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Chapter 5 We Set Out in Fine Spirit

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

5

We Set Out in

Fine Spirit

W

hatever happened in Kansas, Long­ley continued northward, first to Omaha, Nebraska, then on to Cheyenne in Wyoming

Territory, where he said that he joined a party of miners preparing for an “exploring expedition” into the Big Horn range of mountains.1 He was welcomed by the leaders forming the group, including a Captain

Kuykendall, and on their instructions obtained necessary supplies and readied to leave immediately.2

The record backs up Long­ley’s account at this point. Judge W. L.

Kuykendall, late in 1869, had pondered the feasibility of organizing a semi-military group of prospectors to venture into the country above the North Platte River to displace the Sioux Indians there and look for gold. Discussing the idea with others, Kuykendall placed an advertisement in the Cheyenne newspaper for a meeting at McDaniel’s Theater. Elected president of the Black Hills and Big Horn Association at the meeting by eager prospectors, Kuykendall began recruiting an expedition, and ultimately, according to him, two thousand men volunteered, each agreeing to bring with him a “repeating gun,” one thousand rounds of ammunition, and rations for six months.3 According to

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Medium 9781574410723

11 Cowboy

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

11

Cowboy

“Something is wrong with that man.”

—[Bruce] a.k.a . “One-Arm”

I

Before December of 1991, the people of Austin, Texas, did not consider going to a yogurt shop, or washing their car, a dangerous activity—and for good reason. The overall crime rate for Austin had fallen by two percent from 1990 to 1991, and although the murder rate rose by seven percent, the actual number of victims rose from only fortysix to forty-nine. Additionally, the Austin Police Department’s Homicide Detail was particularly good at solving its cases. Nationally, about sixty-six percent of homicide cases were solved; in cities with more than 250,000 people the “clearance rate” was slightly over half; in

Austin, the rate was an impressive eighty-six percent. The Yogurt Shop

Murders and the abduction of Colleen Reed, however, spread fear throughout the Austin metro area. “I guess the public’s attitude is developed by high visibility crimes, and certainly during the latter part of the year [1991] we had those high visibility crimes,” said Assistant Police Chief George Phifer.

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Medium 9781574413533

Chapter 11. Bill Was Still Fighting

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press ePub

Chapter 11

Bill Was Still Fighting

The Lee County sheriff mounting the search for the Longley brothers was James McKeown, the father of Bill’s early criminal companion, Johnson. Sheriff McKeown was elected as Lee County’s first sheriff on June 2, 1874.1 But the posse led by James McKeown never came close to the fleeing brothers, who headed north after leaving Burleson County.

Jim later recalled2 that they initially steered clear of settlements where they might be recognized. Camping out in the open each night, Jim hunted and killed swamp rabbits to eat with the bacon and bread they had brought with them. They approached the Brazos River, heading toward Bryan, and encountered a black man with three yokes of steers that he was taking to Caldwell. The two outlaws, apparently feeling their oats, made the man “dance,” riding on after rewarding him with a half-quart of whiskey. One can only suspect what happened to the other half-quart.

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Medium 9781574411805

Fourteen—“We will kill as many people as possible.”

William T. Harper University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter Fourteen

“We will kill as many people as possible.”

—Fred Carrasco, hostage-taker

Federico Gomez Carrasco’s moods were hard for those in the Command Post to predict. On several occasions,

TDC Director Estelle made, or authorized lawyer

Ruben Montemayor to make, offers to Carrasco that quickly backfired. For instance, late Friday after about thirty minutes of negotiations directly between Estelle and Carrasco, an offer of transportation was made.

Estelle assumed, one way or the other, the three hostiles would need a getaway vehicle. According to

Warden Husbands, “We told Carrasco there would be a car inside the Walls waiting for his instructions.

We told him that the car would be pulled up to the ramp in front of the building, filled with gas with the motor either running or off, whatever he wished.”1

Although authorities had had expected it since day one of the siege, Carrasco had not asked for transportation in exchange for the hostages.

