162 Chapters
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Chickens

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

Chickens

At one point in my life I decided that nailing metal shoes on large animals wasn’t exciting enough, so I became a gentleman farmer. It wasn’t much of a farm, just a corner lot in a suburban tract in Northern California, but to me it was everything. I started with chickens. A real farm has chickens. Wearing my brand-new leather farmer’s gloves, I built a chicken coop out of old scrap lumber and chicken wire. It was magnificent—just like the how-to-build-a-chicken-coop book said. It even had little rooms (the book called them nests) where the chickens could lay their eggs, and where I could sneakily open a back door and snatch the eggs out from under the hens.

I threw handfuls of sawdust all over the bottom of their cage for them to walk on, and went out to get some chickens.

I bought some White Leghorns because the guy at the feed store told me that they were the ones that laid the eggs. I may rarely believe anything a horse owner tells me, but I always believe everything the guy at the feed store tells me. I put them all in the pen. It wasn’t very exciting. They just looked at each other. Over the next few days, except for when my neighbor would throw garbage over the fence for them, their lives were pretty much hum-drum. I knew that cows who listened to music gave more milk, but I wasn’t sure if entertainment would increase egg production. I felt like I should do something for them, so I introduced a different colored hen into the group. She was a Rhode Island Red, actually what is called a sex-link, but I don’t think I can explain that. My children, who thought Dad had gone over the edge, but were rather entertained by it all, to my embarrassment named this newcomer Henny Cluck.

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22 The Latino Comedy Project and Border Humor in Performance

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

JENNIFER ALVAREZ DICKINSON

This is a nation of aliens, going back to the
first one: Christopher Columbus.

GEORGE LOPEZ, ALIEN NATION, 1996

In a 2007 article for the Huffington Post, Roberto Lovato calls attention to the proliferation of anti-immigrant humor in mainstream entertainment, particularly anti-Latino immigrant humor, providing several recent examples of demeaning humor: at the 2007 Emmys, Conan O’Brien showed a clip depicting his writing team as day laborers; one of Bill Maher’s August 2007 “New Rules” is a ban on fruit- and vegetable-scented shampoos, quipping, “Gee, your hair smells like a migrant worker”; and Jay Leno observes that illegal immigrants arrested for prostitution are “just doing guys American hookers will not do” (Lovato). While it may be tempting to dismiss these jokes as simply comedic gaffes, they are reflective of a larger anti-immigrant discourse that has resurfaced in recent years, what Otto Santa Ana calls an “explosion” of anti-immigrant representations in American popular culture (Santa Ana 2009). With the emergence of border vigilante groups, increased proposals for immigration legislation, the ongoing construction of a border wall, and cable news anchors regularly vilifying immigrants, it is clear that advocates for immigrant rights face significant challenges in shifting public opinion. Despite the long history and significant economic and cultural contributions of Latinos in the United States, fears of terrorism and an economic slowdown can easily reverse gains made in improving the popular images of Latinos and Latino immigrants. As Santa Ana points out in Brown Tide Rising, “human thinking, at base, is not mathematical code or logical expression. Human thought is constructed with images that represent reality” (Santa Ana 2002, xv).

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13 Lila Downs’s Borderless Performance: Transculturation and Musical Communication Brenda M. Romero

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

BRENDA M. ROMERO

Suddenly, everyone is interested in Lila Downs! Her musical performances appeal to multiethnic, multilingual, and transnational audiences across hemispheres, gender boundaries, and musical cultures. These audiences include progressive academics, political activists, and radical artists with political consciences. Who is this remarkable new vocalist/ composer? Lila Downs made her debut into the mainstream with four song credits in the acclaimed film Frida,1 where she appears singing in the tango and bedside scenes. Certainly her proximity to the Frida cult via the movie has led her to capitalize on the pop cultural Frida image, as her critics are quick to notice, but Lila also claims indigenous ancestry, holds a bachelor’s degree in anthropology on Oaxacan textiles, and is a musical activist. Lila Downs is the daughter of a Caucasian father and a Mixtec2 mother; she straddles the middle of a divided world. This essay celebrates Lila Downs’s artistic contributions and proposes that she offers a truly new brand of musical performance that not only represents her own journey of personal discovery but also integrates diverse musical ideas and fuses deeply layered indigenous ideas and beliefs about music with sounds and lyrical imagery. The result is truly engaging for listeners on both sides of the US–México border.

