964 Chapters
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Medium 9781609942922

Money and Happiness What’s the Connection?

Metcalf, Franz Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

What’s the Connection?

 

MANJUSHRI:

What is the root of good and evil?

VIMALAKIRTI:

Physicality is the root of good and evil.

MANJUSHRI:

What is the root of physicality?

VIMALAKIRTI:

Desire is the root of physicality.

MANJUSHRI:

What is the root of desire?

VIMALAKIRTI:

The false self is the root of desire.

MANJUSHRI:

What is the root of the false self?

VIMALAKIRTI:

Ignorance is the root of the false self.

MANJUSHRI:

What is the root of ignorance?

VIMALAKIRTI:

Emptiness.

MANJUSHRI:

What is the root of emptiness?

VIMALAKIRTI:

When something is empty, what root can it have?

 

So all things grow from an empty root.

—Vimalakirtinirdesha Sutra 7

THIS DIALOGUE BETWEEN two awakened beings brings out our real relationship with money. It evokes St. Paul’s statement in the Bible, that love of money is the root of all evil. But the Buddhist teaching goes deeper. Our desire for money goes beyond the nature of money, even beyond the nature of desire itself. It points to the nature of all things.

Manjushri, the bodhisattva of wisdom, begins with a question asked all over the world: What is the root of all evil? The great householder bodhisattva, Vimalakirti, answers right away that not greed, not money, but focus on physicality is the root. In this, the Buddha teaches something slightly different from, but not incompatible with, what Jesus taught. Money, even loving it, is not intrinsically evil. Instead, evil comes from our delusion that the physical world is fundamental. Money responds to and perpetuates this delusion that the physical will satisfy us. In a way, money is the ultimate empty thing: something appearing huge but in fact entirely hollow. It acts to entrap us in pleasures that are themselves empty. We—both individuals and organizations—keep score with money. We measure success with money, so our earnings and our economies must always grow. Yet this never-ending quest can never be fulfilled.

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Medium 9780253015990

3 Shiʿi Islam Comes to Town: A Biography of Shaykh al-Zayn

Mara A. Leichtman Indiana University Press ePub

SHAYKH ʿABDUL MUNʿAM al-Zayn is an imposing figure in his long gray robes, white turban, and gray beard. He is a charismatic man, and when he speaks, people listen.1 He demands respect not only because he is a shaykh, and the first Shiʿi Islamic leader in Senegal, but also because he is one of the few highly educated men among the Lebanese community in Dakar. Here, knowledge is something to be shared, and Shaykh al-Zayn is not a man short of words. He lectures at more than four hundred occasions a year—weekly at Friday prayer, every evening during the month of Ramadan, and twice daily during the ten days of the Shiʿi commemoration of ʿAshura. On Tuesdays and Thursdays he teaches religious classes for men, on Saturdays he teaches Qurʾan classes for women, and he speaks at memorial ceremonies and various other community events. He lectures about religion, politics, history, moral issues, and daily struggles the community might face. For example, his theme for Ramadan 2002 compared the Qurʾan, Torah, and Bible. He has encouraged the community to live life to the fullest, be unafraid of death, seek knowledge and education, and quit smoking. He has used such occasions to talk about dangers of the Internet, which contains good sites about religion, but also bad sites about sex, which children should be forbidden from accessing. He has chided the community for gossiping too much, and once gave a lecture against abortion. By chance, a woman pregnant with an unplanned child, thinking of aborting, attended the shaykh’s lecture and decided to keep the baby. Such is the power of a shaykh.

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Medium 9780253021069

7 Teaching Prophetic Politics: Ethics and Politics in Levinas’s Talmudic Lessons

Michael L. Morgan Indiana University Press ePub

Levinas’s published writings include books, collections of essays and articles, interviews, and Talmudic lessons. Generally speaking, the best places to look for Levinas’s comments on concrete and particular situations in which ethics and politics encounter one another are his many published interviews and his twenty-four published Talmudic lessons.1 In the interviews Levinas speaks directly to an interviewer and responds to his or her questions; the informality of the setting often elicits from him examples, illustrations, and textual references and comments that are very helpful for understanding the themes of his thinking. In the Talmudic lessons Levinas selected texts to discuss that were chosen precisely because they expressed themes that Levinas associated with the announced topic of the colloquium for that given year. Often—although not always—in the course of the lesson, he refers to contemporary events or widely publicized incidents that contributed to the choice of that year’s topic. Also, the texts themselves typically include stories or legal discussions concerning particular types of conduct. Hence, both the setting for these lessons and their Talmudic focus move Levinas to make comments that, relative to the bulk of his writings, are quite concrete and particular.

