma as a safer painkiller than morphine or illegal drugs. Also called “hillbilly heroin,” for its disproportionate popularity in rural areas, oxycodone was very addictive, with side effects including nightmares, amnesia, nausea, itching and sweating. Overdoses were common in Canada, many of them fatal.

Nobody in the world has ever died of a cannabis overdose.

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6: AFTER MUCH THOUGHT

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

6
After Much Thought

I

During the summer of 1966 mass murder frequented the news. Truman Capote's In Cold Blood ushered in a “new journalism,” where real events were reported with fictional techniques. Capote engaged in a prolonged investigation to detail the mass murder of the Clutter family of Holcomb, Kansas, by two wanderers on 15 November 1959. Although first serialized in The New Yorker magazine in 1965, In Cold Blood was still the year's most talked about bestseller in 1966.

Mr. Herbert Clutter, an affluent wheat farmer, employed several farm hands. Floyd Wells, a former employee, later served time in the Kansas State Penitentiary where he became friends with a fellow prisoner named Richard E. Hickock, who made repeated efforts to learn as much about the Clutter family as possible. Specifically, Hickock was interested in finding out if the Clutters had a safe in their home. Wells either suggested or Hickock conjured up a nonexistent safe located in a wall behind Herb Clutter's office desk. Eventually, Hickock was paroled. Shortly afterwards he and a friend named Perry E. Smith headed for the Clutter home, where they expected to steal at least ten thousand dollars. They did not know that Herbert Clutter had a well-known reputation for not carrying cash; anyone in Holcomb could have told the pitiful fools that Herb Clutter paid for everything by check.

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Appendix I

David Johnson University of North Texas Press PDF

Appendix I

The Factions

Literally dozens of men and their families were involved in the Hoo

Doo War as active participants. The following list is a tentative effort to identify the primary participants on either side. The list makes no claim to be definitive, and in the case of the Hoo Doos, who closely disguised their identities, some of the names are based upon strong circumstantial evidence. The list is divided into three sections: BairdCooley faction, the Hoo Doos, the Citizenry who attempted to put the feud down or who, as outlaws, preyed upon both sides. In some cases, such as Caleb Hall, they are included with the faction that they were aligned with. Known outlaws of that time period are indicated with an asterisk (*).

Baird–Cooley Faction

William Scott Cooley

John R. Baird

John Peters Ringo

Moses B. Baird

Joseph Graves Olney

John C. Carson

George Gamel

Thomas W. Gamel

Marshal B. Thomas

A. G. Roberts

William Z. “Bill” Redding

Thomas S. Redding

Champion N. Faris

Robert Elihu Faris

John Tanner Olney

Samuel Young Olney

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EPILOGUE: THE WRITER FROM AUSTIN

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

EPILOGUE
The Writer From Austin

The evil that men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with their hones.—Marc Antony in William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Act III, Scene II.

Austin, Texas

Thirty years after the Tower incident, people on the Austin Police Force still think of Charles Whitman, and they still get angry. At APD headquarters, a typical government building, visitors walk into the lobby through front doors facing the access road of Interstate Highway 35, where Houston McCoy sped toward the Tower from Holly Street. A sign tells visitors to walk around to the back of a large circular desk for assistance. A trophy case on the left commemorates victories by Austin Police teams at shooting contests. Some of the trophies are old and tarnished, as are some of the frames which hold pictures of APD officers killed in the line of duty. Uniformed officers work the reception area near the elevators, which visitors cannot board without a numbered sticker identifying the floor to which the visitor has been given access. A large matted frame near the elevator holds a black and white picture of Billy Paul Speed. He looks his age—twenty-three. Few know that at the time of his death he was ready to quit police work and go back to school.

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