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Medium 9781574411638

Guide to Using Data Sheets

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Guide to Using Data Sheets

For the convenience of users, the data sheets for projectiles and torpedoes use a standard format. Descriptions of the information in each category are provided below.

Users should read this guide before using the data sheets.

Projectile Photos

Most projectile data sheets have photographs of the side, top, and bottom of the projectile. The ruler scale applies only to the side view of the projectile. It is important to note that the scale does not include the height of the fuze, only the length of the projectile.

The torpedo data sheets normally have only a side view and a close-up photo of the fuze or detonator mechanism. Most torpedo data sheets do not include a scale bar, because the torpedoes are too long for the scale numbers to be legible.

Projectile or Torpedo Identification Title

The projectile identification provides several key pieces of information. It first identifies the origin of the projectile or torpedo. Origin defines who manufactured the projectile or torpedo: CS, British/CS, or US. Next it identifies the caliber (e.g., bore size) of the cannon that fires the projectile.

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Shot, Shell, and Case Shot

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Section 1

Large Smoothbore Projectiles

Shot, Shell, and Case Shot

Smoothbore projectiles are generally classified in six categories, according to their design and proposed use. Shot, shell, and case shot are discussed in this section. Canister, grape stands and quilted grape will be discussed in the sections that follow.

Characteristics

Shot—are usually spherical in shape. These projectiles were designed to crush the target by the momentum of impact. As ships and fortifications became more formidable in their defenses, shot became more important projectiles for damaging or destroying them. Some shot were elongated, to increase the weight of the projectile being fired.

Almost all of these were proof shot, fired to ensure the ability of the cannon to withstand the pressures of firing. A few (almost all Confederate) were elongated and designed for use at very short ranges against ironclad targets before the shot started to tumble. Maury and Brooke shot are the best known of this type. (Maury shot are covered in the rifled projectile section because of their traditional association with rifled projectiles.) Bar and chain shot were not used in large caliber guns.

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Medium 9781574414325

Appendix E – Recreation Requirements

Jorge Antonio Renaud The University of North Texas Press ePub

APPENDIX E

Recreation Requirements

Following are the minimum hours of recreation to be given each inmate, as agreed to under Ruiz. Units may offer more but not less. For these purposes, dayroom time is counted as recreation (rec) time. (In mid-2001, staffing shortages were serving as an excuse for certain units to begin scaling back these requirements.)

G1, G2, and G3 Minimum—Four hours weekday, one of which must be in a gym or outside rec yard. Seven hours weekend, two of which must be in a gym or outside rec yard

G 4 Medium—Four hours weekday, one of which must be in a gym or outside rec yard. Five hours weekend, two of which must be in a gym or outside rec yard

G 5 Close—Two hours daily, outside rec only

Administrative segregation:

Level I—One hour out-of-cell rec each day, with at least two hours weekly outside; Or two hours out-of-cell rec five days per week, with two hour weekly outside; Or three hours out-of-cell four days per week, with three hours weekly outside. (The Level I schedule will be decided upon by the warden or his/her designee.)

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2 Myths about Baby Birds

Andrea Dawn Lopez University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter Two

for almost an hour and she hasn’t moved!”

The bird’s baby had just died. The woman called the wildlife hotline to see what she should do.

The death came about after a long series of mistakes on this woman’s part. The mother bird had built a nest right above the woman’s doorway, but she was afraid all the commotion would be too dangerous for the mother and her baby. She was afraid that opening and shutting the door could cause the nest to fall.

In an effort to make sure the baby bird wouldn’t be injured, she took the nest and baby inside her home and called the wildlife hotline.

She didn’t know what to do and she needed advice.

The first problem was, however, that she waited about two hours before calling the hotline. Parent birds feed their babies as often as every 15 minutes from dusk until dawn. After two hours, the little bird was becoming weak from no food.

The woman was told to put the nest and the bird back outside immediately so that the parent bird could continue to care for the baby. She was told that her human scent wouldn’t cause the bird to abandon the little one. That’s a common myth.

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Chapter 1 – Diagnostic

Jorge Antonio Renaud The University of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER ONE

diagnostic

Since October 1, 1849, when a horse thief became the first person to be held in the state’s custody instead of by local law enforcement, Huntsville has been synonymous with Texas prisons. The beautiful town of Huntsville—nestled in the midst of the state’s most lovely forests; four votes from being state capital instead of Austin; adopted home of General Sam Houston—is, nonetheless, by virtue of that first prison, fated to always be linked with prisons in the minds of Texans. That unit, built in what would soon be downtown Huntsville and known as the Walls, also soon included the growing system’s administrative offices. Over a century later, as the system began to expand rapidly, it became obvious that a separate unit was needed as a processing center. The Diagnostic Unit, built in 1964 a few thousand yards from the original Walls, became that intake unit. While there are now other units that may also serve some of the functions as the Diagnostic Unit, (now called the Byrd Unit), it was the first, it remains the most thorough, and it is the one I will use as a model.

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