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Medium 9781523093984

42. Don’t Mark My Paper, Help Me Get an A

Blanchard, Ken; Broadwell, Renee Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

GARRY RIDGE

Garry Ridge and I got to know each other shortly after he had become president at WD-40 Company, when he was a student in the masters in leadership program my wife, Margie, and I cofounded at University of San Diego. Garry is one of those people who, when he has a powerful learning, begins to implement it the next day. His journey to make WD-40 Company a great servant leadership company motivated me to write a book with him entitled Helping People Win at Work. After all, one of the key aspects of servant leadership is to help people win—accomplish their goals. Garry’s story is well worth replicating in your company. —KB

AT THE AGE of forty, I decided it was time to expand my learning. Although I had long ago earned a diploma from Sydney Technical College and was serving as CEO of WD-40 Company, I wanted to confirm what I thought I knew and learn what I didn’t. So I enrolled in the Master of Science in Executive Leadership degree program at the University of San Diego, a joint venture between the university and The Ken Blanchard Companies. That’s where I met Ken and heard him talk about his philosophy, as a college professor, of giving his students the final exam at the beginning of the semester—and then throughout the course teaching them the answers—so when they got to the final exam they each would get an A.

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Medium 9780253008145

SEVEN Invoking Hijab: The Power Politics of Spaces and Employment in Nigeria • HAUWA MAHDI

Edited by Elisha P Renne Indiana University Press ePub

The fact that changes in dress styles are taking place in Nigeria reflects perhaps the normal processes of change which occur in all societies. Yet these transformations, at both the macro-national and micro levels, differ as each reflects a unique experience. In Nigeria, women’s dress has increasingly become an object of contention at the macro level, more so in the last three decades than it had in previous years. State actors and some civil society organizations (CSOs) alike have become active in the discourse of and attempts to legislate how women should or should not behave as a moral imperative. In 2007, Senator Ufot Eme Ekaette, one of only nine women in the 109-member Senate chamber of the National Assembly, gained some notoriety for her proposed bill, which in the light of Nigerians’ penchant for nicknames soon became known as the Nudity Bill (Adaramola 2008). There are other politicians who share the title of morality police with Ekaette. The senator and former governor of Zamfara State Ahmed Sani introduced the death penalty on sexual offences during his governorship, on 27 January 2000. (He later went on to enhance his moral authority by his marriage to an Egyptian girl in her early teens.) Second, some twenty-six senators (two of whom are women) sponsored the Same-Sex Bill, which prohibits sexual relations and marriage among same-sex partners in Nigeria (Obende et al. 2011). In all these morality bills female and male senators of all backgrounds have come together without a sectarian—religious or ethnic—hitch. In the last thirty years, an era of increasing economic hardship in Nigeria, women have been blamed for anything from droughts to a rise in delinquency among children. Public discourse in the media is filled with debates and arguments that support curtailing women’s rights and freedom, often in the name of religion or tradition. The “Nudity Bill” and other morality legislation must be seen in the context of the general social disorder in Nigeria and attempts by the political elite to grope for answers to unfulfilled yearnings for basic human rights and demands for “progress,” particularly in such things as the provision of electricity and running water.

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Medium 9780253002167

3 - Visible Liberalism: Liberal Protestant Taste Evangelism, 1850 and 1950

Edited by Leigh E Schmidt and Sally M Indiana University Press ePub

__________________

Liberal Protestant Taste Evangelism, 1850 and 1950

SALLY M. PROMEY

It is tempting to posit a special relationship between liberal religion and visual culture—and especially between liberal religion and fine art. Liberalism comports well with certain prospects for art; the overlap between liberal theology and art theory, and between liberal theology and aesthetics, in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is striking. Liberal religious authors, one after another, assert affinities joining art to spirituality. The particular shape of the partnership, however, is heavily dependent on the specificities of the contexts in which conversations and connections take place.

