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Medium 9781442229037

THE TRIUNE GOD AND THE PASSION OF CHRIST

Pro Ecclesia Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Gabriel Fackre

It has long been held that Jesus Christ in his human nature underwent the humiliation that happened on the road to Calvary and on the cross. Did the divine nature—Jesus as God—in some profound sense also participate in the back that was bloodied, the hands that were pierced, the cry of dereliction, and the death that Jesus died?

Mel Gibson’s film The Passion of the Christ is a study in this subject. Of course, it focuses on the suffering of the humanity of Christ. What else can a visualization of the passion do than show the human visibilities? And the portrayal of that follows the producer’s own spirituality: the “five sorrowful mysteries” of the rosary—“the agony of the Lord in the garden, his scourging, his crowning with thorns, the carrying of the cross to Calvary, the crucifixion”1 (Matt. 26:36–46, 27:26, 27:29, 27:31–32, 27:33–50), with their backdrop in the stations of the cross. Also formative of the film are the visions of the Venerables Mary of Agreda (1620–65) and Anne Catherine Emmerich (1774–82), the latter manifesting the stigmata.2 But there is more here than meets the eye. I want to explore a small hint in the film that pushes the passion to its deepest point—into the very heart of God.

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Medium 9781576336441

Level 1: Grade School_E-G: GED Words Commonly Confused

Ace Academics Ace Academics ePub
Medium 9781475824018

Growing PreK–12 Educators Through a Partnership of School Districts and a Regional University

Relations, Journal of School Public Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

BRENDA A. RUSSELL
JEFFREY L. KIRK
BOBBIE J. EDDINS
L. ANN FARRIS

ABSTRACT: In central Texas and regions across the country, community leaders are calling for university–community engagement, including development of structures for community-based research and service learning. Including the community in decision making regarding continuing professional education serves as a link between universities such as Texas A&M University–Central Texas and the needs of the communities they serve. Together, they build on each other’s strengths, provide opportunities for research agendas, and address needs critical to regional well-being. The College of Education’s process to develop a pilot continuing professional education program was based on input from those whom it serves: central Texas school districts.

The purpose of this article is to share the work of Texas A&M University–Central Texas (A&M–Central Texas) with school district partners to develop an anchoring role in offering a regional continuing professional education (CPE) program. This includes a review of the literature regarding the components and best practices of CPE, a review of initial proposed steps for program implementation, and a report of the progress.

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Medium 9781576336045

ACT Exam Essential Vocabulary: "G" Words

Ace Academics Ace Academics ePub
Medium 9781475816471

The Effects of Teachers’ Attitudes Toward Classroom Management

International Journal of Educational Ref Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Mualla Bilgin Aksu and Caglar Caglar

The rapid changes of this time urge organizations to adapt themselves as quickly as possible to respond to the needs and expectations of their clients and to survive their competition in a challenging environment. Schools are the places where the pupils should be educated according to the demands of the 21st century. However, the literature on organization management has revealed that almost every improvement in the management field has flourished in the business world and has been transmitted into the educational setting. This situation makes one think that the educational organizations are not always convenient for and open to change and improvement. The reason for this may stem from several possibilities, such as the cultural and academic orientation of the school staff and personnel, governmental decision making, and the like. According to Bonstingl (1992), schools must invest resources into training educators because outside experts cannot and should not do the work of transformation, instead of the people inside.

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Medium 9781576336977

"P" Words: SSAT-ISEE Essential Vocabulary

Ace Academics Ace Academics ePub
Medium 9781475816204

Departments

International Journal of Educational Ref Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Emily Hicks and Peter McLaren

Emily Hicks is an educator, cultural critic, and artist based in the U.S.-Mexico border region. Her undergraduate education included studies at the San Francisco Art Institute and UC Berkeley. She received her Ph.D. from UC San Diego, where she was a member a study group on aesthetics led by Herbert Marcuse. In 1984, in conjunction with the Olympics in Los Angeles, she codirected “The Peoples of Los Angeles,” an exhibit of holo-graphic portraits.

Hicks has been a member of the political art collectives BAW/TAF (Border Art Workshop/Taller de arte fronterizo) and Las Comadres. She has lectured and performed at many universities and cultural institutions in the United States, Mexico, Uruguay, Canada, Italy, Germany, Hungary, and Finland. Her work has been reviewed in Artweek, New Art Examiner, Arforum and Art in America.

