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Medium 9781574410723

5 Parole

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

5

Parole

“I don’t know why people got so excited;

I was just standing there with my knife.”

—Kenneth McDuff

I

At the time of the Broomstick Murders, Bill Miller was a law enforcement officer in the Fort Worth area. He remembers vividly the horrible deaths of Robert, Marcus, and Louise at the hands of Kenneth McDuff.

Later, he had firsthand experience with the McDuffs when he assisted in the investigation of Lonnie’s murder. One day in October 1989, while at his office at the Bell County Sheriff ’s Department, he took a call from a friend who owned a convenience store:

“Guess who just came in my store? Kenneth McDuff,” said the caller.

“Well, there’s going to be problems,” Bill said.1

On October 14, 1989, only three days after Kenneth McDuff walked out of prison, a pedestrian strolling the 1500 block of East Avenue N in

Temple came upon the body of a black female lying in a field of tall grass.

She was in her twenties, about 5’6” and weighed about 115–120 pounds.

She had been beaten and strangled, no more than twenty-four hours before her body was found. Within days, she was identified as a suspected prostitute named Sarafia Parker. Texas Ranger John Aycock later located and interviewed a witness who could allegedly place Parker in a pickup truck driven by McDuff on or about October 12, 1989. On that day, Kenneth McDuff had reported to his parole officer—in Temple. No other connection between the murder of Sarafia Parker and McDuff has ever been established or made public. Although the case is still open, at least officially, and McDuff was never accused of any crime involving

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Medium 9781770904958

Into the Labyrinth

Mark Coakley ECW Press ePub

Into the Labyrinth

“Keep eye for hidden walls + secret doors.”

— An officer at the Molson building raid

At eight the next morning, a Barrie Police sergeant went to the Canadiana Room, a large area just south of the fermentation tanks, now used as the office for several DeRosa companies. The fancy-looking room had a fireplace, mahogany beams and a high ceiling; an Emergency Response officer from Bolton would later describe it as a “ritzy office.” The Canadiana Room — which looked as if it had been designed by an advertising agency — was where Molson’s guests had once been given free beer at the end of a tour.

The sergeant spoke to one of Bob DeRosa’s assistant property managers, telling him that nobody would be able to access their vehicles on the property. The assistant manager told the officer that would be a big inconvenience for the tenant trucking companies, with their “just in time” delivery schedules. The sergeant was sympathetic but would not change his position.

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Medium 9781574413052

Chapter 14 Plenty of Ammunition

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

14

Plenty of Ammunition

A

fter killing the Reverend Lay, Bill Long­ley left Delta County, but there is only his fanciful account of where he was for the next year, as provided in Fuller’s heavily edited Adventures of Bill

­Long­ley.

According to Long­ley, on June 13, 1876, he rode north from Delta

County and camped near the Red River as it grew dark. He hid off the main road, ate a cold meal that he had gotten at Mr. Lane’s place, then slept on his saddle blanket. The next morning he took a ferry across the river and said that the ferryman told him of several parties who had crossed the night before into the Indian Territory looking for a man who had killed a preacher. Long­ley said that the ferryman looked at him with suspicion as Long­ley asked him questions, but Long­ley said that he learned that most members of the posse believed that the fugitive was still in Texas and that they planned to set up on roads leading into the Indian Territory and waylay Long­ley when he headed north.

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Medium 9781574411676

12 “An altered state of consciousness”

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter twelve

“An altered state of consciousness”

“Brain damage is fairly common.”

—Dr. John Mullen an Assistant Professor of

Neurological Surgery and Neurology

I

A

fter the defense rested, Norman Kinne lined up witnesses who had dealings with Belachheb and were ready to testify that he was perfectly sane. Oh, he was odd, and in their minds maybe a little crazy, but he was certainly someone who had enough mental capacity to know the difference between right and wrong.

