205 Chapters
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1. Albert Jennings Fountain

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

one

Albert Jennings Fountain

Born Albert Jennings on Staten Island, New York, on October

23, 1838, Albert was the son of Solomon and Catherine Jennings.

The name Fountain came from his mother, who descended from a

French Huguenot family named de la Fontaine, which later turned into Fountain.1 Why Albert took the last name Fountain is unknown. One theory is that a mysterious murder in the Jennings family caused many members to take other names.2 Another suggests that Albert took the Fountain name so as not to give himself away as he searched in China for his then missing father.3

Fountain was educated in New York public schools and at Columbia College. It was said that during his Columbia days, at age

fifteen, he and five other students went on a tour of Europe and the

Far East. It was during this stage of Albert’s life that his father, a sea captain, was purportedly lost at sea. In Solomon Jennings’s last letter to his wife, written somewhere in the Orient, he wrote that food was running out and his crew was getting restless. He was never heard from again.

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11. Indictments

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

eleven

Indictments

Garrett and Perry began the next month working on Luis Herrera

(a different Herrera than was with the search party) after they received information that he might know where the bodies were, but this led to nothing.1

Not much progress was made in the investigation or the search for the bodies over the next two years. Fall, meanwhile, was able to have the cattle rustling indictments Fountain had brought against

Lee and McNew dropped.2

Pat Garrett had to run in the fall elections of 1896 in order to keep the office of sheriff. Garrett was a loyal, lifelong Democrat, but owed his position to the Republicans. Torn, Garrett decided to run as an

Independent and then registered as a Republican after an easy win.3

In the meantime, life went on in New Mexico. William Llewellyn served as a delegate in the Territorial Republican Convention and was elected to the Territorial House of Representatives, of which he became speaker.4 James Gililland married.5 So did Thomas

Branigan.6 Oliver Lee was a delegate for the Territorial Democratic

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3 “Pick on me”

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter three

“Pick on me”

“I can drive any woman in Belgium crazy.”

—Abdelkrim Belachheb quoted from notes cited in trial testimony

I

A

ccording to Interpol Rabat documents, Abdelkrim Belachheb was in Morocco as late as June 21, 1963, when he assaulted and wounded a man in a knife fight. Months later, Interpol Washington has him in Europe at age nineteen. Where he went first and his movements for the next year and a half cannot be established with certainty. Various documents and conflicting testimony have him arriving in either France or Switzerland. There is no indication that his family had helped him to get to Europe or that they even knew where he was. The troubled son could merely have been a fugitive from justice who cared little for the concerns of his family.

While being processed in a Texas prison in 1984, Belachheb indicated that he went first to “Pepignons” in France. In this instance, he may have been telling the truth. During that same interview he admitted that he had lived in Fes from 1958 through 1962, which was consistent with what his father told ABC News in 1985.

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9. The Cut

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

9

The Cut

“There’s an awful lot of weirdos out there, and you never know when you are going to meet one.”

—Richard Stroup, McLennan County Sheriff’s Deputy

I

Living her adult life in a culture with an absence of beauty took its toll on Brenda Kay Thompson. She looked much older than her age—thirty-seven. At 5’5” tall and weighing only 115 pounds, she was a small woman. Her drawn and hollow-looking face made her look emaciated, almost skeletal. What were once beautiful brown eyes were instead sunken into bony sockets surrounded by a rough complexion. She looked tired. Her tragic life gave her a “worn” look common among the “older” (both in terms of age and arrests) girls at the Cut. She had several aliases, including Debbie Johnson, and Debbie Ward. A criminal background check reveals a long history of a dozen or so petty crimes ranging from small thefts settled by paying fines to more serious charges of possessions of controlled substances carrying with them five- and six-year sentences. Additionally, she had a history of DWI and moving traffic violations, trespassing charges, and numerous counts of forgery.1

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Twenty-four—“I’ll see y’all soon.”

William T. Harper University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter Twenty-four

August 3, 1974 • Day Eleven

“I’ll see y’all soon.”

