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Medium 9781574414325

Chapter 13 – Law Libraries/Libraries

Jorge Antonio Renaud The University of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

general and law libraries

All TDCJ units provide inmates access to both a general library and to a legal library. However, access to the general library is considered a privilege that can be revoked for disciplinary infractions. On the other hand, every inmate in TDCJ—whether in solitary confinement, in the lowest levels of administrative segregation, or in transit—will be able to either visit the legal, or law, library or have legal materials brought to him. The courts have held that TDCJ cannot deny any meaningful access to the courts, and the system, in my opinion, has done a decent job of fulfilling that mandate.

While access to the legal libraries is pretty uniform throughout the system, there is a wide gap between what access is allowed by the different units to their general libraries. The libraries are attached to the unit educational departments and are usually supervised by librarians with free-world training and staffed by TDCJ officers with a few convict clerks to perform the checking in and out of books, updating card catalogues, etc. Access to the library itself is dictated by security. As security on the different units is dictated by the attitude of the wardens and higher-ranking officers, one unit may be more accommodating of inmates who desire to use the library, while others may consider it an unnecessary privilege and a security headache. So, one unit may offer each inmate two hours weekly in the library, while another may leave the library open all evening to any inmate who is otherwise unoccupied. One unit may call inmates from separate living quarters on a sporadic basis, or only call thirty inmates at a time, and then allow them to stay only fifteen minutes at a time, hardly enough time to browse, much less read a newspaper or magazine.

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Medium 9781603446938

1. Introduction

Rudolph A. Rosen Texas A&M University Press ePub

Standing near the former president of the United States was a tall, handsome African dressed in a blaze of traditional Maasai red. Barely 20 years old, the young man was the son of a chief and in time would become a chief in his African homeland. But he was not with the former president because of politics or tribal status. He was a student whose education was being funded at a leading university in South Africa by members of the audience. He was among the “motivational elements” assembled at this international nonprofit organization’s premier fundraising event where more than 15,000 members had assembled for four days of fun and fundraising.

At one of the event’s several formal dinners, to be followed by a major auction, members heard the young African speak of his dedication to the cause of wildlife conservation. They listened intently as he told of his commitment to take what he had learned from members of the organization during his visit and go back to his country to use his new knowledge as a leader. The members were enthusiastic and renewed their commitment to fund education of young Africans at African universities.

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Appendix G – Parole Officials/Offices

Jorge Antonio Renaud The University of North Texas Press ePub

APPENDIX G

Parole Officials

There are two distinct entities that concern themselves with parole in Texas—the Parole Division of the TDCJ and the Board of Pardons and Paroles. The first agency actually oversees inmates who have been released. Ex-cons report to them, and it is their staffers who visit homes and ensure that the provisions of parole (set by the Board) are actually met. The second is an independent agency whose primary role is the discretionary release of inmates from prison, along with revocation of released prisoners.

You may reach the Parole Division at:

TDCJ-ID Parole Division

8610 Shoal Creek Blvd.

P.O. Box 13401, Capitol Station

Austin, TX 78711

(512) 406-5200

FAX (512) 406-5858

The members of the Board of Pardons and Paroles are appointed by the governor to six-year terms, which are staggered so all do not expire at the same time. You may write or call the Board members, or the chairman, at the following addresses:

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Medium 9781574411638

Sawyer

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Sawyer

Sylvanus Sawyer and his brother Addison M. Sawyer developed and patented a system of rifles, projectiles, and fuzes that were highly regarded early in the war. They had a 5.86inch rifle and projectiles under test at Fort Monroe in Hampton Roads in 1859.1 It may have been the same rifle that in 1861 earned Sawyer that high regard. Sawyer’s rifle was the only cannon available to the Union Army that could hit the Confederate batteries defending

Hampton Roads from the Rip Raps, an island about 2,000 yards south of Fort Monroe.2

Three Sawyer shell designs are known. The most common is the flanged model.

Instead of a sabot, the iron shell body has six flanges and is covered completely with a lead sleeve. A second design has the lead sleeve cover only the flanged cylindrical sides of the shell body but not the base or ogive. The third design has a smooth sided shell body completely encased in lead. There are no known battlefield recoveries of this model in large calibers. All three designs are reported to have had a brass foil over the lead sheath to reduce the lead fouling the rifling. One flanged specimen has been documented in the West Point Museum collection with this brass foil largely intact.

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Medium 9781574413083

Appendix • Data Archives and Repositories

R. Scott Harnsberger University of North Texas Press PDF

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Annual Survey Data:

Survey Data and Documentation. Atlanta, Ga.: Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health

Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of

Health and Human Services.

CDC WONDER [Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research]. Atlanta, Ga.: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of

Health and Human Services.

Compendium of National Juvenile Justice Data Sets. Washington, D.C.: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

Consolidated Federal Funds Report. Washington, D.C.: Governments Division, U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce.

Data Analysis Tools. Washington, D.C.: Bureau of Justice Statistics, Office of

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Medium 9781574414455

Chapter 7: Cattle Brand Inspectors

Lorie Rubenser and Gloria Priddy University of North Texas Press ePub

Chapter 7

Cattle Brand Inspectors

Introduction

Societies as far back as the ancient Egyptians practiced the branding of animals.1 The brand is essentially a label denoting ownership, rather like a serial number on a laptop.

