222 Chapters
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Medium 9781770904958

The Leopard

Mark Coakley ECW Press ePub

The Leopard

“This is the first time the [Ontario Provincial Police] has ever gone to Cuba.”

— OPP Detective Inspector Andy Karski

The RCMP’s liaison officer in Cuba let local police know that Bob DeRosa was wanted for drug and weapons offences in Canada and was now probably in Cuba. In November, the liaison officer contacted the officers running Project Birmingham, telling them that DeRosa had been found in Cuba and was now under surveillance.

Bob DeRosa talked to his mother on the phone about once a week. He told her he was in Cuba to get medical treatments for his back and that the warm weather was doing him good. He’d be returning to Canada for further medical treatments, he said. During one such phone call, DeRosa mentioned the Project Birmingham arrests, saying, “Ma, don’t worry about what you hear, because what they have put in the papers, I never did all of those things — that’s it.”

He often told her affectionately, “Mother, I’ll see you soon.”

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Medium 9781574413533

Chapter 9. Desperate-Looking Character

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press ePub

Chapter 9

Desperate-Looking Character

Although Fuller did not mention it in his account, Longley claimed that after he left Bell County, he went southwest to Mason County, where he moved about under the alias of “William Henry.” He said that he attended a horse race at old Fort Mason, which had been abandoned by the army in 1869, and met James J. Finney, the sheriff of Mason County.1 A former blacksmith,2 Finney was first appointed county sheriff in October 1869 under the military government of Reconstruction, then elected in his own right in November 1872.3

Longley said that Finney suspected his true identity because of descriptions that the lawman had received, but the two talked, drank, and gambled for four or five days. Longley claimed that he was suspicious of the sheriff. By mere chance, according to Longley, when Finney was ready to spring his trap, Longley happened to ride up to Fredericksburg in Gillespie County. He had not been there but a few hours when Finney and another man arrived in town, talked with Longley, and invited him to a saloon to take a drink. In the saloon, Longley said, he carefully avoided getting between the two men and kept the bar counter between them, frustrating their intent to surprise and overwhelm him. He said that he accepted their invitation to meet there again later that night to play cards, but that he instead mounted up and rode southwest some twenty miles to Kerrville in Kerr County.4

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Medium 9781574412246

11. Indictments

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

eleven

Indictments

Garrett and Perry began the next month working on Luis Herrera

(a different Herrera than was with the search party) after they received information that he might know where the bodies were, but this led to nothing.1

Not much progress was made in the investigation or the search for the bodies over the next two years. Fall, meanwhile, was able to have the cattle rustling indictments Fountain had brought against

Lee and McNew dropped.2

Pat Garrett had to run in the fall elections of 1896 in order to keep the office of sheriff. Garrett was a loyal, lifelong Democrat, but owed his position to the Republicans. Torn, Garrett decided to run as an

Independent and then registered as a Republican after an easy win.3

In the meantime, life went on in New Mexico. William Llewellyn served as a delegate in the Territorial Republican Convention and was elected to the Territorial House of Representatives, of which he became speaker.4 James Gililland married.5 So did Thomas

Branigan.6 Oliver Lee was a delegate for the Territorial Democratic

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Medium 9781574411676

5 The North Dallas Nightclub Scene

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter five

The North Dallas

Nightclub Scene

“He is violent even when he is not drinking. But when he does, it’s all over. I used to say, ‘It’s a good thing you can’t get a gun here [in Brussels].’ How did he get one in Texas?”

—Jenny, Belachheb’s first wife quoted in the Dallas Morning News

I

T

o one of the waitresses he encountered, Abdelkrim Belachheb was merely a five-foot six-inch man with a wig and crooked teeth.1 To some others, he apparently represented romance from the Mediterranean and mystery from Africa. The frequency of his sexual conquests is as much attributable to his tenacity as to his charm.

His compulsion for sexual conquests, especially of rich women, took him to the nightclubs that sprang up along the LBJ Freeway; the center of the Dallas construction boom. The wilder action was further north in Addison, where the clubs were louder and more raucous. But those establishments attracted a younger crowd— people emerging from high school and college, with good jobs and plenty of money to spend.