—Judy Standley, hostage

Of the original fifteen civilian and inmate hostages, twelve remained on Saturday, the third day of August.

After Glennon Johnson’s departure following a medical emergency, Father Joseph O’Brien had become the only true volunteer hostage. Inmate hostage Henry Escamilla had broken through the glass doors on the sixth day of the siege and Aline House was next to leave, after her heart attack hoax. Linda

Woodman was now safe in her Conroe home. Still held by Carrasco, Cuevas, and Dominguez were Von

Beseda, Jack Branch, Bert Davis, Ann Fleming, Novella

Pollard, Ron Robinson, Judy Standley, prison guard

Bobby Heard, Father O’Brien, and inmate hostages

Martin Quiroz, Steve Robertson and Florencio Vera.

Before this brutal day would end for the twelve hostages and three killers, their numbers would be cut down radically.

In the library, all the civilians slept rather fitfully, drained by their physical and mental exhaustion, and when they were roused shortly after sunrise they had a breakfast of eggs, ham, toast, coffee, and

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Chapter 3: “Stock War!”

David Johnson University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter 3

“Stock War!”

Records from the early 1870s illustrate the growing animosity over cattle once the trade became profitable. Mason County’s problems began during Reconstruction. The successful removal of Franz

Kettner as Hide and Cattle Inspector for Mason County during 1872 was an early attempt to dominate the cattle trade by Ben Gooch, a rancher with widespread cattle interests. In this, Mason County was not unique in either the state or the region. As early as 1871, Llano

County stockmen petitioned the government for prohibitions on mavericking, noting in part that “We would further represent that there are many persons Killing Calves in the woods and Marking & Branding calves & yearlings who are known to own no Cattle of any description whatever.”1 In San Saba County, county officers asked Richard

Coke “for an organization of some kind of armed force” for protection against “hostile Indians & other marauding parties” who were “continually depredating” on the property and lives of the citizens.2

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Chapter 19 Hanging is My Favorite Way of Dying

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

19

Hanging is My Favorite

Way of Dying

A

s Bill Long­ley faced his transfer to Giddings and coming one step closer to the gallows, his father was apparently not faring very well. Bell County Judge Erastus Walker submitted a petition to the state government on behalf of Campbell Long­ley requesting a petition for financial assistance stemming from his service in the Texas army in 1836. Walker described the sixty-two-year-old Campbell as

“too old to labour for a support, that he has several in family to provide for and has no one to assist him to make a support for himself and family—that his health is not good—that he is poor and needy, in fact in indigent circumstances and that he was in said condition on the

1st of July, 1876.”1 In May, 1874, Campbell had filed a pension claim, which was approved for $250.2

Whether or not Bill Long­ley was aware of this is unknown. His uncle Alexander Preston Long­ley, known as “Pres,” sent a letter in

August on behalf of his condemned nephew to President Rutherford

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Six—“Put down your arms and surrender safely.”

William T. Harper University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter Six

“Put down your arms and surrender safely.”

—TDC Director, Jim Estelle, Jr.

Montemayor’s contact with Carrasco seemed to bring progress. Carrasco assured him that if the authorities did not “charge me, the hostages will be safe.”1 A hand-written message from Estelle was sent to the library. “You have not harmed anyone,” it read.

“Neither have we. We cannot dishonor the hostages by placing them in greater danger by delivering more weapons to you . . . we cannot do more than ask you to consider the feelings of your own family and the feelings of your hostages and their family. Put down your arms and surrender safely.”2

Carrasco was told if he freed his civilian prisoners along with Heard and gave himself up, his attorney would witness his safe surrender in front of the media to make sure “we do not hurt you, injure you, brutalize you . . .”3 What they were telling him was they would give him almost anything he wanted—except exit from the prison. The mercurial Carrasco flew into a rage and negotiations fell apart. By now, Father

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Chapter 11 Bill Was Still Fighting

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

11

Bill Was Still Fighting

T

he Lee County sheriff mounting the search for the Long­ley brothers was James McKeown, the father of Bill’s early criminal companion, Johnson. Sheriff McKeown was elected as Lee County’s first sheriff on June 2, 1874.1 But the posse led by James McKeown never came close to the fleeing brothers, who headed north after leaving Burleson County.

