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Medium 9781574412048

Conclusion: “A Bitter Cup of Suffering”

David Johnson University of North Texas Press PDF

conclusion

“A Bitter Cup of Suffering”

In his biography of Texas Ranger Ira Aten, historian Harold Preece wrote of the feud, “Corpses had dangled from pecan trees. Men were called to their doors at night and gunned to death before their families. Ranchers and cowboys were butchered on rocky roads, then dumped like the carcasses of wild goats into mountain gulches and creek bottoms.”1

Aten recalled that in 1884 the feud again threatened to erupt, this time in McCulloch County “right next door to Mason County—scarcely an omen of peace.”2 The Rangers hustled to the area, all too familiar with the passions that governed the Hill Country. Another upsurge in the feud was avoided, and in time the violent passions of the region began to cool. Age was overtaking the fighters, and death came for them all in time.

Among the Germans charged with organizing the mob, Ernst

Jordan was the first to die. Crippled for life from the gunshot wound to his leg, Jordan was unable to enjoy the active life that he once had.

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Medium 9781574411805

Twenty-three—“If he’d only send out Linda Woodman.”

William T. Harper University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter Twenty-three

August 2, 1974 • Day Ten

“If he’d only send out Linda

Woodman.”

—TDC Director, Jim Estelle, Jr.

During the preceding days of the siege, there were innumerable moments of panic for the hostages, but for Linda Woodman, the start of the tenth day was far more terrifying than anything she had been subjected to. And it had absolutely nothing to do with Fred

Carrasco, Rudy Dominguez nor Ignacio Cuevas. This panic attack was brought on by an act of God. On this

Friday morning the librarian was on guard duty at the broken door. It was about five o’clock, and she was speaking with inmate hostage Florencio Vera as

Ignacio Cuevas hovered nearby. Vera was, as usual, high on pain-killing drugs due to his recent surgery, and he asked Woodman to marry him when this was all over.

Stunned but not wanting to alienate another inmate, Woodman told him, “Oh, no. You’re too young.”

Vera was upset, saying her rejection was because he “was a Mexican.” He boasted about having thirty hours of college credit and asked, “If I went to college, would you like me better?”

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Medium 9781574411676

5 The North Dallas Nightclub Scene

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter five

The North Dallas

Nightclub Scene

“He is violent even when he is not drinking. But when he does, it’s all over. I used to say, ‘It’s a good thing you can’t get a gun here [in Brussels].’ How did he get one in Texas?”

—Jenny, Belachheb’s first wife quoted in the Dallas Morning News

I

T

o one of the waitresses he encountered, Abdelkrim Belachheb was merely a five-foot six-inch man with a wig and crooked teeth.1 To some others, he apparently represented romance from the Mediterranean and mystery from Africa. The frequency of his sexual conquests is as much attributable to his tenacity as to his charm.

His compulsion for sexual conquests, especially of rich women, took him to the nightclubs that sprang up along the LBJ Freeway; the center of the Dallas construction boom. The wilder action was further north in Addison, where the clubs were louder and more raucous. But those establishments attracted a younger crowd— people emerging from high school and college, with good jobs and plenty of money to spend.

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Medium 9781574413052

Chapter 3 Murdering, Robbing, and Ravishing

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

3

Murdering, Robbing, and Ravishing

B

y Long­ley’s scenario, he left Washington County in the spring of 1869 and headed for Arkansas. At some point, as he reached the Texas-Arkansas-Louisiana border area, he said that he fell in with a Tom Johnson, whose family lived in Lafayette County, Arkansas, just east of the Texas state line where Texarkana is located. Johnson was allegedly a “noted horse thief” and a member of the gang of terrorists led by the notorious Cullen Baker. When Long­ley asked where he might find accommodations that night for himself and his horse,

Johnson invited him to his father’s farm.1

Cullen Montgomery Baker was known as the “Swamp Fox of the

Sulphur,” leading a band of cutthroats all over northeastern Texas, western Arkansas, and northwestern Louisiana. Repeated raids on blacks, on white supporters of the Union, and on Union troops themselves, dealing death and terror, led Union army troops in the area to focus on his gang, in addition to other marauding groups. Allegedly,

