1969 Chapters
Medium 9781475819267

An Empirical Examination of Gender Stereotype From the Result of National Board Certification

Teacher Education and Practice R&L Education ePub

JIANJUN WANG, TRACY W. SMITH, AND J. STEVE OLIVER

ABSTRACT: The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards is designed to recognize accomplished teachers in the profession. Validity of National Board certification hinges on a fundamental concern whether confounding factors other than teaching performance have contributed to the certification outcome. In particular, gender stereotypic influence is examined in this study, using a large-scale national database in four subject areas. Besides confirming gender differences in the scoring outcomes, the results suggest that the outcome difference was subject specific. Male candidates outperformed their female counterparts in science despite the stereotypic view of teaching as a female occupation. However, female candidates consistently received higher scores in so-called nonmasculine subjects, such as English and social studies.

Certification by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) is an important initiative to recognize accomplished teachers across the United States. Currently, nearly 50,000 teachers have achieved National Board Certified Teacher (NBCT) status. Other professional organizations, such as the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium, are taking steps to align their accreditation processes with the National Board standards (Goldhaber, Perry, & Anthony, 2003). As a result, the state licensing systems that are designed to set minimum standards for novice teachers are using standards Similar to those of the NBPTS, which were developed to delineate what accomplished teachers should know and be able to do for advanced certification (Margolis, 2004).

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Medium 9781475811407

SPECIAL SECTION: PROFESSING EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP: EXPERIENCES FOR THE UNIVERSITY CLASSROOM, PART 2

JOURNAL OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Guest Editor: Carolyn Carr

This is the second part of a total of four special sections. The first part ran in the previous issue of the Journal of School Leadership, and parts 3 and 4 will run in the next two issues.

CAROLYN S. CARR

ABSTRACT: This article focuses on the nature of caring in the university graduate classroom. Its purpose is to show how the ethic of care can be visible and should affect what occurs in administrative preparation programs. The article begins with a review of the literature. The second part of the article describes pedagogical practices utilized in pursuit of a caring community through a culturally responsive framework encompassing an “inclusive classroom culture,” “student funds of knowledge,” and “instructional conversations,” all aimed at helping students perform beyond their current capacity while accommodating community and cultural norms. The third section presents a factually based case study that raises key issues around the cultural encounter between a professor and a bilingual/bicultural graduate education class.

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Medium 9781576336069

"I" Words: ACT Advanced Vocabulary

Ace Academics Ace Academics ePub
Medium 9781576336809

"N" Words: Praxis I Intermediate Vocabulary

Ace Academics Ace Academics ePub
Medium 9781475817423

Autobiographical Stories of Rites of Passage of Caucasian and African-American Female Doctoral Students in Educational Administration

JOURNAL OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

JOAN POLINER SHAPIRO1,*
MARGARET BRIGGS-KENNEY2
ROCHELLE W. JAMES ROBINSON3
PAMELA M. DEJARNETIE4

ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on the autobiographical stories of one Caucasian and three African-American female doctoral students during their rites of passage in departments of educational administration. A rite of passage has been defined as the student’s journey toward the completion of the dissertation. While not generalizable, the four stories offer different perspectives and experiences of nontraditional doctoral students and may provide new insights for those who advise and teach diverse graduate students.

We learn from stories. More important, we come to understand—ourselves, others and even the subjects we teach and learn. (Witherell and Noddings, 1991, p. 279)

Our stories, those of one Caucasian and three African-American female nontraditional doctoral students, during our rites of passage in departments of educational administration, are told and discussed herein. For the purposes of this article, we created a stipulative definition for a rite of passage that includes a student’s journey through the doctoral process to the period immediately following the completion of the dissertation. We also created a category called nontraditional doctoral students, containing those who are dissimilar from the majority because of their gender, race, social class, age, or other variables of difference.

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