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Medium 9780253346988

8. “Me”

Abraham Aamidor Indiana University Press ePub

John Wooden sat in a cramped den in his suburban Los Angeles condominium where he has lived thirty years, in a room crowded by an old sofa and recliner, at a desk buried beneath mounds of correspondence, and just under a wall plastered with photos of all his UCLA championship basketball teams. It’s not that Coach Wooden dwells on the accolades and all the old titles. It’s just that this is how his late, beloved wife Nell, a fellow Hoosier from southern Indiana he met at Martinsville High School, decorated the room, and that is how the room will remain until the end. Unseen in this living history museum, though, behind several autographed leather basketballs on one shelf and yet more trophies and other mementos on another, are the indelible tracks of all the other early Hoosier basketball legends that Wooden says enriched his life, and America’s, because of their love for the game of basketball, such as Everett Case, Ward “Piggy” Lambert, Tony Hinkle, Charles “Stretch” Murphy, and many others. One of those men was Chuck Taylor, a man Wooden first saw when Chuck put on a little clinic for the Artesians—that was Martinsville High School’s nickname, after a flowing well in the town—and the two men became fast friends years later, after Wooden moved to Los Angeles in 1948 and Chuck followed suit in 1950. The two lived mere blocks away from each other for seven years. “I had a lot of fun with Chuck,” Wooden reminisced. “I think maybe we enjoyed being hicks from Indiana, small towns in Indiana. We were Hoosiers. We had a lot in common and I think we were more comfortable than we would be with a lot of others, whether it was other basketball coaches or people in other areas.”

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14 El Macho: How the Women of Teatro Luna Became Men Paloma Martínez-Cruz & Liza Ann Acosta

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

PALOMA MARTÍNEZ-CRUZ & LIZA ANN ACOSTA

ma·cho adj
having or showing characteristics conventionally regarded as typically male, especially physical strength and courage, aggressiveness, and lack of emotional response

n
a male who displays conventionally typical masculine characteristics1

If we accept Schechner’s claim that performance is “twice behaved behavior,” we must then ask, what is the force of that repetition?2

PEGGY PHELAN, THE ENDS OF PERFORMANCE

The play Machos, created and performed by Teatro Luna, Chicago’s all-Latina theatre company, illuminates the project of el macho. Accepting performance as “twice behaved behavior,” Machos interrogates the echoes of patriarchal conventions by dramatizing the boundaries of normative masculinity. The force compelling repetition of el macho’s gestures, vocabulary, and drives is immediate and all-encompassing: minutes into the play, the cast, donning contemporary urban Latino drag, tells us, “I learned it from my dad.” Socialization of the macho begins at birth and is reinforced at every juncture with pressures from peer groups, by mass communication, and by intimate relations and strangers alike. To relinquish any aspect of the performance of machismo is to be deemed less than a man. Our paper on Teatro Luna’s staged iteration of this high-stakes repertoire submits that the company’s performance of gender is a political act that ultimately awakens audience members to their own complicity in the construal of machismo: the revelation that gender is a ritual, rather than a biological imperative, implies that we are each an officiant laying down the liturgy of el macho. As an anti-oppression theater project, the ultimate aim of Machos is to denaturalize the binary construct of woman/man that habilitates patriarchal hegemony and to activate new social engagement with gender and sexuality as a dynamic continuum, a process of becoming, rather than a state of being.