Estelle did not tell the hostage-takers they were being allowed to go free. They were only offered transportation. Estelle remembered, “Had they taken it up, we’d have arranged their safe conduct—but only

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Chapter 19 Hanging is My Favorite Way of Dying

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

19

Hanging is My Favorite

Way of Dying

A

s Bill Long­ley faced his transfer to Giddings and coming one step closer to the gallows, his father was apparently not faring very well. Bell County Judge Erastus Walker submitted a petition to the state government on behalf of Campbell Long­ley requesting a petition for financial assistance stemming from his service in the Texas army in 1836. Walker described the sixty-two-year-old Campbell as

“too old to labour for a support, that he has several in family to provide for and has no one to assist him to make a support for himself and family—that his health is not good—that he is poor and needy, in fact in indigent circumstances and that he was in said condition on the

1st of July, 1876.”1 In May, 1874, Campbell had filed a pension claim, which was approved for $250.2

Whether or not Bill Long­ley was aware of this is unknown. His uncle Alexander Preston Long­ley, known as “Pres,” sent a letter in

August on behalf of his condemned nephew to President Rutherford

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Medium 9781574414974

2. The Broomstick Murders

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

2

The Broomstick Murders

“It was like taking a bird that was taught to love and respect people out of its cage and blowing its head off.”

—Jack Brand

I

The summer of 1966 was hideously hot even by Texas standards. It was also a period of great sadness. August began with the largest mass murder in American history—the University of Texas Tower shootings in Austin by Charles Whitman. After murdering his wife and mother during the night and spending the next morning preparing, Whitman began a ninety-minute killing spree in which he fired over 150 rounds at innocent and unsuspecting people, killing fourteen and wounding at least thirty-one. The Texas Tower tragedy came at a time when Texans were just starting to live down the assassination of John Kennedy in 1963. The irony of both crimes was that neither Whitman nor Oswald were native Texans, yet both will forever be associated with Texas.1

Five days after the Tower tragedy, on August 6, 1966, Roy Dale Green and Kenneth Allen McDuff began their day by pouring concrete with J. A. and Lonnie McDuff. They were anxious to go out and have fun when their Saturday workday ended sometime between noon and 1 P.M. Years later, Texas Ranger John Aycock discovered that Roy Dale had been Kenneth’s second choice to go out to Fort Worth. He had asked another friend named Nicholas to go with him. It probably did not matter to Kenneth, at least not for what he had planned. On that night Kenneth wanted to perform before an audience, and he settled for Roy Dale.2

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Chapter 20 Not Upon His Doomed Neck

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

20

Not Upon His

Doomed Neck

B

ill Long­ley quickly passed from the pages of Texas newspapers, and his notoriety with him. Other gunmen, such as Hardin and

Ben Thompson, stepped to the forefront of the public spotlight, their sort continuing to fascinate those who found glamour and excitement in the larger-than-life exploits of an outlaw, as opposed to the humdrum routine of school, farming, or other similar everyday callings. As with Long­ley, the notorious Jesse James also capitalized on the press to insure a place in history, although James took great pains to deny his nefarious deeds.

Only eight months after the hanging, however, stories were already being passed around in Dallas that the execution had been a hoax, thus commencing decades of confusion and speculation about the ultimate fate of Bill Long­ley. “Rich relatives supplied him with a steel corset and neck piece, which prevented the rope from choking him or pulling on his neck at all when the drop fell.” Friends were supposed to have pretended to bury the body, smuggling Long­ley away and “setting him up in business in California, where he now lives a pious and model young man.”1 Although the story was briefly published in 1879, it did

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Medium 9781574410297

14: The White Headband

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

Bm--------------

The White Headband

thought would surely get the attention of the sniper. Every "bang" caused McCo~ Crum and Day to grasp their rifles a little tighter and to look a little closer. "God damn! He's making a lot of noise,"

McCoy thought.' Each of them had seen what the sniper was capable of doing. Outside the Tower they had seen bodies shot from incredibly long distances; inside they had seen what Whitman had done at close range: Edna, Mark, Marguerite, Mary, and Mike.