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Medium 9781574410297

1: TWO VERY DIFFERENT UPBRINGINGS

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

1
Two Very Different Upbringings

I

During the post-World War II era, middle class workers populated the community of Lake Worth, Florida, a seaside community along the Atlantic Coast. Hard-working entrepreneurs penetrated markets, cultivated clients, and grew rich while economic Darwinism and American free enterprise eliminated the weak. Lake Worth's population doubled from 7,408 in 1940 to 15,315 in 1955.1 Charles Adolphus “C. A.” Whitman flourished in such an environment. He became a successful plumbing contractor as well as an accomplished, affluent and admired businessman. It had not always been that way.

C. A. Whitman knew his mother, but he spent much of his childhood in the Bethesda Orphanage in Savannah, Georgia. He overcame a lack of formal education by sheer determination and by out-working his competitors. His ruddy, round face and neatly cut slicked-to-the-side hair complimented a stocky, solid body. His appearance suggested he had “paid his dues.” Self-made and proud of it, he used his money to buy what he wanted, unapologetically. Some acquaintances, however, found his pride to be monumental egotism; he provided very well for his family—and never let them forget it.2

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Medium 9781574411805

One—“Stop right there or I’ll kill you!”

William T. Harper University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter One

July 24, 1974 • Day One

“Stop right there or I’ll kill you!”

—Fred Carrasco, hostage-taker

Ronald (Ron) Wayne Robinson kept looking at his watch, anxious to get home for his daughter Sheryle’s eleventh birthday party that night. Aline V. House was kicking herself for forgetting to bring her bloodpressure medication to work. Bobby G. Heard kept looking through the doorway to see if his relief was on his way up to take his place as the only guard in the prison library. Ann Fleming was thinking about her eighty-year-old mother in a Nashville, Tennessee, nursing home. Novella M. Pollard was worried about getting her rent check in the mail on time. Elizabeth

Yvonne (Von) Beseda’s concern was the alteration of her daughter ’s University of Texas cheerleader uniform. All in all, it was just a routine day in

Huntsville, Texas.

That routine ended abruptly with the roar a .357 caliber Ruger Speed Six, blue Magnum revolver made as it was fired in the confined quarters of the thirdfloor library of the State Penitentiary in Huntsville,

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Medium 9781574411805

Twelve—“If you want to come, just come ahead.”

William T. Harper University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter Twelve

July 26, 1974 • Day Three

“If you want to come, just come ahead.”

—Rudy Dominguez, hostage-taker

The morning sun bolted out of the swamps of western Louisiana, its rays slid across the Sabine

River and spiked through the Piney Woods of East

Texas. Another scorcher was on its way. The sun’s rays climbed twenty feet to the top of the walls surrounding the red brick fortress in Huntsville and spilled over into the prison yard. With the morning temperature already approaching eighty degrees— the high for the day would near the triple digits, and its late evening thermometer would hover near ninety.

Negotiations began again at 10:00 a.m. Warden

Husbands told Carrasco he would be given everything he demanded—helmets, walkie-talkies, clothing—everything, except the bulletproof vests.

“The bullet-proof vests were something we would not want to give them,” FBI-man Bob Wiatt said. As for the helmets, “the hostiles were more concerned about somebody coming up behind them and shooting them in the head. We didn’t want to make them totally impregnable with bulletproof vests and helmets. It

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Medium 9781574410297

6: AFTER MUCH THOUGHT

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

6
After Much Thought

I

During the summer of 1966 mass murder frequented the news. Truman Capote's In Cold Blood ushered in a “new journalism,” where real events were reported with fictional techniques. Capote engaged in a prolonged investigation to detail the mass murder of the Clutter family of Holcomb, Kansas, by two wanderers on 15 November 1959. Although first serialized in The New Yorker magazine in 1965, In Cold Blood was still the year's most talked about bestseller in 1966.

