219 Chapters
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Medium 9781574414615

Reflections Before Charging Ahead

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

Reflections Before
Charging Ahead

That sentence about my daddy’s influence has got me to thinking. Maybe before I go any further, I should try to figure out exactly why I’ve taken the paths I have. What were the influences that drove me toward horses and hard physical work, while at the same time driving me toward a bunch of graduate degrees? I’m pretty sure my dad had a lot to say about all this, but his influence also had some subtle aspects to it.

He started me off doing pushups probably about the time I first opened my eyes. I could pound the stuffings out of all my little friends by the time I was six months old. No one messed with me!

When I got older, Daddy didn’t push me into sports even though he had been a professional football player, a boxer, an Olympic-caliber track man, etc. He was the complete athlete and had no insecurities on that score. I felt an unspoken push toward sports, but he who always talked with a loud and dominating voice never got on my case if I didn’t excel in a sport, or even if I dropped out of one in mid-season. He was always pleased with any athletic trophies or prizes I won, but never showed any disappointment in me if I failed. In fact one time when I only got second in a company picnic contest where I usually won everything, he blamed himself. That was an unusual event where my dad had to lie down on his back in the center of a circle of kids and whirl a big hawser rope around in a circle about a foot off the ground. The rope was 20 feet long and it must have been an incredible feat for him to swing it around as each kid tried to jump the rope as it swung by. If the kid tripped, he or she was eliminated. It finally came down to just me and another kid, and neither of us seemed to be tiring. Daddy told me to take off my jacket, and as I was doing that, I tripped on the rope as it came around. Afterwards my dad said it was his fault for asking me to take off my jacket. I was surprised.

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Medium 9780253002952

9 Roland Barthes, Mojado, in Brownface: Chisme-laced Snapshots Documenting the Preposterous and Factlaced Claim That the Postmodern Was Born along the Borders of the Río Grande River William Anthony Nericcio

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

WILLIAM ANTHONY NERICCIO

The editors have asked that I add a prolegomena to the forehead or face of this essay, and I am happy to do so. Way back in the day (old skool grad school days, when this son of la frontera was kidnapped by the Ivy League and whisked away to freeze his nalgas off in Ithaca, New York), I was a big fan of Roland Barthes—I thrilled to the jouissance of the pleasures of the text, read and reread the dispatches in Mythologies, etc. etc. Long story short, I escaped the wicked pirates of Cornell, got a job at the University of Connecticut, jumped ship to Califas and SDSU and, my first year there (1991, shh shh!) I wrote an in-house grant proposal and was awarded five hundred smackeroos to purchase my first 35 mm camera. The rest, as they say, is history. What follows are the theorylaced meditations of a Chicano on crack Kodak, a Mexicameran-American (that’s me in the center there to the right of Edward James Olmos; Barthes’s there to the right of me, or at least his photoshopped ghost is); I am utterly responsible for the contents of this rasquache semiotic whatsit and beg you reward the editors of this collection for allowing it to appear in these pages.

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Medium 9780253008589

Watford’s Eyes a Window into his Game

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

By Dustin Dopirak

Kory Barnett can tell by the look in Christian Watford’s eyes. Barnett’s official title with the Indiana basketball program is senior guard, and the walk-on seldom gets on the court in that role, but his greater value is behind the scenes where he’s really a coach-in-training. He takes the temperature of the locker room before every game, looking for signs that might reveal who’s in the right frame of mind and who isn’t.

To know if the Hoosiers are going to get the Watford they want, Barnett said, he has to look closely — past the junior forward’s slow, swaggering gait and easy-like-Sunday-morning demeanor and into the places where he can tell if the fire is burning.

“Every player has his edge,” Barnett said. “Christian’s edge is not to the point where he’s in the locker room cussing, pushing guys around and getting ready. His edge is a quietness, almost a calmness, like the calmness before the storm. He sits in that locker room, and you can kind of look in his eyes, and you can tell that he’s ready a lot of the times. There’s times when he’s not. Every player has games when they’re not, but when Christian’s ready, you can tell. When he comes out and he plays, I think it overflows to the rest of the team where it brings everyone else’s edge to a whole other level.”

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Medium 9780253010285

27 Small Potatoes

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Early Friday morning Pete Gill and Roy Allen gathered the team in front of the school for the drive to Evansville. Ron Heim, who had served the team quietly, faithfully, and efficiently all year as student equipment manager, would follow in a third car with basketballs, uniforms, and other peripherals the team would need. Practice was scheduled at 10:30 AM on the Roberts Stadium floor. Following practice, they would repair to the Esquire Motel on the northern edge of the city to hole up till game time on Saturday.