Ramiro Martinez never hesitated. Armed only with a 38 revolver, he walked through the glass-paneled door and out onto the deck.

For the first time in over ninety minutes Charles Whitman had company-company he must have known would arrive eventually.

Although Martinez made a considerable amount of noise getting the glass-paneled door to open, Whitman may have heard nothing.

The return fire on the west side was fierce and Whitman had tuned his radio, with the volume as high as it could go, to Neal Spelce's broadcast on I(TBC. It is even possible that Whitman had lingered on the west side in order to hear some part of the radio broadcast, unknowingly allowing Martinez, Crum, and McCoy time to enter the deck undetected. The news reports Whitman would have heard by that time probably pleased him.

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Medium 9781574410723

7 Going to College

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

7

Going to College

“This guy is sitting by somebody’s wife and somebody’s daughter in class!”

—Parnell McNamara,

Deputy United States Marshal

I

At the beginning of 1991, McDuff reported to his Temple parole officer that he was working in a warehouse in the Dallas area as a forklift operator. Six days later he asked to transfer his parole supervision to the Dallas

District. But less than two weeks after that he reported to his Temple parole officer that he was back in Temple living with J. A. and Addie.

Kenneth’s aging parents apparently had little energy for raising a fortyfive-year-old teenager; McDuff moved into the Jean Motel in Temple during much of March. Only six weeks earlier McDuff had discovered a way that he could have access to a private room, eat three meals a day in a cafeteria, receive money for subsistence—even during holidays—and receive an education. All he had to do was go to class. Kenneth Allen

McDuff was going to college.1

Project RIO (Re-Integration of Offenders) was an outgrowth of the

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Medium 9781574412246

14. Jack Maxwell Testifies

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

fourteen

Jack Maxwell Testifies

The next day led off with the witness whom the prosecution had been waiting for. Jack Maxwell, who claimed he had been absent due to illness, was brought into town by Ben Williams. Maxwell was finally sworn in and took the stand.

Maxwell stated that he had known Lee and Gililland for five or six years and that his ranch was not very far from Lee’s. “On

February 1, 1896, I was at Dog Canyon ranch and spent the night there. I got there just before sundown. When I got there I found

Mrs. Lee [Oilver’s mother], Mr. Blevins, Mr. Bailey, and Ed, the colored man. I ate supper there that night and slept in the house with Mr. Blevins.”

“What time did you get up Sunday morning?” Childers asked.

“At sunup and I ate breakfast with Mr. Blevins and others.”

“Did you see either of these defendants there for breakfast?”

“No sir.”

“What did you do that day?”

“I stayed down at the corral.”

To an unknown question, Maxwell answered, “Saw four persons mounted on two horses coming from the northeast toward the house. They came within 200 yards from me and dismounted.”

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Medium 9781574412048

Appendix I

David Johnson University of North Texas Press PDF

Appendix I

The Factions

Literally dozens of men and their families were involved in the Hoo

Doo War as active participants. The following list is a tentative effort to identify the primary participants on either side. The list makes no claim to be definitive, and in the case of the Hoo Doos, who closely disguised their identities, some of the names are based upon strong circumstantial evidence. The list is divided into three sections: BairdCooley faction, the Hoo Doos, the Citizenry who attempted to put the feud down or who, as outlaws, preyed upon both sides. In some cases, such as Caleb Hall, they are included with the faction that they were aligned with. Known outlaws of that time period are indicated with an asterisk (*).