Mr. Herbert Clutter, an affluent wheat farmer, employed several farm hands. Floyd Wells, a former employee, later served time in the Kansas State Penitentiary where he became friends with a fellow prisoner named Richard E. Hickock, who made repeated efforts to learn as much about the Clutter family as possible. Specifically, Hickock was interested in finding out if the Clutters had a safe in their home. Wells either suggested or Hickock conjured up a nonexistent safe located in a wall behind Herb Clutter's office desk. Eventually, Hickock was paroled. Shortly afterwards he and a friend named Perry E. Smith headed for the Clutter home, where they expected to steal at least ten thousand dollars. They did not know that Herbert Clutter had a well-known reputation for not carrying cash; anyone in Holcomb could have told the pitiful fools that Herb Clutter paid for everything by check.

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Medium 9781574411676

6 A Position for Tragedy

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter six

A Position for Tragedy

“I don’t like him. He stares at me.”

—Linda Lowe

I

L

inda Lowe was not one to sit home alone with her two cats.

She very much enjoyed patrolling the Dallas nightclub scene to listen to musicians. On different occasions she had been a member of several “all-girl” musical groups. On Tuesday, June 26, 1984, she called her brother Wade and told him that later in the week she was going to a place called Ianni’s to listen to a band. Wade later related that she was looking for talented musicians to form a new group.1 She was an outgoing person who clearly liked being around others, so she may have grown tired of playing the piano by herself.

Linda was planning to surprise Wade for his upcoming birthday by picking him up in a limo and taking him out for a nice dinner. Those who knew Linda would not have been surprised by her “very generous” and considerate nature, her mother later said.

Linda even sent her brother a Father’s Day card. The bartenders at the nightclubs, who came to know her as a person and a performer, all gushed about how “sweet and nice” she was.2 No one, it seems, had anything negative to say about her—except Abdelkrim

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Medium 9781770904958

Slaves of Ontario

Mark Coakley ECW Press ePub

Slaves of Ontario

“Don’t you guys know that I spent $4,000 to get you?”

— Bob DeRosa

Manila, the Philippines, 2006.

Edwin Canilang, a skilled welder, noticed an advertisement for work in Canada, building ocean-going icebreakers. The pay was $23 an hour, plus food, lodging and overtime. Canilang was interested. He contacted a local recruiting company to apply for one of the positions. After undergoing medical tests, upgrading their technical skills and taking English lessons, all at their own expense, Canilang and 10 other Filipino men were offered positions as temporary foreign workers in Canada — for a fee of $12,500 paid to the recruiting company, supposedly to cover work permits and airfare. Some of the newly hired men borrowed money at high interest rates or sold all their belongings to meet the payment.

All of them now deeply in debt, they quit their jobs at home and said goodbye to their friends and families. For Canilang, leaving his family behind was especially difficult — his wife was pregnant with their third child.

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Medium 9781574413052

Chapter 1 A Good-Hearted Boy

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter 1

A Good-Hearted Boy

T

he menacing clouds and threat of rain did not deter the hundreds of people flocking to the small Texas town of Giddings to see Bill Long­ley die. The newly constructed wooden gallows waited silently some six hundred yards northwest of the railroad depot, where passengers alit by the score from incoming trains.

Although the execution was not scheduled until later in the afternoon of this dark, ominous October day, the main street of Giddings and the surrounding prairie teemed with the growing crowd from an early hour. They came by train, by carriage, by wagon and horseback, and on foot, black and white mingling single-mindedly as they awaited the carrying out of the court’s order and the end of the self-proclaimed mankiller’s odyssey. Stories circulated about a last-minute escape attempt and there were rumors that Long­ley had already survived one hanging.