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Medium 9781626567719

A Index of Stories

Peterson, Rick; Hoekstra, Judd Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Introduction: Rick and Izzy

Rick and Izzy (Rick Peterson and Jason Isringhausen), p. 1

Chapter 1: Reframing—The Shortest Path from Threat to Opportunity

Reframing examples (Jack Cakebread, Colonel Lewis Burwell Puller, Ronald Reagan), p. 9

Chapter 2: Why Reframing at Crunch Time Is Necessary

Reframing Cole’s hockey tryout (Judd, Sherry, and Cole Hoekstra), p. 28

Chapter 3: Reframing from Trying Harder to Trying Easier

Take the grunt out. (Sandy Koufax), p. 43

The accidental world record (Katie Ledecky), p. 44

Try Easy applied to filmmaking (Steven Soderbergh), p. 45

Be extraordinary by being ordinary. (Rick Peterson and the 2001 Oakland A’s pitching staff), p. 49

I don’t need to be better than I already am. (Millionaires’ Magician Steve Cohen), p. 49

Chapter 4: Reframing from Tension to Laughter

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Medium 9780253008589

Indiana AT Evansville, 11-16-11 (94-73)

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

Indiana Hoosiers forward Cody Zeller (40) tries to lay the ball in as Evansville Aces guard/forward Kenneth Harris (32) defends during the Indiana Evansville basketball game at the Ford Center in Evansville, Ind., Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2011.

By Dustin Dopirak

After Indiana’s surgical evisceration of Evansville on Wednesday night, the question posed to Tom Crean and his players sounded like a reasonable one.

In Crean’s four years, the Hoosiers had won games by bigger margins and earned victories of much more gravity against much stronger teams. But those more important victories were mostly nailbiters, and none of those blowouts came against a team as respectable as this Evansville squad, which was coming off a 16-16 season in the revered Missouri Valley Conference and a season opening win over Butler.

So was IU’s 94-73 win at Evansville in front of 9,640 at the brand new Ford Center the Hoosiers’ best all-around performance in Crean’s three-plus years of rebuilding?

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Medium 9780253010285

17 I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Someone had put coal in the Spuds’ Christmas stockings. Mercifully Pete did not force the team to practice on Christmas Day, but he held practice on Christmas Eve and on the day after Christmas and on every other day over Christmas break. The practices were every bit as merciless as they had been in the preseason, if not more so. Pete, however, backed off from any special focus on Joe Lents, who nevertheless retreated into a quiet funk, while the rest of the team waited for him to return his head to winning basketball. It would take a while.

Joe was not about to get over the incident quickly. In January and February, his scoring markedly declined from the sixteen points he was averaging per game prior to the tourney. Most games he barely reached double figures. Before the holidays, Joe was fourth in the conference in scoring. By the end of the regular season, he had dropped to ninth. This was not the way he had wanted his senior season to go, but he just could not get himself motivated to play his best for Pete Gill.

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The Youngest Cowboy

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

The Youngest Cowboy

One of my daughters teaches at an expensive private daycare/grade school facility and she tells me stories about some of the younger students, the four- and five-year-olds. Some of them seem to have quite a time of it. If they don’t get their way, or some other kid takes their toy, they throw all kinds of fits. They cry, scream, throw themselves on the floor, hit everyone around them, run out of the building. The choices are unlimited. The teachers then have to reach into the bag of tricks learned in their child behavior classes at college and come up with some method to quell the outburst without doing any emotional or physical damage to the kid. If they touch the kid they will be sued, of course, by irate parents who do not believe in spanking their children or doing anything else that might traumatize them. These parents probably allocate 10 percent of their income to buy child behavior books and take parenting classes in order to raise the perfectly adjusted child. No physical punishment, no criticism, no loud voices. The child must be respected and allowed to participate in its own development. “I understand you are angry at your little sister, but can you think of a different way to show your displeasure? Setting her hair on fire is not really fair to her. Would you like to tell us how you feel about that?” There are hundreds of themes like this.