Baird–Cooley Faction

William Scott Cooley

John R. Baird

John Peters Ringo

Moses B. Baird

Joseph Graves Olney

John C. Carson

George Gamel

Thomas W. Gamel

Marshal B. Thomas

A. G. Roberts

William Z. “Bill” Redding

Thomas S. Redding

Champion N. Faris

Robert Elihu Faris

John Tanner Olney

Samuel Young Olney

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11. Indictments

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

eleven

Indictments

Garrett and Perry began the next month working on Luis Herrera

(a different Herrera than was with the search party) after they received information that he might know where the bodies were, but this led to nothing.1

Not much progress was made in the investigation or the search for the bodies over the next two years. Fall, meanwhile, was able to have the cattle rustling indictments Fountain had brought against

Lee and McNew dropped.2

Pat Garrett had to run in the fall elections of 1896 in order to keep the office of sheriff. Garrett was a loyal, lifelong Democrat, but owed his position to the Republicans. Torn, Garrett decided to run as an

Independent and then registered as a Republican after an easy win.3

In the meantime, life went on in New Mexico. William Llewellyn served as a delegate in the Territorial Republican Convention and was elected to the Territorial House of Representatives, of which he became speaker.4 James Gililland married.5 So did Thomas

Branigan.6 Oliver Lee was a delegate for the Territorial Democratic

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Thirteen—“We will assassinate everyone!”

William T. Harper University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter Thirteen

“We will assassinate everyone!”

—Fred Carrasco, hostage-taker

With their intelligence-gathering system in place, the

Command Post returned to the task of formulating a plan for entering the library with an attack team, if necessary. No thought, scheme, nor concept, was rejected out of hand, no matter how far out of the box it might seem to be. Some ideas had what TDC

Director Estelle called a “Buck Rogers” quality about them.1 Under even the best-case scenarios, they knew an assault would no doubt be a blood bath. The aim was to hit hard, hit fast, with as much firepower as they could muster, and with the element of surprise.

It would have to be a massive, shocking blow, stunning the gunmen and traumatizing them before they could get off any rounds aimed at their captives.

Everyone in the Command Post knew there was no way they could hit hard enough and fast enough to save all the hostages. It was just a matter of reducing the losses, of lowering the body count. How many hostage lives could they afford to lose in order to save how many others? How many body bags would they need?

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Chapter 11 Bill Was Still Fighting

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

11

Bill Was Still Fighting

T

he Lee County sheriff mounting the search for the Long­ley brothers was James McKeown, the father of Bill’s early criminal companion, Johnson. Sheriff McKeown was elected as Lee County’s first sheriff on June 2, 1874.1 But the posse led by James McKeown never came close to the fleeing brothers, who headed north after leaving Burleson County.

Jim later recalled2 that they initially steered clear of settlements where they might be recognized. Camping out in the open each night,

Jim hunted and killed swamp rabbits to eat with the bacon and bread they had brought with them. They approached the Brazos River, heading toward Bryan, and encountered a black man with three yokes of steers that he was taking to Caldwell. The two outlaws, apparently feeling their oats, made the man “dance,” riding on after rewarding him with a half-quart of whiskey. One can only suspect what happened to the other half-quart.

Riding into Bryan, Bill stopped at a saloon to get more whiskey.

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One—“Stop right there or I’ll kill you!”

William T. Harper University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter One

July 24, 1974 • Day One

“Stop right there or I’ll kill you!”

—Fred Carrasco, hostage-taker

Ronald (Ron) Wayne Robinson kept looking at his watch, anxious to get home for his daughter Sheryle’s eleventh birthday party that night. Aline V. House was kicking herself for forgetting to bring her bloodpressure medication to work. Bobby G. Heard kept looking through the doorway to see if his relief was on his way up to take his place as the only guard in the prison library. Ann Fleming was thinking about her eighty-year-old mother in a Nashville, Tennessee, nursing home. Novella M. Pollard was worried about getting her rent check in the mail on time. Elizabeth

Yvonne (Von) Beseda’s concern was the alteration of her daughter ’s University of Texas cheerleader uniform. All in all, it was just a routine day in

Huntsville, Texas.

That routine ended abruptly with the roar a .357 caliber Ruger Speed Six, blue Magnum revolver made as it was fired in the confined quarters of the thirdfloor library of the State Penitentiary in Huntsville,

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