296 Slices
Medium 9781574416541

12. The Development of a Golden Age

David S. Turk University of North Texas Press ePub
Medium 9781574414769

Chapter 19: Robbery of the Great Northern

Mark T. Smokov University of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER 19

Robbery of the Great Northern

On April 26, 1901, while Kid Curry and Ben Kilpatrick were making their way north, Tom Ketchum literally lost his head in a botched hanging in Clayton, New Mexico, for the crime of train robbery. Four days later, April 30, Orlando Camillo “Deaf Charley” Hanks, alias Charles Jones, was released from the state penitentiary at Deer Lodge, Montana, after serving eight years for his part in a Northern Pacific train robbery near Greycliff in late August 1893.1 He would play an important role in the Wild Bunch’s next train robbery.

Over two weeks later, on May 15, a Pinkerton wanted poster was finally issued that made use of the Fort Worth Five photo.2 It had taken what seemed an inordinate amount of time for authorities to identify the outlaws pictured. In her Pinkerton interview over six and a half months later, Lillie Davis would identify all the men in the photo by their aliases, and add some details of what she knew concerning their outlaw activities and their girlfriends.3

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Medium 9781574411829

3. Intensive Supervision Programs

Gail Caputo University of North Texas Press PDF

CHAPTER 3

Intensive Supervision Programs

BACKGROUND

Intensive Supervision Programs, the most popular intermediate sanctions in the United States, provide for closer monitoring and surveillance of offenders than is possible with regular probation and parole. An intensive supervision program (ISP) is a more enhanced and restrictive form of probation or parole intended to protect the public.

Probation departments experimented with intensive forms of probation as early as the 1950s. These early programs emphasized low caseloads to afford probation officers better control of offenders under supervision. In the late 1970s there were as many as 46 ISPs. These programs were used for offenders on probation and provided for smaller caseloads and increased officer-offender contacts (Byrne, Lurigio, &

Baird, 1989).

It was not until the mid-1980s, however, that intensive supervision programs emerged in their present forms. Like other intermediate sanctions, intensive supervision programs were created to reduce reliance on prisons and to fill the gap between traditional probation and incarceration by serving as tougher punishments with stricter controls over offenders than traditional probation could provide. The impetus behind this new generation of programs was to alleviate crowding in prisons, to more effectively supervise higher-risk offenders on probation, to save money, and to control crime (See Petersilia, 1999; Haas & Latessa,

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Chapter 6: Kid Curry Loses Another Brother

Mark T. Smokov University of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER 6

Kid Curry Loses Another Brother

About the time Kid Curry left the hideaway in the Missouri Breaks and headed for Wyoming, younger brother John Curry became involved in a water rights dispute and took up with another man’s wife, not necessarily in that order.

Little Rockies pioneer Charles W. Duvall wrote that the four Curry brothers had each homesteaded their own piece of land. “The Curry ranches extended from the east boundary of the Tressler ranch down Rock Creek which swung south, just east of the Tressler homestead. As 160 acres was all one could homestead at that time these four homesteads were only about a mile and a half long. The home which the Curry’s built and where they all lived was built near a large spring which came out of the north bank of Rock Creek and the homestead joining Dan Tressler. The Curry home was in plain sight from the Dan Tressler home.”1

Tressler was building up his ranch, and he and his pretty young wife Lucy seemed to be doing well. Then a romance developed between John Curry and Lucy Tressler. When confronted by her husband Dan, she was forced to leave.2 According to Dad Marsh, Curry wasn’t the first man with whom Lucy had been intimate.3 With marriage in mind, she moved in with Curry on a ranch on the Missouri River. Tressler remained on his ranch while he decided what to do. Becoming fed up with the situation, he sold his spread to Jim Winters in 1895, and moved to the Harlem area with his children.4 In the winter of 1895/1896 Winters’ step-brother Abraham Ditmars Gill moved from the East Coast to become a partner. Gill’s father, Dr. Charles Gill of New York City, had adopted Winters after his father was killed in action in the Civil War.5

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Medium 9781574416541

8. Facing Protest and Peril

David S. Turk University of North Texas Press ePub

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