Jim Roos was there as well to see them off with words of encouragement, wishing very much to be going along. It was his task, however, to stay behind and lead students and faculty through a day of regular classes when no one wanted to think of anything other than basketball. The morning mail brought to the school a bagload of letters from well-wishers around the state, including one postmarked Milan, Indiana. Jim opened it first. The brief message inside read, “To the Ireland Spuds. We did it back in 1954 and you can do it in 1963. Everybody in Milan is rooting for your team.” It was signed Cale Hudson, Milan Principal.

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Medium 9780253010285

2 No Irish in Ireland

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

In the heat of this Saturday afternoon, the first of what Betty Roos decided would be a long hot summer in purgatory if not downright hell, she knew the day would be one of those that would drag her to the end of her wits. Wrapped tightly in the crook of her left arm, her nine-month-old baby boy, Scott, wriggled inside a freshly full diaper, while in the desperate grip of her right hand, the chubby paw of Eric, her three-year-old with Down syndrome and a wickedly contrary attitude, struggled to break free. Betty was now in the process of dragging Eric furiously out of the bathroom, where he had just gotten into the storage cabinet beneath the sink and spilled Ajax in powdery streams across the tiled floor. She had found him sitting in it, with both hands caked in gritty white paste, just as he was about to lick them clean. Having narrowly averted disaster, she left the bathroom mess for later. Now, she had to let go of Eric just long enough to yank the bathroom door closed, but it was more than enough time for him to waddle away out of reach toward the living room, with a devilish giggle.

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Medium 9781574416527

Appendix I - Texas Prison Rodeo Timeline

Mitchel P. Roth University of North Texas Press ePub

Texas Prison Rodeo Timeline

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Medium 9780253008589

Indiana VS. Purdue, 3-4-12 (85-74)

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

Indiana Hoosiers guard Verdell Jones III (12) drives the baseline against Purdue Boilermakers guard Ryne Smith (24) during the Indiana Purdue men’s basketball game at Assembly Hall in Bloomington, Ind., Sunday, March 4, 2012.

By Dustin Dopirak

The last game in Assembly Hall in Indiana’s enchanted season of renewal couldn’t have ended any other way, could it? It certainly would’ve spoiled the narrative some if the Hoosiers would’ve suffered their second loss in Bloomington this year and for it to happen against their in-state rival. And it certainly wouldn’t have been quite as sweet for Indiana if the Hoosiers weren’t able to send in together in the game’s final minute their five seniors, the ones who willingly signed up to rebuild a kingdom in ruin and finally got to see it rise again in their final season.

But the Hoosiers’ 85-74 win over Purdue in front of 17,472 at Assembly Hall made sure this chapter of the story book ended the way the fairy tale writers would have it. Despite a second-half charge from the Boilermakers that was just enough to make the Hoosiers nervous, the double-digit lead in the final minute allowed Indiana to check in seniors Kory Barnett, Verdell Jones III, Daniel Moore, Tom Pritchard and Matt Roth with 22 seconds to go, as they exchanged hugs with each other and all five players who were coming off the floor to allow them their Assembly Hall swan song.

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Medium 9780253002952

23 (Re)Examining the Latin Lover: Screening Chicano/ Latino Sexualities

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

DANIEL ENRIQUE PÉREZ

Marriage? Not for me.

RAMÓN NOVARRO

Chicano/Latino males have been caricatured, stereotyped, and eroticized on the screen throughout the history of US cinema and television. In Latino Images in Film, Charles Ramírez Berg highlights the most common stereotypes for these men: bandido, gang member, buffoon, and Latin lover.1 Although several Chicana/o and Latina/o artists have created images that challenge these stereotypes, they nonetheless persist. Here, I am interested in examining the Latin lover archetype in US popular culture to demonstrate how this image has evolved over the years and how the Latin lover has always had queer characteristics. I trace the trajectory of the Latin lover, beginning with Ramón Novarro and ending with Mario López, and highlight queer aspects of his identity while also underscoring the influence he has had on male aesthetics and on facilitating non-normative discourses on gender and sexuality.

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Medium 9781574413205

Porch Hunting

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

7978-ch05.pdf

10/6/11

8:17 AM

Page 281

PORCH HUNTING by Sue Friday

I can see Grandpa, Adron Alford, sitting on the porch, reared back in his favorite hide-seat straight chair. He has on dusty field boots, frayed-at-the-hem jeans, and is bare chested because he took off his heavy denim jumper to cool off. There is a ring of sweat around his head from his hat. My sister and I, at most 3rd or 4th graders, are fighting over the swing although it is big enough for both of us.