The first of the witnesses was Beth.1 She was a secretary for a law firm and the person who had introduced Abdelkrim

Belachheb to Joanie. She described Belachheb as a selfish schemer who readily admitted that he needed to marry a woman who had money—an American who could help him secure permanent residency in the United States. According to Beth, he seemed to have found what he wanted in Joanie, who spent large sums of her limited income on his expensive tastes. He had nice clothes, memberships in clubs, and drank to excess in plush bars and restaurants (not to mention his custom wig). Beth even testified that

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Medium 9781574414974

17. “As Nice As I Could Be”

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

17

“As Nice As I Could Be”

“Hank, what on Earth made you believe you could walk away from this?”

—Charles Meyer

I

The Bell County Sheriff’s Office is not far from Bloom’s Motel. It just seemed like a long trip late in the afternoon of April 20, as Tim Steglich drove Hank to make a statement. At 5:25 P.M., Tim read Hank his Miranda warning. Tim tried to get in touch with a number of officers but could find no one. He did not want to leave Hank alone so he asked Deputy Ted Duffield to get in touch with Don Martin and J. W. Thompson of the Austin Police Department as soon as possible. Getting in touch with APD was the top priority—it was their case. Other officers could be contacted later.

Tim had to make an immediate decision. At the time, Hank was not a suspect or under arrest. Since he was making a voluntary statement, he could have asked for a lawyer at any time. Tim decided to get a brief statement first; he wanted the bottom line on paper—a girl was abducted from a car wash and McDuff did it. And so, Tim began slowly and carefully taking a statement for a case he was not that familiar with. As Hank spoke of kidnapping, rape, torture, and probable capital murder, Tim forced himself into a mode of extraordinary concentration. It was more important to get the statement than allow himself the luxury of normal emotion.1

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Medium 9781574412246

14. Jack Maxwell Testifies

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

fourteen

Jack Maxwell Testifies

The next day led off with the witness whom the prosecution had been waiting for. Jack Maxwell, who claimed he had been absent due to illness, was brought into town by Ben Williams. Maxwell was finally sworn in and took the stand.

Maxwell stated that he had known Lee and Gililland for five or six years and that his ranch was not very far from Lee’s. “On

February 1, 1896, I was at Dog Canyon ranch and spent the night there. I got there just before sundown. When I got there I found

Mrs. Lee [Oilver’s mother], Mr. Blevins, Mr. Bailey, and Ed, the colored man. I ate supper there that night and slept in the house with Mr. Blevins.”

“What time did you get up Sunday morning?” Childers asked.

“At sunup and I ate breakfast with Mr. Blevins and others.”

“Did you see either of these defendants there for breakfast?”

“No sir.”

“What did you do that day?”

“I stayed down at the corral.”

To an unknown question, Maxwell answered, “Saw four persons mounted on two horses coming from the northeast toward the house. They came within 200 yards from me and dismounted.”

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Medium 9781574410297

4: THE NICE FACADE

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

4
The Nice Facade

I

Charlie's involvement with Boy Scout Troop 5 of the Methodist Church and his reported membership in the Lion's Club suggest some openness to camaraderie, but he struggled to establish relationships. Members of study groups in the College of Engineering found him difficult to deal with. His life was complicated. He convinced himself that he had too much to do, and he seemed incapable of establishing priorities. A lifelong friend described him as a thinker and a planner, but he had serious problems deciding what to do with his life. In early 1964, Charlie wrote in his diary, “I would definitely like to develop an interest in electronics.…” He used the word “definitely” frequently in his notebooks and diary, yet he seldom displayed definitiveness. Perhaps Kathy's academic success and her timely graduation inspired his renewed drive towards finishing his degree program as early as possible. Or he may have interpreted her success in teaching as a blow to his ego. She provided most of the income and all of the health care coverage in their household. 1 Regardless, he took moderate to heavy course loads for the remaining semesters of his academic career.

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Medium 9781574410723

17 “As Nice As I Could Be”

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

17

“As Nice As I Could Be”

“Hank, what on Earth made you believe you could walk away from this?”