Jim later recalled2 that they initially steered clear of settlements where they might be recognized. Camping out in the open each night,

Jim hunted and killed swamp rabbits to eat with the bacon and bread they had brought with them. They approached the Brazos River, heading toward Bryan, and encountered a black man with three yokes of steers that he was taking to Caldwell. The two outlaws, apparently feeling their oats, made the man “dance,” riding on after rewarding him with a half-quart of whiskey. One can only suspect what happened to the other half-quart.

Riding into Bryan, Bill stopped at a saloon to get more whiskey.

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7 “Take that . . . ”

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter seven

“Take that . . . ”

“The movies don’t even come close.”

—Norman* piano player for the Mike Harris Quartet

I

T

he Mike Harris Quartet had been playing soft music since

9 P.M., and by the time midnight came along, they were getting no requests or tips. “Hey, it was a Thursday night,” said Norman, the piano player. They played Duke Ellington’s C Jam Blues before taking a break just after midnight. Sherlyn, the featured singer, turned on taped music and went to the end of the bar where Mary and Dick were talking and laughing.

From the time Belachheb arrived to just after midnight, he had three or four Johnny Walker and 7Up. He roamed around the entire barroom and spoke to nearly all of the women. He even danced with a few, but he always came back to Marcell.

“Marcell was the kind of person if she was annoyed with somebody you could tell quite immediately,” Dick observed. He noticed, as did almost everyone else, that Marcell wanted less and less to do with Belachheb as the night wore on. Some of the other regulars, less than enchanted by her brusque ways, recall that she could, at times, be cruel. “I had seen her before come on to a man sitting next to her and then belittle him in front of people,” remembered a Ianni’s bartender.

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Chapter 6: “Rance and Co.’s Band of Freebooters”

David Johnson University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter 6

“Rance and Co.’s Band of Freebooters”

On July 12 the summer term of District Court opened in Mason

County. Although no one realized it at the time, the summer session was a pivotal moment in the feud. Three separate murder cases and the Baccus cattle theft case were all on the books to be heard. All of these cases were critical to ending mob law, and trouble was anticipated by legal authorities not involved with the mob. Dan Roberts recalled that he received a note from the judge instructing him not to turn Johnson over to any sheriff, undoubtedly to prevent another lynching. When the time came, Roberts brought Johnson into Mason under heavy guard.1

From the mob’s perspective the charges against Charley Johnson for his role in the Baccus case were clearly important. They anticipated a conviction based upon the very evidence they had used in deciding to lynch the Baccuses. In this they were doomed to disappointment. Both Johnson and John Martin, if the latter were ever brought to trial, were acquitted. It was a clear indication that the charges against Baccus and his men could not have been sustained and served to tarnish the mob’s reputation in the minds of some as having lynched innocent men. Johnson was also called before the grand jury in an attempt to identify mob members involved in the

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Chapter 6. A Man of Low Instinct and Habits

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press ePub

Chapter 6

A Man of Low Instinct and Habits

A comparison of Longley’s version of his adventures in the Northwest with the official record concerning Camp Stambaugh truly reveals his artful ability to mix fact with fiction in order to project the desperado image he sought. The truth does not do much for that image.

When Longley was captured in 1877, according to the account given by Fuller, he claimed that after the Kuykendall expedition broke up, he was broke and stranded, so he applied to the army quartermaster for a job as a teamster. He said that his job was to drive a sixmule team between Camp Brown and Fort Bridger hauling supplies and equipment. Because of the Indian threat, he said that there were usually four or five wagons in each caravan, guarded by a detachment of cavalrymen. Longley alleged that on September 15 (probably 1870, although no year is given), a caravan was attacked by some 130 Indians between South Pass City and the Green River on a creek that he called the Dry Sandy, which lies to the southeast of South Pass. Longley said that after much shooting and yelling and the loss of one of their men, the Indians were driven off. As will be seen, Longley could not possibly have been present at that fight, if it occurred, even as a soldier.