Grandpa gives us “the look” and we settle down. For amusement all summer we either read, go to church, help with light farm work, or listen to Grandpa tell stories—always about hunting or fishing or the animals involved.

Today’s story is about an ol’ boy being chased by a wildcat.

“And that ol’ boy ran and ran until he couldn’t run anymore and fell out on the ground!” Grandpa says, “and the old cat hops up on a log . . .” and Grandpa’s hand and arm make the arc of the wildcat jumping onto the log . . . “and looks with his yellow eyes at the ol’ boy laying there, gasping for breath, and says . . . .” And here I lose the story. I can see my grandpa clearly, see from his eyes that this will be funny, can hear his voice—and then I can’t.

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Medium 9780253002952

22 The Latino Comedy Project and Border Humor in Performance

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

JENNIFER ALVAREZ DICKINSON

This is a nation of aliens, going back to the
first one: Christopher Columbus.

GEORGE LOPEZ, ALIEN NATION, 1996

In a 2007 article for the Huffington Post, Roberto Lovato calls attention to the proliferation of anti-immigrant humor in mainstream entertainment, particularly anti-Latino immigrant humor, providing several recent examples of demeaning humor: at the 2007 Emmys, Conan O’Brien showed a clip depicting his writing team as day laborers; one of Bill Maher’s August 2007 “New Rules” is a ban on fruit- and vegetable-scented shampoos, quipping, “Gee, your hair smells like a migrant worker”; and Jay Leno observes that illegal immigrants arrested for prostitution are “just doing guys American hookers will not do” (Lovato). While it may be tempting to dismiss these jokes as simply comedic gaffes, they are reflective of a larger anti-immigrant discourse that has resurfaced in recent years, what Otto Santa Ana calls an “explosion” of anti-immigrant representations in American popular culture (Santa Ana 2009). With the emergence of border vigilante groups, increased proposals for immigration legislation, the ongoing construction of a border wall, and cable news anchors regularly vilifying immigrants, it is clear that advocates for immigrant rights face significant challenges in shifting public opinion. Despite the long history and significant economic and cultural contributions of Latinos in the United States, fears of terrorism and an economic slowdown can easily reverse gains made in improving the popular images of Latinos and Latino immigrants. As Santa Ana points out in Brown Tide Rising, “human thinking, at base, is not mathematical code or logical expression. Human thought is constructed with images that represent reality” (Santa Ana 2002, xv).

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Medium 9780253014993

7. Keeping It Real: Sports Video Game Advertising and the Fan-Consumer

Thomas P Oates Indiana University Press ePub

Cory Hillman and Michael L. Butterworth

IN THE UNITED STATES, FEW, IF ANY, CULTURAL ACTIVITIES, products, or experiences are immune to the often unrestrained hands of commercialism, marketing, and advertising in the ambitious and overzealous pursuit of audiences and consumers. Sports are especially subject to these conditions, evidenced by the following examples: advertisers spent approximately $10.9 billion on national sports broadcasts between the final quarter of 2010 through September 2011; NBC paid the International Olympic Committee $2.2 billion to broadcast the 2010 and 2012 Winter and Summer Olympics; CBS and Turner Broadcasting agreed to pay nearly $11 billion to the NCAA for the rights to the annual men’s college basketball tournament. Divisional realignment in college football has also been stimulated by the desire to create “megaconferences” in the chase for lucrative television packages with major networks, and the NCAA’s decision to determine its national champion of college football’s Football Bowl Subdivision with a four-team playoff beginning in 2014 came with estimates that the tournament could be worth as much as $6 billion.1 Meanwhile, fans spent $3.2 billion on Major League Baseball (MLB) team merchandise in 2011, marking an 8.1 percent increase from the previous season, and the typical NFL fan spends approximately $60 on apparel, snacks, and other merchandise during the week of the Super Bowl.2

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Medium 9781574416527

Chapter 6 - A Sad State of Affairs (1947–1949)

Mitchel P. Roth University of North Texas Press ePub

“I guess it just takes some men longer to grow up than it does others.”