—Charles Meyer

I

The Bell County Sheriff ’s Office is not far from Bloom’s Motel. It just seemed like a long trip late in the afternoon of April 20, as Tim Steglich drove Hank to make a statement. At 5:25 P.M., Tim read Hank his Miranda warning. Tim tried to get in touch with a number of officers but could find no one. He did not want to leave Hank alone so he asked Deputy

Ted Duffield to get in touch with Don Martin and J. W. Thompson of the

Austin Police Department as soon as possible. Getting in touch with APD was the top priority—it was their case. Other officers could be contacted later.

Tim had to make an immediate decision. At the time, Hank was not a suspect or under arrest. Since he was making a voluntary statement, he could have asked for a lawyer at any time. Tim decided to get a brief statement first; he wanted the bottom line on paper—a girl was abducted from a car wash and McDuff did it. And so, Tim began slowly and carefully taking a statement for a case he was not that familiar with. As Hank spoke of kidnapping, rape, torture, and probable capital murder, Tim forced himself into a mode of extraordinary concentration. It was more important to get the statement than allow himself the luxury of normal emotion.1

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Medium 9781855758629

CHAPTER NINE: Implications for the assessment of the juvenile sex offender

Timothy Keogh Karnac Books ePub

The results of my study (discussed in Chapters Seven and Eight), along with the broad research literature base concerning juvenile sex offenders, make a case for the importance of assessing their capacity for attachment, level of detachment (psychopathy), psychopathology and empirical correlates of their internal world. In this chapter, I highlight some important issues in the assessment of juvenile sex offenders and recommend a battery of tests that facilitates the assessment of these constructs. I describe in some detail aspects of these instruments which I feel are particularly useful in articulating relevant motivational factors behind their offending. As the Rorschach (a part of the battery of tests I recommend) has been a somewhat controversial psycho-diagnostic test (despite the richness of assessment data it can yield), I also take up something of the controversy around the use of this instrument.

Starting with the proposition that juvenile sex offenders are not a homogeneous group in terms of their psychopathology, a careful assessment of differential offending-related variables is necessary to ensure the appropriateness of the approach to, and content of, their treatment. It is also important to determine who is most suitable for treatment and, in some rare instances, whether treatment is not indicated or is not feasible. These considerations relate in part to the issue of what has become known as treatment “responsivity”.

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Medium 9781574410297

16: APD

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

16
APD

I

Somehow, it seemed pathetically appropriate. Flags on the University of Texas campus had already been lowered in tribute to fifty-six-year-old retired Army Reserve Lieutenant Colonel Richard Bryant Pelton, who had died of a heart attack on the previous Friday. If Don Walden and Cheryl Botts still wondered why the flags were lowered, they could have read about Pelton in the Austin American-Statesman in a small article, hidden in the midst of an entire issue on the Tower sniping.1

The city of Austin and the University of Texas became the focus of world news. TASS, the official Communist Party news organ of the Soviet Union, used the occasion to highlight the problem of crime in the United States: “Murders, armed attacks, robbery, and rapes have become common in present-day America.” Richard Speck and Charles Whitman dwarfed coverage of the White House wedding of Luci Baines Johnson and Patrick Nugent. When reminded that the Speck murders in Chicago had been called the “Crime of the Century,” APD Chief Bob Miles replied, “It isn't anymore.” Reporters from all over the world interviewed witnesses, victims, and victims' families.2 Charlotte Darenshori, the secretary pinned down behind the base of a flagpole on the South Mall, remembered: “I had a call from Dan Rather wanting me to be on the afternoon news, from the networks and from newspapers everywhere. I just didn't understand the interest.”3

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Medium 9781574413052

Chapter 5 We Set Out in Fine Spirit

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

5

We Set Out in

Fine Spirit

W

hatever happened in Kansas, Long­ley continued northward, first to Omaha, Nebraska, then on to Cheyenne in Wyoming

Territory, where he said that he joined a party of miners preparing for an “exploring expedition” into the Big Horn range of mountains.1 He was welcomed by the leaders forming the group, including a Captain

Kuykendall, and on their instructions obtained necessary supplies and readied to leave immediately.2

The record backs up Long­ley’s account at this point. Judge W. L.