This chapter's pages consider, first and most extensively, a range of key liberal figures of mid-nineteenth-century Protestantism in terms of their commitments to the visual arts. Having examined the shape of this engagement in the several decades around 1850, my narrative turns, by way of comparison, to the mid-twentieth-century liberal Protestant taste evangelism I have explored in the past.1 The moments that catch attention here are episodes in the spiritualization of art. In each instance proponents connected, in various ways and degrees, to the institutional church advocated a sort of aesthetic spirituality, which they insisted was even more intensely available outside the church's walls than within them.

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Medium 9781523093984

22. Five Army-Tested Lessons of Servant Leadership

Blanchard, Ken; Broadwell, Renee Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

JEFFREY W. FOLEY

My father grew up in Highland Falls at the foot of West Point. However, when he graduated from high school, he decided to go to the Naval Academy in Annapolis. He retired as a rear admiral. Even though I am a Navy brat, I have a high regard for West Point graduates based on my visits to West Point as a kid. I met Brigadier General Jeff Foley, a hero of mine, through our Lead Like Jesus ministry when he volunteered to be chairman of our board of trustees. As you will learn from this essay, he learned a lot as a soldier. —KB

IN THE WORDS of General Creighton Abrams, former U.S. Army chief of staff: “Soldiers are not in the Army. Soldiers are the Army.”

To volunteer to willingly give up one’s life as a soldier for a greater cause is perhaps the most profound example of servant leadership. Soldiers join the military for a host of reasons. One major reason soldiers choose to stay is the experience they share becoming a band of brothers and sisters—that special fraternity called the profession of arms.

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Medium 9780253012876

4 Ganv: Place, Genealogy, and Bodies

Alexander Henn Indiana University Press ePub

“We’re Christians … but first of all we’re Hindus.”

—A Goan priest quoted by Somerset Maugham, 1949 (Pearson 1987: 130)

Each Goan Ganv or village constitutes a world of its own. It is regulated by an ancient organization that orders economy and redistribution, social life and hierarchies, ritual ceremonies and traditions, all of which are closely interrelated. It has a clear-cut territory that is structured in wards (vade), fields (shet), and wilderness (ran), all of which are marked by recognized boundaries guarded by tutelary beings and affirmed by rituals and processions. Myths and genealogies tell about origins, migrations, and important historical events that are also reflected in the iconographies and legends of ancestors, gods, and saints. Hindu village gods and Catholic patron saints are considered founders, members, and guardians of the village community, believed to attend its social gatherings and religious feasts and trusted to protect its territory and people. Closely identified with their respective village—carrying its name, inheriting its mythological past, marking its localities and spaces, and protecting its people’s health and safety—these local gods and saints embody rather than simply represent the village. What Valentine Daniel says about the Tamil ur, or village (1987), is also true therefore for the Goan ganv, that is, that the divine or holy marks for its ganvkār or villagers both “the sign and the substance” of the village that provides for them home, that is, spatial belonging; memory, that is, genealogical rootedness; and bodily welfare, that is, protection and healing from all sorts of natural, spiritual, and bodily dangers and illnesses.

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Medium 9781523093984

Final Comments: The Power of Love, Not the Love of Power

Blanchard, Ken; Broadwell, Renee Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

The Power of Love, Not the Love of Power

KEN BLANCHARD AND RENEE BROADWELL

IN THE FIRST chapter of this book, Ken mentioned that when he talks to companies about servant leadership they often think he’s talking about the inmates running the prison or trying to please everyone. It takes them a while to realize that servant leadership is the only way to get great relationships and results.

After reading this book, we hope you understand that reality. If you do, we hope you not only implement it where you’re planted but also spread the word to everyone who will listen. All the great companies Ken has worked with or observed realize that profit really is the applause they get for creating a motivating environment for their people so they will take good care of their customers.

Ken got a letter from a New Zealander a few years ago that summed up this philosophy. He said, “Ken, you’re in the business of teaching people the power of love rather than the love of power.”

