163 Chapters
Medium 9781574413083

Chapter 3 • Law Enforcement

R. Scott Harnsberger University of North Texas Press PDF

44  •  A Guide to Sources of Texas Criminal Justice Statistics

Agricultural Crime

095 Special Ranger Statistical Information. Fort Worth, Tex.: Texas and

Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association [annual].

The Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association (TSCRA) is a

130-year-old trade organization whose 14,500 members manage approximately

5.4 million cattle on 70.3 million acres of range and pasture land, primarily in

Texas and Oklahoma. The TSCRA employs twenty-nine investigators, who are commissioned as Special Rangers by the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation or the Texas Department of Public Safety (Tex. Code Crim. Proc. Ann. art.

2.125 (Vernon Supp. 2010)). This report provides statistics by calendar year on the number of cases investigated that involved cattle and livestock related theft.

The dispositions of those cases brought to trial are also reported (sentences, court costs assessed, fines assessed, and restitution made). In addition, property recovered or accounted for by the Special Rangers is reported as follows: number and value of steers and bulls, cows and heifers, calves, yearlings, horses, trailers, saddles, and miscellaneous ranch property.

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Medium 9781574414325

Chapter 15 – Substance Abuse

Jorge Antonio Renaud The University of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER FIFTEEN

substance abuse

This will be a short chapter. The inescapable truth is that there exists no meaningful substance abuse treatment program for the great majority of Texas convicts. Regrettably, this seems to be the direct result of public opinion. In 1990, newly elected Governor Ann Richards promised a new era in the way Texas would approach its exploding prison population. Recognizing that much of crime in Texas was committed by men and women either under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or stealing to amass the money to buy drugs or alcohol, Richards proposed setting aside tens of thousands of prison beds to house substance abusers.

There would be entire units devoted to rehabilitating addicts—therapeutic communities where perimeter security would be enhanced by convict serenity; where counselors would attempt the radical notion of fighting crime by preventing it, instilling hope and self-esteem into addicts who until then had known only the dreary treadmill of jail, dope, and crime.

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Medium 9781574411638

Parrott

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Parrott

Robert Parker Parrott was both the most successful and the most controversial designer and founder of rifled cannon and projectiles of the Civil War. His West Point Foundry was located in Cold Spring, New York, across the Hudson River from the United States Military

Academy at West Point. During the war, Parrott and the West Point Foundry produced over 3,100 cannon, twice as many as the combined cannon production of all Confederate foundries and 33 percent more than any other Union foundry.1 Parrott also produced more rifled projectiles for the Union military forces than any other foundry.

Parrott got a head start in producing rifled cannon and projectiles because of his experimental work in the late 1850s. Parrott worked on rifled cannon designs in cooperation with Dr. John Read of Alabama, who worked on projectile designs.2 By 1861 they had already worked out many of the practical problems of integrated rifle-projectile design for field caliber artillery.

Parrott was already selling field caliber rifles to individual states before the war began.3

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Medium 9781574413083

Chapter 1 • Starting Points

R. Scott Harnsberger University of North Texas Press PDF

Basic Resources

•001 Crime in Texas. Austin: Uniform Crime Reporting Section, Crime Information Bureau, Crime Records Service, Texas Department of Public Safety

[annual, 1976–date].

[full report]

[summary report]

The State of Texas officially adopted the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR)

Program on January 1, 1976. The Texas Department of Public Safety has the responsibility for collecting, validating, and tabulating UCR data received from over 1,000 law enforcement agencies in the state. Each annual report is organized as follows:

Chapter 1: The UCR Program;

Chapter 2: Texas Crime Analysis (including the Texas Crime Clock);

Chapter 3: Index Crime Analysis (murder, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson);

Chapter 4: Selected Non-Index Crimes (DUI arrests, drug abuse arrests, drug seizures, and weapons arrests);

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Medium 9781574411638

Grape Stands and Quilted Grape

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Grape Stands and Quilted Grape

For both smoothbore and rifled artillery, grape stands and quilted grape served a different purpose from case shot and canister. Quilted grape and grape stands were designed to damage ships’ rigging and spars or fortification equipment, with the fragments from this damage causing major casualties to gun crews.

Some confusion exists about the use of grape stands and quilted grape. As general antipersonnel weapons, grape stands and quilted grape in field calibers had been largely replaced by canister by the time the war began. It appears that early in the war grape stands replaced quilted grape for calibers below 8 inch. Quilted grape were used in all calibers above 8 inches, including the 15-inch size, which has been documented aboard

Monitor-type gunboats1 and in postwar Bannerman catalogs.2 However, the Confederates captured a large supply of 32-pounder quilted grape when the Southern states seceded and had others manufactured during the early years of the war. These were deployed to river and coastal gun positions. A number of these 32-pounder quilted grape were excavated near Fort Huger, North Carolina, some years ago, and others reportedly were recovered in gun positions along the Mississippi and elsewhere over the years.

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