An array of laws and rules developed around the branding of animals to ensure proper branding, use of different brands by different people, transfer of ownership for a branded animal, etc. Regulating and enforcing these laws now falls to the Cattle Brand Inspectors, licensed peace officers with expertise in livestock.

History of the Position

A brand registry became the most convenient way of ensuring each person, ranch, or company used a separate brand. In the United States, the earliest brand registry still in existence is from Richmond County, St. George, Staten Island, New York. The registry includes brands, court cases, road surveys, and other municipal information. Although the earliest brands in this registry are not dated, they appear to come from 1678.2

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Medium 9781574413083

Chapter 5 • Adult Corrections, Parole, and Probation

R. Scott Harnsberger University of North Texas Press PDF

Aliens

225A Justice for Immigration’s Hidden Population: Protecting the Rights of

Persons with Mental Disabilities in the Immigration Court and Detention System. Austin: Texas Appleseed, 2010.

Provides data on immigrants in Texas with mental disabilities who are held in U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention facilities, including the number of psychotropic prescriptions issued, percentage of detainee cases without counsel, detention facilities with the highest percentage of unrepresented detainees, and the number of cases adjourned because the

Department of Homeland Security requested a certification of the detainee’s mental competency.

226 Salant, Tanis J. Undocumented Immigrants in U.S.–Mexico Border Counties: The Costs of Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Services. Tucson:

Eller College of Management, School of Public Administration and Policy,

University of Arizona, 2008. NCJ 223285

Provides a breakdown of the costs of undocumented immigrants to law enforcement and criminal justice services in the U.S. counties bordering Mexico, which includes fifteen in Texas. County-level statistics are given for sheriff’s offices, detention facilities, adult probation, and juvenile probation.

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Medium 9780253012111

2. Mapping the SS Concentration Camps

Indiana University Press ePub

Anne Kelly Knowles, and Paul B. Jaskot, with Benjamin Perry Blackshear, Michael De Groot, and Alexander Yule

CONCENTRATION CAMPS ARE AMONG THE MOST familiar and haunting places of the Holocaust. Two perspectives have come to dominate our view of the camps. The most powerful and most meaningful for many people is the perspective of victims, which is expressed so movingly in published memoirs, such as Elie Wiesel’s Night and Primo Levi’s If This Is a Man,1 and in thousands of survivor interviews and oral histories. These testimonies naturally refer chiefly to the parts of concentrations camps where victims were allowed or forced to go: the train ramp where they were offloaded, the barracks, the roll-call plaza, the hospital, kitchen, latrines, and the places where inmates were punished or put to death. Reinforced by the stunning photographs taken by Allied forces as they liberated camps such as Bergen-Belsen and by scores of documentaries and feature films about victims’ experiences,2 the spaces where prisoners suffered have come to represent the camps in popular imagination, to the point of becoming visual tropes, along with iconic objects such as barbed wire and crowded wooden bunks.3

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Medium 9781574411638

Glossary

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Glossary

ANCHORED TORPEDO—a torpedo (mine) designed to float under the water or rest on the bottom of a body of water, anchored in place by a weight, cables, or ropes. A defensive weapon.

ARMY OFFICIAL RECORDS (“Army ORs” in footnotes)—officially named, War of the

Rebellion Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. A 128-volume set, published from 1880 to 1901, containing original reports and other documents prepared during the Civil War by government and military officials on both sides relating to

Union and Confederate Army actions. (See Bibliography)

ARTIFACT—a man-made object, usually associated with a period, as in Civil War artifact.

BANNERMAN’S—the major military surplus dealer who purchased huge quantities of leftover military ordnance after the Civil War, which they resold well into the twentieth century. Originally known as Francis S. Bannerman’s, later known as Bannerman and Sons.

BASE—the bottom of a projectile or torpedo.

BASE PLATE—a flat iron disk on the bottom of a canister, grape stand, or quilted grape.

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Medium 9781574414455

Chapter 2: Becoming a Texas Peace Officer

Lorie Rubenser and Gloria Priddy University of North Texas Press ePub

Chapter 2

Becoming a Texas Peace Officer

Although great variety exists in Texas law enforcement positions and duties, every peace officer in the state, regardless of position, must meet the same initial requirements. Each officer starts out on the same basic footing and then begins their unique adventure in the world of law enforcement.