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Appendix II

David Johnson University of North Texas Press PDF

Appendix II

A key event of the Mason County War was what correspondent

David Doole termed the “Big Raid” in a letter that was published in the San Antonio Herald of August 14, 1874. This is referred to in the response published in the Burnet Bulletin of September 5, 1874 by

A. G. Roberts. Doole’s letter has not been located to date, but on

August 29, 1874, the San Antonio Daily Express published the following article. From the existing references to Doole’s correspondence, the article appears to have been drawn, with some editorial changes, from that letter. Its significance is demonstrated by the fact that both newspapers considered it important enough to publish the lengthy correspondence.

STOCK WAR!

_____

Mason County Under Arms—A Promised

Revenge and Partial Execution

____

[Correspondence Fredericksburg Sentinel]

MASON, TEXAS, Aug. 18, 1874

On the ninth of August, 1874, John Clark, Sheriff of Mason county, with a posse of 18 men, went after a set of cow hands of Al. Roberts, who had made a raid into Mason county and driven off 200 head of cattle.

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Chapter 2. These Desperate Scoundrels and Out Laws

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press ePub

Chapter 2

These Desperate Scoundrels and Out Laws

The Civil War ended in 1865, and Texas struggled to restore some equilibrium throughout its many communities. Young Bill Longley reportedly dropped out of his schooling and acquired a six-shooter and a horse, like many other young men in those unsettled times. And thus began the confusing mixture of fact and fiction that complicates a straightforward telling of Longley’s short criminal career.

Some have written that in 1866, fifteen-year-old Longley jumped a train in order to go to Houston, where he could get his hands on a pistol. This seems a little contrived, given the ready availability of firearms. However, as the story goes, in the teeming streets of Houston, he saw firsthand how “the newly-freed Negroes had taken over the new State Police and created clashes with the white man.”

Longley supposedly took up with another young white man, and having nowhere to stay, they decided to bed down in an alley. According to the story, they were confronted by a blue-uniformed black policeman swinging a lead ball on a leather thong, commonly called a mace. The officer demanded to know what they were doing and, instead of searching them, ordered them to undress. Longley’s companion suddenly pulled a knife from under his shirt and stabbed the officer to death. Longley grabbed the officer’s Texas-manufactured “Dance” revolver and the two boys fled. Longley immediately returned to Evergreen, the proud possessor of his first firearm, or at least so the story goes.1 Unfortunately, there is no documented basis for this story and it seems a little far-fetched.

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Appendix IV

David Johnson University of North Texas Press PDF

Appendix IV

The following list was developed by Glenn Hadeler based upon the assumption that men who band together have other affiliations in common. The list presents a scientific approach to determining some of the mob members during the Hoo Doo War but should not be interpreted as a definitive fact. It was first presented at the Second

Hoo Doo War Symposium held at Mason, Texas, during 2003.

Llano

Leather Jackets

Methodist

Church

August 1874

Clark Posse

Carl Bader

Mathew Bast

Jacob Bauer

Wilhelm Bickenbach

Peter Bickenbach

Fred Brandenberger

Otto Donop

Mathew Bast

Jacob Bauer

Wilhelm Bickenbach

Peter Bickenbach

Fred Brandenberger

Otto Donop

Jacob Durst

George Durst

Jacob Durst

Heinrich Hasse

Frederick Hoerster

William Hoerster

Ernst Jordan

Dietrich Kothmann

Fritz Kothmann

William Kothmann

Carl Lehmberg

Germans Mentioned

In the Hoo Doo War

Carl Bader

Peter Bader

Bernard Durst

Heinrich Hasse

Frederick Hoerster

William Hoerster

Daniel Hoerster

Ernst Jordan

Peter Jordan

Dietrich Kothmann

Fritz Kothmann

William Kothmann

Carl Lehmberg

250

Henry Doell

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