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Medium 9781574410297

7: THE NEAT LITTLE HOUSE AND THE SWANK APARTMENT

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

7
The Neat Little House and the Swank Apartment

I

On the front lawn of 906 Jewell Street, a single sapling struggled to reach the heights of the older trees in the neighboring yards. The front yard faced south, and from the street a narrow concrete sidewalk connected the curb to two steps leading to a small porch. From the edges, thick grass struggled to grow over the sidewalk. A screen door kept flying pests outside during suffocating summers when the front door was left open. Various shades of tan brick covered all exterior walls of the house. Inside were five small rooms; the front door led to a living room, which ted to a small dining room and finally to a kitchen facing the back yard. On the east side of the house were two small bedrooms and a bath. The back bedroom served as Charlie's study, and on its wall Charlie hung a sign; “Strength Has No Quarter.” Charlie and Kathy used the front bedroom.1

In April of 1966 Charlie and Kathy Whitman moved to 906 Jewell Street in south Austin. At the time, the tree in the front yard was a struggling sapling. Directly behind the tree is the front bedroom used by the Whitmans, where Charles murdered Kathy on 1 August 1966. The garage to the right and behind the house is where Charlie stored “a whole lot of military stuff.” Gary Lavergne.

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Medium 9781770904958

Masks and Mirrors

Mark Coakley ECW Press ePub

Masks and Mirrors

“I did not once sell anybody down the drain.”

— Fercan maintenance man Larry McGee

In the summer of 2009, Glenn Day was arrested.

In exchange for the police dropping charges — and for a sum of money — Day agreed to become an informant. An OPP detective sergeant handed Day a “Service Provider Agreement” for an investigation that had been randomly named “Project Birmingham,” whose goal was to arrest the masterminds behind the big Barrie grow op. The officer explained the document to Day, who reviewed it. The deal promised him $2,000 a week for at least 16 months, plus expenses, plus generous bonuses if certain results occurred. It also gave him immunity from prosecution — as long as he always told the truth.

Day signed, and would eventually be paid hundreds of thousands of dollars, courtesy of the taxpayers of Ontario, as the centerpiece of Project Birmingham.

A few days later, the on-the-record questioning began. The police officer showed Day a photograph of a man. Day identified him as Drago Dolic and said his nickname was “The Head.” Dolic, he said, was in charge of the grow ops at Molson, Oro and Ssonix and was the head of the gang — he did not think there were any moneymen or bosses above Dolic.

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Medium 9781574414974

13. The Boys

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

13

The Boys

“These guys would fight the devil on the steps of hell!”

—Gary M. Lavergne

I

The three men sometimes call themselves “The Boys.” Two of them are brothers and the third might as well be. Deputy United States Marshals Mike and Parnell McNamara are the sons of Thomas Parnell (“T. P.”) McNamara. T. P. ran the United States Marshal’s Office in Waco for thirty-seven years, a record that is now out of reach because of age requirements and mandatory retirement. So great was T. P.’s reputation as a lawman that he has been enshrined in the Texas Rangers Hall of Fame—quite a feat for a U.S. Marshal. From 1902 until his death in 1947, Mike and Parnell’s great-uncle, Guy McNamara, was a McLennan County Constable, Chief of the Waco Police Department, a Deputy U.S. Marshal, and finally a full United States Marshal.1 Law enforcement is as much a part of Mike and Parnell’s genetic makeup as their blue eyes are.

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Medium 9781574413052

Chapter 4 I Kept on Pumping Lead

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

4

I Kept on Pumping Lead

L

ong­ley said that he decided that the most practical way to get to Utah was by joining one of the many cattle drives headed north through the Indian Territory and terminating at the railhead at

Abilene, Kansas. According to him, he rode north to near Gainesville, in Cooke County not far from the Red River, and ran upon a large herd. The boss of the herd, a man named Rector, who Long­ley said came from Bee County in southwest Texas, hired Long­ley to go along on the drive, offering him pay of a dollar a day. Rector also furnished

Long­ley with an extra horse so that the horse Long­ley was riding could be turned out with the other extra horses on the drive in order to rest and gain a few pounds. Long­ley said that he picked out a horse and joined the trail drive as it headed into the Indian Territory.