Qualifying as a Peace Officer in the State of Texas

In the state of Texas, all peace officers and reserves must hold a license through the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education (TCLEOSE). Created by the 59th Texas Legislature on September 1, 1965, TCLEOSE ensures peace officers across the state of Texas are able to meet the demands of a law enforcement career.1

Beyond just issuing licenses to peace officers, TCLEOSE now sets eligibility standards, develops training curriculum for academies and continuing education providers, and enforces standards for peace officers, academies, and other associated professionals. TCLEOSE also processes license revocations and training and employment records.2

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Medium 9781574414455

Chapter 9: Fire Marshal

Lorie Rubenser and Gloria Priddy University of North Texas Press ePub

Chapter 9

Fire Marshal

Introduction

Fire can leave significant damage in its wake, including property damage, environmental devastation, and even death. There are many causes of fires including accidents, weather-related causes like lightning, faulty wiring, etc. When a fire is set deliberately or occurs due to negligence, police treat it as a crime of arson. Arson is the second leading cause of death in residential fires and is responsible for 500 deaths every year nationwide. Property damage from arson is estimated to cost $900 million each year.1

Arson has always been a crime, but in 1978 it was elevated to the status of Index Crime. In 1982 Congress passed the Anti-Arson Act, which made the crime of arson a permanent part of the Uniform Crime Reports Part I offenses.2 Basically, this piece of legislation reaffirmed that arson is worthy of being an Index Crime.

Other crimes may also fit within the definition of fire-related. These include insurance fraud and crimes where a fire is set to cover up another crime. The most common reason for arson is in fact financial difficulties.3 Homicide and burglaries are also crimes that frequently relate to fires.4

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Medium 9781574411546

5 Leave Bambi in the Forest

Andrea Dawn Lopez University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter Five

He was sure the fawn was abandoned. The man was working with a construction crew, clearing undeveloped wildlands to prepare the area for a large office building that was going to be built. One evening as he was leaving work, he noticed a fawn wandering around and looking disoriented. The little guy was at the edge of the field they had just cleared. The man guessed that the bulldozers had disrupted the fawn and scared off the mother. He was probably right.

The man knew already to leave the fawn alone in the area where he found him. He knew that the mother may be nearby, ready to return for the fawn at any time. He left the fawn there overnight. But the next day, the man found the fawn in the same spot, still wandering around and looking disoriented.

The fawn looked weaker than he had the previous evening. The mother was nowhere in sight. The man continued to work throughout the day, all the while keeping an eye on this little guy. When it was time to go home that evening, the man picked up the fawn and brought him home.

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6 Lions and Tigers and Bears

Andrea Dawn Lopez University of North Texas Press PDF

Lions and Tigers and Bears

the old mining town called Buckskin Joe. It recaptures the spirit of the Old West in an actual frontier setting with 30 buildings that are original structures from ghost towns in the Rocky Mountain region.

People come to learn about Colorado’s history, as well as experience things like gunfights, hangings, and magic shows. Some of the entertainment is based on real events that happened in the 1800s.

Perhaps one event that the park didn’t bank on having was an act by a guest who wasn’t on the entertainment line-up. That guest was a black bear.

The bear had been frequenting the park in search of food. Wildlife officers say that food is the main reason a bear will initially come around and stay around. The park offered plenty of leftover snacks from all of its tourists.

The bear was causing trouble, however. He was getting into trash and searching the rest of the park for a meal or two. The Colorado

Division of Wildlife stepped in after the bear had come around one too many times and set a trap. The bear found himself in that trap soon afterwards.

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Britten

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Britten

Sir Bashley Britten designed a lead-cupped rifled projectile and received a British patent on it in August 1855.1 Britten was unable to get an American patent on his projectile design until after the war. Some experts suspect that the U.S. Government’s anti-British sentiment caused this delay.

It may also be due to efforts by Alexander Dyer, a senior officer and eventually the

Chief of the Union Army Ordnance Department. After a trip to England just before the war, Dyer designed a very similar shell, which the Union Army Ordnance Department purchased in large numbers, even though most large caliber Dyer shells failed to explode.

It is noteworthy that Britten was allowed a U.S. patent on his design after the war, when his design was considered obsolete. It is also noteworthy that Dyer never obtained a patent on his design.

Britten’s design (and Dyer’s) had a lead cup sabot that was bonded onto the iron shell body with a hot zinc coating. The base of the shell body is rounded and often shows through the bottom of the sabot.

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Chapter 22 – Emergencies

Jorge Antonio Renaud The University of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO

what to do in emergencies

This topic was the birthing idea for this book. In January of 1993, my brother fell ill and my family was not only unsure how to contact me—they did not know the procedure to follow so that I might attend his funeral after he died. This hurt my family and myself deeply, that I could not be there to receive and give comfort. The Texas prison system places many conditions on this type of furlough, but it is allowed. But in such a situation, time is of the essence. If you want to get your relative out in time to see his dying mother, or to attend a memorial service for his daughter, then you must follow TDCJ guidelines, especially the guidelines that specify the people authorized to contact TDCJ with the details of a situation.

For TDCJ officials, this is an issue loaded with problems. Most state officials are sincerely sorry when tragedy befalls the family members of convicts and they do not want to seem heartless. However, security is a priority, and the system cannot allow just anyone to call and say, “John Doe’s mom is dying, can you let him come and see her? She’s his only relative.” While his mother may in fact be dying, and while she may in fact be his only relative, the state must have the paperwork to document her illness from a reputable physician in case the inmate is furloughed and something goes wrong during the furlough. He can commit a crime, try to escape, get into a violent episode during the ceremony, or be involved in any of a number of incidents that will reflect poorly on everyone involved.

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