—O'Neal Browning, c. 1951

FOLLOWING the Second World War, the Texas prison population began to rise again, burgeoning to the point that it was almost impossible to guarantee the minimum standards of health and comfort set down in the MacCormick recommendations. It was doubtful standards would improve until legislative funding was directed at remedying the still appalling conditions on the prison farms. Even Governor Beauford H. Jester admitted that “Investigations may come and investigations may go, but the Texas prison system will be bad until the Legislature gives it more money.”1 In this era conditions at many of the Texas prison farms were at their modern nadir, exemplified by poor sanitation and food, dilapidated dormitories, and brutal discipline. Even as late as 1947 few buildings had screens, allowing in all kinds of legendary Texas pests, including rats, insects and other vermin. Considering the miserable conditions still dominating life in the Texas prison system it was understandable that prisoners looked forward to the October rodeo season each year.

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Medium 9781574411607

Part One Day 1

Geraldine Ellis Watson University of North Texas Press PDF

Reflections on the Neches

Part One

Day 1

LAUNCH OFF

River Mile 108 12:00 Noon

It was a glorious autumn day, the river was just right, my boat was packed with simple necessities, I was ready. My 15-year-old blind samoyed dog, Ulysses,

Jr., was also ready, and David, my son, was ready to launch us off. We were putting in at Town Bluff and I had left my VW van at Sheffield’s Ferry (Highway

1013), the takeout point. Junior and I climbed aboard my 14-foot flat-bottom riverboat, and David pushed us off into the current to begin our odyssey. Ulysses,

Jr., posed proudly like a figurehead in the prow, his ears erect to catch the sounds of all the things his poor blind eyes were missing. How joyously he had leaped into the boat when I said, “Yes, Darling, you can go!”

At this point, I should have sailed grandly and majestically off onto the river and into my great adventure, but, alas, the Corps of Engineers, who regulate the release of water at Dam B, just a few hundred yards upstream, had decided to hold the water for awhile, so there was no current. A strong wind came up and pushed my light craft backward, so there I sat, paddling furiously and going nowhere. David stayed long enough to have a good laugh and left me to the mercy of the wind and river. Finally, the wind slacked, and I made enough headway to get downstream into some current. I continued to wield the paddle with vigor, however, in order to get away from the developed areas below the dam before night fell. My heart was set on camping the first night on the big sandbar at Cowart’s Bend. Another

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Medium 9781574416527

Chapter 2 - A Cowboy's a Man with Guts and a Hoss

Mitchel P. Roth University of North Texas Press ePub

“People don't want to see a rodeo cowboy die, but they want to be there when he does.”

—Rodeo rider Jim Shoulders2

THE cowboy is arguably the most indelible and enduring image of the American West (if not the entire country). He emerged as a Western frontier hero in the nineteenth century and American popular culture has feasted on his image ever since, transforming what one folklorist called “the adventuresome horseman of the frontier into a national symbol of radical individualism.”3 Most authorities have traced the origins of the term “cowboy” back to around 1725. By the American Revolution the term cowboy had attained a more derogatory connotation, when it was used to refer to Tory guerrillas who jingled cowbells in order to lure “patriotic Americans into the brush” as an ambush strategy.4 By 1847, Mirabeau Lamar, the second president of the Republic of Texas, noted in his papers that “Anglo ‘Cow-Boys’ were marauders, thieves who had rounded up cattle between the Nueces and Colorado.”5 And still another Texas writer noted that the border “'cow driver’ was often a robber and at times a murderer.”6

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Medium 9780253002952

19 No Somos Criminales: Crossing Borders in Contemporary Latina and Latino Music Arturo J. Aldama

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

ARTURO J. ALDAMA

Anti-immigrant discourse in general and anti-Mexican hate speech and hate crimes in particular are a central piece of contemporary US political and public culture. The racist sense of entitlement by anti-immigrant xenophobes is echoed in a variety of formats including public radio, prime time news shows, and the blogosphere, and it is a central platform of many Republican senators, governors, and elected city officials such as mayors. Anti-immigrant games such as “Catch the Wetback” are the new form of political theatrics on many college campuses, and the Southern Poverty Law Center that does the Klan Watch has noted an incredible increase in hate-motivated violence toward those perceived as undocumented in the United States in the last several years.

The issues that concern me most are the arrogance of power and the absolute sense of racial entitlement that drive the supposedly fringe paramilitary nativist and neo-Nazi vigilante groups along the border and throughout the United States (which, in a loose chronology, include the Barnett Brothers, Ranch Rescue, the American Border Patrol, the Christian Identity Movement, the National Alliance, and the Minute Men) that have spread into the American mainstream. In fact, the political and public cultures of the United States carry an enormous weight of transversal racial hostility, evidenced most recently by Arizona Senate Bill 1070.1

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