Fuller quoted a letter from Long­ley that described his days with the trail drive as tedious, “following a big herd of cattle, seeing that none drop out by the wayside or are stolen and in the days of which

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Medium 9781574411676

7 “Take that . . . ”

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter seven

“Take that . . . ”

“The movies don’t even come close.”

—Norman* piano player for the Mike Harris Quartet

I

T

he Mike Harris Quartet had been playing soft music since

9 P.M., and by the time midnight came along, they were getting no requests or tips. “Hey, it was a Thursday night,” said Norman, the piano player. They played Duke Ellington’s C Jam Blues before taking a break just after midnight. Sherlyn, the featured singer, turned on taped music and went to the end of the bar where Mary and Dick were talking and laughing.

From the time Belachheb arrived to just after midnight, he had three or four Johnny Walker and 7Up. He roamed around the entire barroom and spoke to nearly all of the women. He even danced with a few, but he always came back to Marcell.

“Marcell was the kind of person if she was annoyed with somebody you could tell quite immediately,” Dick observed. He noticed, as did almost everyone else, that Marcell wanted less and less to do with Belachheb as the night wore on. Some of the other regulars, less than enchanted by her brusque ways, recall that she could, at times, be cruel. “I had seen her before come on to a man sitting next to her and then belittle him in front of people,” remembered a Ianni’s bartender.

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Medium 9781574410723

8 Every Woman’s Nightmare

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

8

Every Woman’s Nightmare

“He knew where there was a good-looking girl in a convenience store that he was going to take.”

—Alva Hank Worley

I

Unlike other Louisiana parishes, Evangeline Parish reflects the cultural and geographic diversity of the entire state. On the southern end, Cajun

Catholics and other Louisiana French descendants inhabit a fertile prairie. Farmers take advantage of the high water table to flood fields for the planting and harvesting of rice. The recent craze for Cajun food transformed the flooded rice fields into aquafarms, supplying crawfish to customers around the world. On the northern end of Evangeline Parish,

Anglo-Saxon Protestants dominate piney woods, red dirt, and rolling hills.

Louisiana’s geo-demographic, political, religious, and cultural dichotomy,

“north” and “south” Louisiana, meet in Evangeline Parish. This cultural fault line between north and south Louisiana is where Allen and Pat

Reed raised their family. They had two daughters, Lorraine (“Lori”) and

Colleen. Two older daughters named Anita and Mae, from Pat’s previous marriage, completed the family of six.1

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Medium 9781574414974

1. They Was Just Pranks

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

1

They Was Just Pranks

“I got sent to prison because I was an asshole. They should have been able to overlook that.”

—Kenneth Allen McDuff

I

On the eastern edge of Rosebud, Linden Street heads south from Main Street toward a baseball field carved out of surrounding farmland. Small wooden houses, old but well kept, and shaded by large pecan trees, line the streets. On the east side of Linden, only the second building from Main, stands what once was the Rosebud Laundromat. A small living area connects to the rear of the laundromat where the family of John Allen “J. A.” McDuff lived. At least some of the McDuff children, including two boys named Lonzo (“Lonnie”) and Kenneth, were born in far-off Paris, Texas, and no one seems to know why the McDuffs, who lived in the Blackland Prairie before moving to Rosebud, ended up in the area.

J. A. did farm work. His wife was a hefty, domineering woman named Addie. Addie ruled. She controlled everything, including the money, the children, and J. A. “The only opinions J. A. had were Addie’s,” a longtime Rosebud resident would say.1 At least one of Kenneth’s teachers, however, knew of some who thought that at one point J. A. had made some effort to bring discipline into the lives of his two sons. In reality no one knew for sure. The family was a mystery to those around them. In Texas Monthly, Gary Cartwright wrote that the McDuffs were not the friendliest people, in fact, they were downright weird—“but they weren’t white trash either.”