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Medium 9781574416527

Chapter 11 - That's More Bull Than I'd Like to Ride (1965–1969)

Mitchel P. Roth University of North Texas Press ePub

“Had my ribs, nose and arm broken, but after all a guy has to have a hobby.”

—Lala Markovich, 1965

THE tumult of the 1960s caught up to the Texas prison system in the second half of the decade. “Treatment by race” had been one of the most salient features of the system since its inception. This began to change in 1965 when George J. Beto desegregated individual prison units. Well aware of the logistical problems that would result, Beto went ahead and desegregated the units anyway, paving the way for different races to coexist in the Texas prison system, mirroring the racial coexistence that had characterized the prison rodeo arena since the 1930s.

However, inmates were still housed by race in separate dorms and cell blocks within the prison units and for years did not mix in the dining halls or even in the agricultural hoe squads. So, while inmates of all races might have gone about their daily routines in the same prison units, black, white, and Hispanic inmates did it in their own segregated wings and labored in segregated field forces. It would take another decade for the Texas prison system to actually alter its state-sanctioned system of racial segregation.1

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1 Gloomsday

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

On the morning of Saturday, June 16, 1962, the sun rose over southern Indiana like an orange Rawlings basketball, but by midday it had morphed into an angry yellow seed hanging hot and sour over the tiny hamlet of Ireland, where the mood was decidedly glum. Coach Jerome “Dimp” Stenftenagel, beloved by nearly everyone in and around the village of some four hundred souls, had tendered his resignation at the end of the school year, following six consecutive winning seasons. In the last three, he had amassed a total of 59 wins against only six losses and had gone undefeated in the Patoka Valley Conference. These were easily the three winningest seasons in Ireland High School history, which stretched back to 1915.

Unfortunately, like every Ireland coach who had come before him, Dimp had never won a Sectional, had never gotten past the first round of the storied free-for-all Indiana state tournament. And like all but one Ireland coach before him, he had never beaten Jasper, the Spuds’ big and reviled neighbor to the east. And now nearly everyone in Ireland recognized that 1962 had been Dimp’s best chance—their best chance—maybe for a long time, because that tall and talented starting front line of Dave Baer, Ronnie Vonderheide, and Bill Small had graduated and was gone, and the replacements—most at least a head shorter than Baer, Vonderheide, and Small—were not promising. The golden era was finished.

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24 Keep Your Pants On

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

While nearly all of Ireland was sleeping off a colossal hangover, the ever-disciplined Jim Roos awoke at his usual early hour on Sunday with one thought forefront in his mind: preventing the publication of Ernie Begle’s photo of a trouserless Pete Gill. In the crush and excitement of the celebration, Jim had not been able to corral Begle before he returned to Jasper with his camera, yet Jim believed there was still time to accomplish his objective, since the next edition of the Jasper Herald would not be published before Monday.

Instead of calling Begle, however, he rang up Begle’s boss, Herald sports editor Charlie MacPherron. The transaction required all of Jim’s considerable negotiating skills. MacPherron had not yet seen the photo, but Begle had called to inform him of the treasure he had obtained, and, based on Begle’s description, MacPherron regarded it as a surefire winner for publication. In response, Jim tried to impress upon MacPherron the negative ramifications for Ireland, the school, and Pete Gill if the photo were to be published. MacPherron argued that not publishing the photo would mean serious lost revenue from sales of the Monday edition. A photo like that would surely mean a sellout and an extended print of the paper. In other words, there was real money involved for the Herald. It was just good business to print the photo. To counter, Jim offered the Herald an exclusive interview with Pete Gill in trade, and MacPherron reluctantly relented. Thus assured the photo would not appear, Jim allowed himself a much-needed day of relaxed worship and rest.

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The Bad Job?

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

The Bad Job?