Kuykendall, late in 1869, had pondered the feasibility of organizing a semi-military group of prospectors to venture into the country above the North Platte River to displace the Sioux Indians there and look for gold. Discussing the idea with others, Kuykendall placed an advertisement in the Cheyenne newspaper for a meeting at McDaniel’s Theater. Elected president of the Black Hills and Big Horn Association at the meeting by eager prospectors, Kuykendall began recruiting an expedition, and ultimately, according to him, two thousand men volunteered, each agreeing to bring with him a “repeating gun,” one thousand rounds of ammunition, and rations for six months.3 According to

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Medium 9781574410297

17: WHY DID HE DO IT?

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

17
Why Did He Do It?

Often the test of courage is not to die but to live.—Conte Vittorio Alfieri (1794–1803), Italian playwright and poet

I

Once he returned to Austin, Governor John Connally assembled a blue-ribbon commission to look into every medical aspect of the Tower incident. The commission members were giants in their respective fields. Fact-finders consisted mostly of medical school professors. Dr. R. Lee Clark, Surgeon-in-Chief of the University's M. D. Anderson Hospital in Houston, served as the chairman. The work of the eleven fact-finding members was reviewed by twenty-one other blue-ribbon physicians from throughout the United States.1 The Connally Commission (for want of a better name) established four investigative objectives:

1. To determine the events and circumstances which surrounded the actions of Charles J. Whitman on August 1, 1966.

2. To explore the findings and to make such additional examinations as might be indicated by the factual information which is available.

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Medium 9781574412048

photo/image gallery

David Johnson University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574412246

18. Closing Arguments and the Verdict

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

eighteen

Closing Arguments and the Verdict

Before the closing arguments began, the attorneys argued as to whether the defendants could be found guilty of murder in the first, second, or third degree, or if it was to be first degree or nothing at all. The defense wanted only the latter option available to the jury.

Judge Parker ruled, “The court will submit the three degrees of murder to the jury.”1

The jury was brought in. Richmond Barnes opened the closing arguments for the prosecution. Barnes went through the chain of circumstantial evidence very thoroughly. He said that while one or a few coincidences might be explained, the whole chain could only be explained on the one hypothesis, that the defendants had murdered the Fountain child. His speech was described as “rather

flowery, and the figures of speech and quotations from The Pickwick

Papers probably went over the heads of the jury.” The interpreter had a difficult time translating some of this, and Barnes had to repeat his expressions. When speaking of Oliver Lee’s mother, who had testified as to Lee’s alibi, Barnes remarked that she had laid “a wreath of maternal duty on the altar of maternal love.” This was too much for the interpreter, and the prosecutor had to explain. Barnes spoke until the noon recess.2

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Medium 9781855758629

CHAPTER FOUR: Psychopathy and juvenile sex offending

Timothy Keogh Karnac Books ePub

“The determination at all costs not to risk again the disappointment and resulting rages and longings which wanting someone very much and not getting them involves”

(Bowlby, 1944, cited in Holmes, 1993, p. 87)

Psychopathy is synonymous with an obfuscation of the need for attachment. Bowlby (1944) described psychopaths as “detached”. Psychopathy can, therefore, be seen as representing psychopathology, which involves the most extreme incapacity for attachment. There is considerable evidence that implicates psychopathy in juvenile sex offending.

The nature of psychopathy

Psychopathy is regarded as a personality disorder. Drawing heavily on Cleckly’s (1941) work, Hare describes psychopathy as consisting of a characteristic pattern of interpersonal, affective, and behavioural symptoms so that, on an interpersonal level, psychopaths are shown to be grandiose, egocentric, manipulative, forceful, and cold-hearted. In terms of their affect, they display shallow and labile emotions and are unable to form long-lasting bonds to people, principles, and goals. They experience little anxiety, genuine guilt, or remorse. Behaviour-ally, psychopaths are impulsive and sensation seeking, and they readily violate social norms. The most obvious expressions of these predispositions “involve criminality, substance abuse, and a failure to fulfill social obligations and responsibilities” (Hare, 1991, p. 3).

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