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Medium 9781574410297

2: THE SOLDIER AND THE TEACHER

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

2
The Soldier and the Teacher

I

After basic training, Charlie was stationed at what was then one of the most troubled spots in the world—Guantanamo Naval Base, Cuba—beginning on 9 December 1959. At least one of his marine buddies believed that, above and beyond being in the marines, being at Guantanamo Bay placed a strain on Charlie.1 Most likely, Charlie's desperation to free himself from his father's support and control made everything else secondary—even Cuba's drift toward Communism. Yet he had entered another life of regimentation; he would still have to take orders. He may have been drawn to another form of strict authority after becoming conditioned to taking orders. More likely, a hitch in the marines resulted from an attempt at a dramatic, irrefutable rite of passage into adulthood. No one, not even C. A. Whitman, could seriously argue that a United States Marine was anything less than a man. For Charlie Whitman, taking orders probably seemed like a small price to pay.

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Medium 9781574412246

2. Enter Albert B. Fall and Other Men of Note

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

two

Enter Albert B. Fall and Other Men of Note

In November 1888, Fountain ran against Democratic newcomer

Albert B. Fall for a seat in the New Mexico State Legislature.1

Fountain won the election and went on to be chosen speaker of the house. While in the legislature, Fountain pushed for public education for both boys and girls, an unpopular idea at the time. He successfully fought to have the state’s land grant college situated in Las Cruces. (It now is New Mexico State University.) He also worked vigorously for statehood.2 The rest of Fountain’s life would be intertwined with that of his opponent in the 1888 election. The two men, Fountain as a leader of the Republicans and Fall a soonto-be leader of the Democrats, grew to despise each other.

Albert Bacon Fall was born in Frankfort, Franklin County,

Kentucky, on November 26, 1861.3 He married Emma Morgan on

May 8, 1883, and they settled in New Mexico in 1887.4 According to his service record, Fall stood five feet, ten and one-half inches tall, had a fair complexion, brown eyes, and black hair.5 Despite his limited formal education, the former miner rose quickly in the

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Medium 9781574410723

2 The Broomstick Murders

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

2

The Broomstick Murders

“It was like taking a bird that was taught to love and respect people out of its cage and blowing its head off.”

—Jack Brand

I

The summer of 1966 was hideously hot even by Texas standards. It was also a period of great sadness. August began with the largest mass murder in American history—the University of Texas Tower shootings in Austin by Charles Whitman. After murdering his wife and mother during the night and spending the next morning preparing, Whitman began a ninetyminute killing spree in which he fired over 150 rounds at innocent and unsuspecting people, killing fourteen and wounding at least thirty-one.

The Texas Tower tragedy came at a time when Texans were just starting to live down the assassination of John Kennedy in 1963. The irony of both crimes was that neither Whitman nor Oswald were native Texans, yet both will forever be associated with Texas.1

Five days after the Tower tragedy, on August 6, 1966, Roy Dale Green and Kenneth Allen McDuff began their day by pouring concrete with J.

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Medium 9781574411676

12 “An altered state of consciousness”

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter twelve

“An altered state of consciousness”

“Brain damage is fairly common.”

—Dr. John Mullen an Assistant Professor of

Neurological Surgery and Neurology

I

A

fter the defense rested, Norman Kinne lined up witnesses who had dealings with Belachheb and were ready to testify that he was perfectly sane. Oh, he was odd, and in their minds maybe a little crazy, but he was certainly someone who had enough mental capacity to know the difference between right and wrong.

The first of the witnesses was Beth.1 She was a secretary for a law firm and the person who had introduced Abdelkrim

Belachheb to Joanie. She described Belachheb as a selfish schemer who readily admitted that he needed to marry a woman who had money—an American who could help him secure permanent residency in the United States. According to Beth, he seemed to have found what he wanted in Joanie, who spent large sums of her limited income on his expensive tastes. He had nice clothes, memberships in clubs, and drank to excess in plush bars and restaurants (not to mention his custom wig). Beth even testified that

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