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Medium 9780253012531

2. Locating the Pixelated Jew: A Multimodal Method for Exploring Judaism in The Shivah · Isamar Carrillo Masso and Nathan Abrams

HEIDI CAMPBELL Indiana University Press ePub

Isamar Carrillo Masso and Nathan Abrams

THE VIDEO GAME THE SHIVAH (WADJET EYE GAMES, 2006) opens with the epigraph: “A Goy [non-Jew] came up to Rabbi Moishe to ask, ‘Why do rabbis always answer with a question?’ to which Rabbi Moishe replied, ‘Why not?’ ” In a similar Talmudic style, this chapter opens with a question: “Where has the pixelated Jew gone?” In popular culture, images of the Jew have been examined over many formats – art, film, television, cartoons, comics, graphic novels, online, and so on – but to date, despite their prevalence, images of Jews in video games have yet to be fully explored. This is partly because, in general, representations of race and ethnicity in video games are relatively unexplored and thus undertheorized.1 Furthermore, given the volume of research dedicated to analyzing the Jewish contribution to American visual culture, such as film,2 it is surprising to note that comparatively little work has been done on Judaism as a distinctive set of religious practices, behaviors, beliefs, and values. As a consequence, it is possible to read entire books on these subjects that have almost no references to Judaism qua Judaism.

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Medium 9780253008541

5 Trusting The Point of View

Mark A. Tietjen Indiana University Press ePub

5 Trusting The Point of View

GARFF’S PORTRAIT OF Kierkegaard is one critical of Kierkegaard’s own moral failings, especially of his dishonesty and self-deception. However, it seems Garff’s own approach in reading Kierkegaard is not itself “morally neutral.” In this chapter I will explore further Kierkegaard’s understanding of the moral backdrop to his authorial practice, and then I will turn the focus toward the reader of Kierkegaard to ask whether the reader’s own interpretation of Kierkegaard has a moral dimension. That is, can one read a text immorally? Is there a way one ought to read a text? With these concerns in mind, I will articulate a hermeneutic of trust in contradistinction to the kind of hermeneutic of suspicion found in Fenger and Garff. To tie this objective to my larger thesis, I want to show that a reading that trusts Kierkegaard’s retrospective literature is defensible and that it consequently adds additional support to the idea of Kierkegaard’s edifying aims.

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Medium 9780253015235

5 Religion and Politics after Partition: The Ahmadi Jihad for Kashmir

Adil Hussain Khan Indiana University Press ePub

5  Religion and Politics after Partition

The Ahmadi Jihad for Kashmir

Partition and Kashmir

With the presidency of the All-India Kashmir Committee behind him, Mirza Bashir al-Din Mahmud Ahmad continued his campaign in Kashmir as head of Jama῾at-i Ahmadiyya. This involved a temporary transformation of his image to that of a less political khalīfa. Despite attempts to maintain his affiliation with the All-India Kashmir Committee, the relationship proved to be irreconcilable. Internal support from Jama῾at-i Ahmadiyya was nonetheless enough to provide Mahmud Ahmad with a sufficient platform to continue working towards Kashmir’s independence on his own. As this transition unfolded in subsequent years, Jama῾at-i Ahmadiyya began moving in a different direction from the All-India Kashmir Committee, while other changes beyond Mahmud Ahmad’s control continued to take place on the Kashmiri front. By 1939, Sheikh Abdullah had shifted the discourse away from sharp communal polemics that highlighted internal differences, towards an inclusive Kashmiri nationalist movement intended to unite the people of Kashmir. This may be illustrated by the name change of his All Jammu and Kashmir Muslim Conference to the All Jammu and Kashmir National Conference, as noted by Mridu Rai. The new platform incorporated Hindus and Sikhs, in addition to Muslims, as victims of the Dogra government’s oppression of its people and marked a new approach to both Kashmiri politics and identity.1

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Medium 9780253014696

7. To Infinity and Beyond: Cohen and Rosenzweig on Comportment toward Redemption

Edited by Michael L Morgan and Steven W Indiana University Press ePub

Benjamin Pollock

Eternity means the eternal task; the task of eternity. Heaven and earth may pass away; ethics remains.