She is an associate professor with a joint appointment in English and comparative literature and Chicana and Chicano studies, and has also taught at UC Irvine, USC, and the Universidad Autonoma de Baja California in Tijuana, Mexico. She participated in the K–12 Curriculum Project as an American Council of Learned Societies grant recipient (1992–95).

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Medium 9781475819397

Critical Democracy in Teacher Education

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

CHRISTOPHER B. CROWLEY

MICHAEL W. APPLE

Underpinning many of the ongoing debates over the means and ends of teacher education are serious differences about the purposes of education in general and about the relationship between schooling and a democratic society in particular. We should not be surprised that these discussions often get heated; it has long been recognized that the processes of teaching and schooling are inherently political. At stake in these debates is the nature of what counts as democracy, a word with multiple political meanings. In essence, we can distinguish what might be called thin versus thick democracy, with the former usually being based on commitments to the private good and to choice on a market and with the latter often seen as being more fully participatory and collective (Apple, 2006). The priorities that we as teacher educators assign in our preparation and guidance of teachers for their work in a society riven with growing inequalities largely depend on where we stand on the thin–thick distinction.

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Medium 9781475819359

A Call for Civic Action: Teacher Education on the Edge of Reform

R&L Education ePub

JENNIFER WADDELL

ABSTRACT : The percentage of urban teachers who leave the profession within the first 5 years is more than 50%; inadequate preparation is often cited as a cause of urban teacher attrition. This article explores a qualitative study regarding teachers’ perceptions of their experience of and preparation for teaching in urban schools. Data from teachers in urban schools were collected through interviews, observations, written documents, and focus groups and analyzed by inductive analysis. The voices of urban teachers are contrasted with and compared to current research and recommendations regarding teacher education. In sum, this article calls for teacher preparation programs across the United States to redesign curriculum to better prepare teachers for urban schools.

The U.S. Department of Education (2000) asserts that the quality of teaching is the most important factor for improving schools. However, teacher turnover and the constant hiring of new teachers can impede this improvement. On average, 12% of 1st-year teachers change schools or leave the profession. Nationally, public schools experience a 30% to 50% teacher turnover rate for beginning teachers within the first 5 years (Ballinger, 2000; Halford, 1999; Ingersoll, 2002; Ingersoll & Smith, 2003; National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future, 2002; Prince, 2002). This teacher attrition is most prevalent in low-income communities (National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future, 2002, 2003). Nationwide, the 5-year attrition rate in urban districts is more than 50% (Nieto, 2003a; Prince, 2002; Sachs, 2004; Saffold, 2003; Voke, 2003). Furthermore, reports indicate that 75% to 100% of teachers who leave are considered effective or highly effective (Voke, 2003; Wong, 2003).

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Medium 9781475819359

The Matter of Globalization: Teacher Education in Volatile Times

R&L Education ePub

KENNETH TEITELBAUM

Thirty years ago, Maxine Greene (1978) wrote about mystification as it relates to teacher education during unquiet times. Emphasizing the ways in which industrial civilization tends to obscure the socially constructed nature of what we experience—including our sense of alienation and malaise, cynicism, and betrayal—she urged teacher educators to pursue “an interrogation of surface reality,” a heightened critique of what seems “natural,” and a renewed “wide-awakeness” and embrace of “authentic speaking” (pp. 54–55). Teachers have an important role to play with students in counteracting this mystification, and teacher education programs “ought to work to combat the sense of ineffectuality and powerlessness that comes when persons feel themselves to be the victims of forces wholly beyond their control, in fact beyond any human control” (p. 64).

This is no longer the industrial age; we are well beyond the economic stagnation that existed in the 1970s, and to say that these are “unquiet times” would be to seriously downplay the transitions of the 21st century. Globalization, seen from above and below (Singh, Kenway, & Apple, 2005), is transforming nation-states and local communities. The most recent financial crisis has made clear what most everyone already knew—that economies are increasingly interlocked and competitive and jobs that seem to be taking place in one country can actually exist, rather easily and more cheaply, elsewhere. Climates are so intertwined that the effects of environmental despoliation in one area can have literally rippling effects across the globe. The traditional boundaries between academic disciplines are being challenged by a host of vexing issues (e.g., infectious disease, security, poverty, energy, and global warming) that demand multidisciplinary approaches to problem solving. Technologies and media are ubiquitous, having the effect of bringing the peoples of the world closer together on a daily basis while providing increased opportunities for privatized (and transnational corporate) ventures. We are witnessing an unprecedented worldwide flow of immigration, in essence moving in all directions at once. Differing cultural practices come into contact in ways never dreamed before—whether the tourism of food, music, and the like or the more deeply embedded differing ways of thinking and speaking about and experiencing the world. Democratization and modernization are confronting fundamentalism and traditionalism with contentious results not only in the so-called underdeveloped or developing world but right at our doorsteps.