I thought I had done a bad job on one particular horse I shod in Northern California. A quite pleasant lady had called to set up an appointment to shoe her mare. She said she would meet me at the pasture because she was the only one who could catch the mare. She told me the horse was easy to shoe, just hard to catch.

I showed up on the appointed date and was pleased to see that the horse was, in fact, easy to shoe. I enjoyed talking with the lady, and I enjoyed shoeing her horse. I figured I had done a good job. I gave my usual suggestion to the owner that the shoeing should be done every eight weeks. With my regular customers I always pull out my appointment book and schedule the next visit, but with new customers I hesitate to do that in case they decide they don’t like my work and don’t want me back in eight weeks. I’ll wait for them to call me. I told her she should call me, or some other shoer, around that time to pull off the shoes and either trim and put new shoes on, or just trim the feet. If you leave the shoes on past eight weeks, the feet will just keep growing and the horse might go lame. She said she would call me.

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7 Performing Indigeneity in a South Texas Community: Los Matachines de la Santa Cruz Norma E. Cantú

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

NORMA E. CANTÚ

It’s a brisk morning in early March 2009 in San Antonio, Texas, and the annual women’s march celebrating International Women’s Day is about to begin. We will march past the Alamo, past San Fernando Cathedral, past the hotels and businesses with early morning tourists and local patrons. The march will go from Travis Park to Milam Park—Anglo names for spaces that in the old days were called “plazas.” A young girl no older than twelve, dressed in a long brown cotton skirt and a red blouse with a red headband across her forehead, holds an eagle feather. She will do a water blessing before the march begins. Her father, who also has a red headband and is wearing a white cotton shirt and pants, beats a flat drum solemnly. The crowd of a couple of hundred people hushes solemnly and listens to her soft song. She dips the feather in water and sprinkles the ground. Some of us face the four directions as she sings her blessing prayer in a language we don’t understand. Could it be Coahuiltecan? That was how Fabiola, one of the organizers, introduced her—as a member of the Coahuiltecan nation. But pretty much all vestiges of the many dialects of that language that were spoken in South Texas for centuries are gone. Erased. Only scraps survive, mostly in old prayer books; the Christian prayers used to indoctrinate the native people paradoxically remain as testaments of the old language. As a child, I went to “la doctrina” to learn the Catholic prayers—in Spanish, of course. But I also went to see the matachines dance to the beat of the drum. In this chapter, I focus on the latter, the folk religious dance tradition of los matachines, as I interrogate the indigenous identity we as Chican@s identify and disidentify with in the particular area of South Texas.

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Medium 9780253008589

Ncaa Tournament: Indiana VS. VCU, 3-17-12 (63-61)

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

Indiana Hoosiers forward Will Sheehey (10) celebrates the Hoosier win during the Indiana Virginia Commonwealth 2012 NCAA Men’s Basketball third round game at the Rose Garden in Portland, Ore., Saturday, March 17, 2012.

By Dustin Dopirak

Will Sheehey grabbed the ball on the left baseline after Victor Oladipo’s shot was blocked and flashed an involuntary smile, because he knew.

It mattered not that the sophomore swingman was in perhaps the biggest pressure situation of his basketball career, or that the shot he was about to take could be the one that either continued Indiana’s magical 2011-12 season with a dramatic late comeback or led to its eventual end. When he gets that look, that wide open, it goes in. Every time.

“Will’s mid-range is almost automatic,” Oladipo said. “When he shot it, I knew it was going in as soon as it left his hands.”

It did, and then on the other end, Virginia Commonwealth guard Rob Brandenberg’s 3-pointer for the win hit off the front of the rim — and after hanging above it for a perceived eternity — fell over the back end to give the No. 4 Hoosiers a breathtaking 63-61 NCAA Tournament victory over the No. 12 seed Rams, a berth in the Sweet 16 and a rematch with No. 1 Kentucky.

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