2894 Chapters
Medium 9780253002358

7 Going South

Rudolf A. Raff Indiana University Press ePub

Near the end of my undergraduate life, I set about blissfully applying to graduate schools, including Duke. There was lurking a possible slight hitch to entering this dream world; I had a commitment to serve two years of active duty in the U.S. Navy after commissioning as an ensign (the naval term for what the army calls a second lieutenant). However, the navy seemed to have had an excess of young officers entering at the time and readily allowed anyone qualified to have eighteen months in the inactive reserves to get a master’s degree before going on active duty. The master’s degree limit seemed like a constraint, but I hadn’t met Bill Byrne yet. Bill was a biochemistry professor at Duke who served as the departmental graduate program director. He was undaunted by both the department’s and the navy’s rules and worked out an acceptance for me to take a master’s degree, which the navy approved. He then produced a second letter to convince the navy that as Duke didn’t really like to give a master’s in biochemistry, it would be far better to let me stay on for a Ph.D. In a miracle of bureaucratic accommodation, they approved that too.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253008596

Chapter 24

Rebecca McClanahan Indiana University Press ePub

Briarwood Cottage

Mrs. Sylvia Sanders

Battle Ground, Indiana

Dear Sister,

How time goes! and me with so little to show for that, me who should be making the most of it. The weather being what it has been I have fared very well. Kept busy keeping the fire going and feeding myself and the cats.

Eldon was just in with my groceries. Just got a note off to Barbara. I had a letter from her yesterday, said your leg was much better. I am doing all right so far so don’t worry and don’t take any chances.

Bye now Bessie

“Taking chances” meant, for Bessie, all those things so-called experts said that women her age should never do—venturing out alone, walking on icy steps. Old bones break easily, and hip fractures are the first step toward the nursing home, so Bessie had heard. So, she’d dutifully dispense advice to her little sister, but as Bessie often wrote, Ugh! Not for mine! Good heavens, she’d been going up and down the springhouse steps since she was a teenager. Why should she stop now? Apart from those days when Sant was sick, Bessie had never set foot in a hospital and didn’t intend to.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781770906730

2: TALKING DRUMS IN DEATH VALLEY

Neil Peart ECW Press ePub

TALKING DRUMS IN DEATH VALLEY

FEBRUARY 2011

THE SETTING OF THE OPENING PHOTOGRAPH is Death Valley National Park, California, near the site called Natural Bridge. The snow-topped Panamint Mountains form the backdrop, while I am gesticulating and (no doubt) pontificating in the middle, surrounded by the people and cameras of the Hudson Music crew. The subject of my little speech was drumming—specifically, drumming in front of an audience.

So that explains the title, but suggests a number of other questions. Starting with, I suppose, “Um … why?”

Well, it started in 1995, when I made an instructional video about composing drum parts and recording them, called A Work in Progress. My collaborators on that project were Paul Siegel and Rob Wallis, and we had enjoyed working together, sharing our ideas and realizing them on film. Paul and Rob were both drummers who had gravitated to the educational side, founding the Drummer’s Collective in New York City, then later Hudson Music, to make instructional DVDs. They were around the same age as my bandmates and me, and likewise had enjoyed a long, productive partnership of close to the same duration, so we understood one another.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253011596

7: The Last Fight 1923–1935

Rachel Berenson Perry Indiana University Press ePub

1923-1935

FORSYTH'S PAINTING THE SMOKER WON THE Mary T. R. Foulke Purchase Prize of $150 at the Richmond Art Association's Twenty-second Annual Exhibition in 1923. Calling it “that portrait of myself with a cigarette in my mouth,” Forsyth wrote to Dorothy, “I'm afraid I won't be a good example to the Richmond High School kids with that cigarette…and that impudent grin in evidence, as if I didn't give a whoop who saw me…. I never dreamed of it getting a prize and really didn't want to part with it…. Well, the prize money will come in handy.”1

In fact, the prize money was sorely needed. Extra income from awards and judging paid the tuition for the three girls’ Butler University education, which were high priorities in the Forsyth family.2 Despite his regular employment at Herron, occasional artwork sales, and some painting repair work, the Forsyths always struggled to make ends meet. Alice continually patched, sewed, and refashioned to keep her family respectably clothed, and the garden provided fresh vegetables and canned goods. They made their own cherry juice and raised chickens in their spacious backyard.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253352545

1. Playing in Peoria

Bob Hammel Indiana University Press ePub

1

Playing in Peoria

Billy Cook spent first grade in nine schools, in nine towns. He averaged entering a new town and a new school every month in and around his family’s uprootings and moves.

That explains it all, of course. No wonder the William Alfred Cook who survived that year is so …

Unbridled?

Self-reliant?

Eternally curious?

Stubborn? Temperamental, even?

Adaptable?

Is there room in there for …

Successful?

If that sputtering scholastic start really was what made Indiana businessman Bill Cook a billionaire, and the word got around, there’d be peripatetic parents botching up school enrollment patterns all over the country.

A Widow at Twenty-three

The Great Depression was tightening its chokehold on America when Cook was born in Mattoon, Illinois, on Tuesday, January 27, 1931, the first and only child of George and Cleo Cook. He arrived on what his mother remembered as an unusually warm day for January. She also remembered the sound of an Illinois Central Railroad train whistle blowing somewhere close at the very moment of her son’s birth, 6:10 PM. His dad couldn’t be there; he was in Wisconsin making rural sales calls on his $10-a-day Depression job.

See All Chapters

See All Chapters