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Medium 9781576336441

Level 1: Grade School_H-K: GED Words Commonly Confused

Ace Academics Ace Academics ePub
Medium 9781576336564

Level 2: High School_E-G: GRE Words Commonly Confused

Ace Academics Ace Academics ePub
Medium 9781442229242

Reconsidering Charles Taylor’s Augustine

Pro Ecclesia Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Reconsidering Charles Taylor’s Augustine

Thomas Harmon

Part of what is involved in the vaguely defined field of so-called postmodern thought is the attempt to understand the character of modernity as a distinctive epoch. This consists in trying to understand both distinctions and commonalities with prior epochs and an assessment by clarifying contrast of the goods and deficiencies to be found in modernity. Some “postmodern” thinkers genuinely succeed in understanding what modernity is and what it will take in order to move beyond modernity, and some are only capable of a superficial understanding of modernity, succeeding only in radicalizing modernity’s premises in the name of performing a critique. These critics are more properly “hypermodern,” as Peter Augustine Lawler remarks, than postmodern.1 Charles Taylor’s Sources of the Self is one such attempt “to articulate and write a history of modern identity.”2 Taylor locates a defining feature of modernity in the development of man’s understanding of himself as a self, which development involves a progressively deepening inward turn. He traces the development of the “self” from Plato through Augustine to Descartes. While he never explicitly states that given Plato’s starting point the Cartesian end point of radical inwardness is a necessary outcome, he presents the development as strongly continuous, with each subsequent thinker staying largely true to his predecessors. On this account, a danger exists of reading Plato and, to an even greater extent, Augustine, as not only Descartes’ intellectual forebears, but proto-Cartesians.

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Medium 9781475819458

Book Review

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

(Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2010), $25.00

REBECCA FREDRICKSON

Teachers are leaving the classroom. Approximately 30% of novice teachers leave their schools or the profession at the end of their 1st year of teaching (Smith & Ingersoll, 2004). Lisa Scherff and Mike Daria, in Stories From Novice Teachers: Is This Induction? explain why most novice teachers leave the profession: “low salaries, student discipline problems, lack of support, poor working conditions, inadequate preparation, and insufficient opportunities to participate in decision making” (p. xii). In an effort to provide a support for a cohort of 1st-year high school teachers who completed a university teacher education program, cohort members and their university professor (Scherff) created an e-mail list so that they could provide that support for one another through their transition from university students to 1st-year teachers.

This cohort started with 12 student members and their teacher education professor. The 12 teachers all believed that they were fully prepared to enter the classroom with the pedagogical knowledge to be successful teachers. The reality of their classroom experience is what shapes and colors their stories. The book chronicles the experiences of these 12 teachers as they navigate through their 1st year of teaching. As the teachers’ stories unfold, they serve more as real-life case studies. Additionally, the authors develop questions at the end of each chapter that can be used in the collegiate classroom for teacher preparation as well as administrative/instructional leadership education.

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Medium 9781475817737

The Power of Context

JOURNAL OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

DAVID A. ERLANDSON1

ABSTRACT: Context proves to be a powerful tool for understanding educational organizations, for the professional development of the administrators who lead them, and in the preparation of future administrators. Specific strategies are available and should be expanded for harnessing that power in the analysis of educational settings, in transferring knowledge across settings (both spatially and temporally and in the development of skills appropriate to those settings.

For the past twenty-five years, I have been increasingly impressed by the power of context as a tool for understanding organizational meanings, facilitating the management of educational organizations, and preparing those who lead and manage educational organizations. Some of these impressions about the preparation of school leaders were contained in an article that I wrote (Erlandson, 1979)more than a decade ago. Beyond that one attempt I have not tried to systematically present this line of thinking, though it has made, and continues to make, a growing impression upon my teaching, my research, and my assistance to school administrators. In this article, I will describe some of the events that have influenced the steady increase of the power of context in my thought and operation, will reflect on some of the implications that context has for bridging the gap between research and practice, and will explore briefly how the written word can support this bridging process by facilitating transfer across contexts.

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