Bill Long­ley had been confined now for not quite a year and a half, fighting this day as vigorously as he had willingly defied the conventions of his time. When captured, he had boasted of killing thirty-two men, even penning his memoirs in a Giddings newspaper and relishing the sensation he created throughout the state. He adopted for himself

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Medium 9781855758629

CHAPTER TEN: The tale of two psyches: case histories of juvenile sex offenders

Timothy Keogh Karnac Books ePub

“That self, that life of one’s own … is a composite structure which has been and is being formed and built up since the day of our birth, out of countless never-ending influences and exchanges between ourselves and others”

(Riviere, 1985, p. 358)

In this chapter, I present two case histories representing one from each of the two broad categories of young sexual offenders that have been discussed in previous chapters. In the case of the psychopathic offender, relating to others is achieved primarily through violence and sexualized violence. Psychopathic offenders divest themselves of any emotional investment in the other. Affect, the mediator between the somatic and psychological self, has been removed as a means of maintaining psychological equilibrium (McDougall, 1995). This is one solution which also has a unique psycho-biology. It is the endpoint of a developmental trajectory which has undoubtedly involved a threatening emotional environment lacking in safety and security and one in which the individual has had to defend himself against an object on which he ought to have been able to rely. Such a background often involves severe neglect and abuse, usually early in development and often continuing for lengthy periods of the child’s life. This developmental context results in the development of what Meloy (1997) refers to as the stranger self-object.

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Chapter 4 I Kept on Pumping Lead

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

4

I Kept on Pumping Lead

L

ong­ley said that he decided that the most practical way to get to Utah was by joining one of the many cattle drives headed north through the Indian Territory and terminating at the railhead at

Abilene, Kansas. According to him, he rode north to near Gainesville, in Cooke County not far from the Red River, and ran upon a large herd. The boss of the herd, a man named Rector, who Long­ley said came from Bee County in southwest Texas, hired Long­ley to go along on the drive, offering him pay of a dollar a day. Rector also furnished

Long­ley with an extra horse so that the horse Long­ley was riding could be turned out with the other extra horses on the drive in order to rest and gain a few pounds. Long­ley said that he picked out a horse and joined the trail drive as it headed into the Indian Territory.

Fuller quoted a letter from Long­ley that described his days with the trail drive as tedious, “following a big herd of cattle, seeing that none drop out by the wayside or are stolen and in the days of which

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Medium 9781574412246

5. Bring in the Pinkertons

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

five

Bring in the Pinkertons

Shortly after Pat Garrett began his work on the case, Governor

Thornton brought in additional help. Garrett was a man of action, a man who could round up the suspected parties. What Thornton sought next was a professional investigator. He called in the

Pinkertons.

The Pinkerton National Detective Agency had been founded in

1850 by Scottish immigrant Allan Pinkerton. For years, Pinkerton men served as ruthless strikebreakers and bodyguards, most notably for President Lincoln. Pinkerton private detectives also pursued some of the most wanted men in the West, among them the James and Younger gangs, the Hole-in-the-Wall gang, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, and the Wild Bunch.1

Thornton contacted the Pinkertons towards the end of February.

It had been worked out ahead of time with James Cree that their investigation would be paid for by the Southeastern New Mexico

Stock Growers’ Association. Cree also sent Thornton the letter he received from Colonel Fountain, dated October 3, 1895, showing

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Medium 9781770904958

The Morning after a Party

Mark Coakley ECW Press ePub

The Morning after a Party

“There were these huge steel doors that must have blocked off the marijuana from us, but everybody talked about it. All day long you would see these strange people walking in and out … The way the plant was put together, it was the perfect place for a marijuana operation. The rumors were rampant that it was a massive marijuana factory.”

— Anonymous source

Dismantling the Barrie grow op was dangerous, especially when police officers shut off the heat to the building, causing water pipes to freeze and burst, spraying water over live electrical wires. Twenty firefighters were kept on standby. There would be many more burst pipes and leaks to come — all fixed by reluctant handyman Larry McGee.

McGee had to do maintenance on the boilers twice every day. Escorted at all times by a pair of Barrie Police officers, he kept the boilers going and set up some propane space heaters to prevent more pipes from freezing. McGee also helped the police with other mechanical tasks, like fixing a broken door. Soon, he would demand a vacation, training his own replacement.

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