The Messiah’s . . . coming is not an actual end, but means merely the infinity of his coming, which in turn means the infinity of development.

—Hermann Cohen

I have no idea how one should pray for something one holds beforehand to be impossible. I cannot pray that 2 × 2 should be equal to 5. . . . The eternal which we Jews mean lies not in the infinite, but rather in the “speedily, and in our days.” . . . That which only comes in eternity—doesn’t come for all eternity.

—Franz Rosenzweig

In Judaism the Messianic idea has compelled a life lived in deferment.

—Gershom Scholem

Among the handful of über-schmalzig stories about the elder Hermann Cohen that Franz Rosenzweig bequeathed to posterity, perhaps none is as famous as the story he tells of a conversation between the two regarding the future coming of the Messiah.1 “Hermann Cohen once said to me,” Rosenzweig writes, “‘I still hope to experience the advent of the messianic age.’” Rosenzweig attributes Cohen’s hope to his having been “a believer in the false messiah of the nineteenth century”—that is, ethical socialism—a movement through which, Rosenzweig surmises, Cohen imagined Christians as converting to the “‘pure monotheism’ of his Judaism.” Rosenzweig continues the story as follows: “I was startled by the force of this ‘speedily, in our days,’ and dared not say that these signs were no signs for me. Instead, I replied only that I did not believe I’d experience it. Thereupon he asked, ‘But then when do you think [it will come]?’ I hadn’t the heart not to name a number, so I said, ‘Well, only after hundreds of years.’ But he thought [I said], ‘Well, only after a hundred years,’ and cried, ‘Oh, please say fifty!’”2

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Medium 9780253002167

4 - Discovering Imageless Truths: The Bahá'í Pilgrimage of Juliet Thompson, Artist

Edited by Leigh E Schmidt and Sally M Indiana University Press ePub

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The Bahá'í Pilgrimage of Juliet Thompson, Artist

CHRISTOPHER G. WHITE

Though Juliet Thompson (1873–1957) lived in what one reporter of her time called one of the most “materialistic and sordid corners of the world,” New York City, she had spiritual dreams, intuitions, and awakenings. She had one of them when she was a young woman, probably in her late twenties, while recovering from diphtheria, an illness that almost killed her. “One evening, while I was lying in bed,” she remembered, “I heard the doctor say to mother from the next room, ‘Juliet is dying.’ When I went to sleep that night I did not expect to wake up again.” But as she slept her fortunes changed, for sometime in the night an unexpected visitor appeared in a dream, offering a healing benediction. “I had a dream and in it I saw a most wonderful-looking man. He said to me with complete assurance, ‘You will get well.’” She had no idea who this person was, but she did recover, and after her illness she told her brother that something about this experience had made her more thoughtful about spiritual things. She wondered—Were the miracles and wonders spoken of in the Bible true, and were they still happening today? Was the spirit of Christ still in the world, healing and guiding us? Somehow, it was hard to believe.1

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Medium 9780253008541

3 Communicating Capability

Mark A. Tietjen Indiana University Press ePub

3 Communicating Capability

IN CHAPTER 1 I considered Roger Poole’s claim that either one reads Kierkegaard with attentiveness to the indirect communication or one reads him earnestly, “on religious grounds,” as edifying. Kierkegaard seems to anticipate this approach to his work: “In pseudonymous books published by me the earnestness is more vigorous, particularly in those passages in which the presentation will appear to most people as nothing but jest. This, as far as I know, has not previously been understood at all” (JP, 1:301 [#656]). Later in the entry Kierkegaard gives content to the earnestness found in the pseudonymous writings: “Especially in the communication of ethical truth and partially in the communication of ethical-religious truth, the indirect method is the most rigorous form” (JP, 1:302 [#656]). Based on these and similar passages, there is good reason to be apprehensive about Poole’s phrasing of the issue: indirect communication as opposed to the serious, the religious, the edifying. Poole’s false dilemma rests on an undialectical understanding of Kierkegaard’s indirect communication and, in particular, the relationship among the pseudonyms and between Kierkegaard himself and the pseudonyms.

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