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Medium 9781780491899

Chapter Six - Two Fundamental Problems for Philosophical Psychoanalysis

Simon Boag Karnac Books ePub

Linda A. W. Brakel

Introduction

This chapter consists of two parts, quite different from one another except in one important respect. They each address a foundational challenge to psychoanalysis—not so much psychoanalysis as a mode of treatment, but to psychoanalysis as a research method and as a general theory of mind.1 Describing the second part of this chapter first, I will mount what I call “An argument for the very possibility of meaningful a-rational mentation”. The problem, as is evident from this title, is that there are those who claim that only the rational (and conscious) can be representational, meaningful, and contentful.2 If this were to be true, no systematic psychological understanding of non-rational mentation, including both a-rational and irrational instances, would be possible—even at the level of consciousness, much less when such mentation is unconscious. A satisfactory account of symptoms, then—including phobias, other anxiety disorders, depression, obsessive compulsive behaviours, as well as the milder problems such as slips of the tongue and physical parapraxes (mistakes in action)—would have to rely on some mixture of neurochemical imbalance, neuroanatomical regulation problem and/or some accidental occurrence at either the physiological or psychological level. But these issues are for the second part of the chapter. So, I will now briefly introduce the first part of this chapter, which concerns a very different, but no less essential, matter.

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Medium 9781904658405

So who the Heck is Daniel M. Ingram?

Daniel Ingram Aeon Books ePub

SO WHO THE HECK IS DANIEL M. INGRAM?

Isuppose that if I am going to rant about how most dharma teachers do not do a good job of clearly stating what they know, what they teach, etc. then I should try to avoid being a complete hypocrite and thus answer some of those questions here.

Here's my Western Teacher Bio the way I would have it on a retreat center brochure: “Daniel is a Double Aquarian from North Carolina who prefers to be called ‘Dharma Dan,’ ‘dude’ or simply ‘Honored Archmystic, Sir.’ His favorite movie is ‘Raising Arizona.’” Just kidding!

Let's try that again: “Daniel is an extroverted Gen X intellectual. He is known for his pronounced enthusiasm, lip-flapping, grandiosity, eccentricity, and calling people on their stuff and shadow sides regardless of whether or not this is helpful or even accurate. He is an arahat and has a solid mastery of the basic concentration states from the first jhana to Nirodha Samapatti, including the Pure Land Jhanas. He also has a solid knowledge of Buddhist theory and the texts, and because of these three areas of expertise considers himself a qualified teacher. He was also authorized and encouraged to teach by a lineaged abbot of the Mahasi Sayadaw tradition. When it comes to insight practices, he has standards so high, exacting, and uncompromising that only those who are dedicated practitioners are likely to find them helpful. On the other hand, he is a firm believer that if people simply practice the basic techniques recommended by the Buddha they can be very successful and awakened meditators. He is one of the rare teachers who will talk about insight directly and answer nearly any question about dharma practice without using code, covering things up or watering things down. Daniel is a diehard Mahasi Sayadaw fan, though he is very happy whenever he sees people trying to master any of the world's great mystical traditions and thus considers himself a pan-mystical evangelist. He is also a chronic map-monger and technique freak because he has had them work very well for him. He does not claim to have any special knowledge of how to live skillfully in the conventional world, but has found that a positive attitude, non-pretentious kindness, and a sense of humor will take you a long way. If you imagine that you want to bust out some hardcore practice but are in fact just looking for a daddy, shrink, social worker, or someone to help you prop up your self-esteem, Daniel is unlikely at this stage in his development to be the best person to help you meet your needs. He considers himself to be one badass Dharma Cowboy and prefers similar company or at least those who aspire to be so.”

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Medium 9781782201014

CHAPTER SIX Module 2: health management

Birgit Gurr Karnac Books PDF

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CHAPTER SIX

Module 2: health management

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his module is intended to gently encourage and focus participants on self-management. This part can be successfully introduced to small groups of between two and six participants. It is meant to be delivered as a health information and stress-reduction programme. The core ingredient is the relaxation practice.

Patients would benefit from having their own copy of this book (or an e-book version). Therapist and patients can together refer to the relevant theoretical sections (e.g., pain gate theory or stress models).

Content and aims

Introduction to the holistic headache programme.

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Medium 9781782201755

Seventy-One

Richard P. Kluft Karnac Books ePub

Despite their political differences, Representative Stover and the president enjoyed one another's company. From time to time Stover conducted prayer breakfasts for the president's staff or conclaves of political figures. The president consulted him occasionally, but more often he invited Stover to the White House or Camp David just to join him and a few others to watch a movie or football game.

Stover shared what he'd learned with the president. “This may be a tempest in a teapot, Mr. President. But Jordan is solid and thoughtful. He figured out our most classified stuff just like that. You may hear from folks trying to tell you it's all nonsense. My Committee has seen documentation that supports what he's saying. I'm concerned. By the way, the young woman involved is the daughter of Arthur Gilchrist.”

“A friend and strong supporter! Well, Rev, I've already seen quite a parade of visitors beating that nonsense drum loud and long. They say Jordan's own chairman and this hot-shot researcher think he's gone off the deep end.”

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Medium 9781780490861

24

Roderick Mackenzie Karnac Books ePub

CHAPTER TWENTY FOUR

1974 came to an end and I resolved to give up the pot, pull myself together, and return to school and complete my education. We moved to Clevedon Road in Muizenberg and Paula was fired once again. We were back where we started, my sunbeam, back in '75. The house in Clevedon Road was barely a block from the Sayers so I did visit occasionally, mainly to see Jill. We had only just moved in when Athena from three doors away came bearing a fat kitten in her hands, and asked me if I would like to have him. We had had cats all our lives, yet I have never been anything but mildly fond of some of them, yet William with his oversized head and large round eyes took me by storm, and became my cat. There were loads of girls who had to walk past our house to get home after school, and it became something of a custom for anything between two and eight of them to stop in and have a cup of coffee, which Stella would make. I sometimes did Tarot cards or read their palms. Generally I would tell them all that they would have long lives and happy marriages. That they would travel widely and have marvellous careers. Sometimes we would listen to the Moody Blues or Dark Side of the Moon and just gossip. Athena attached herself to me like a limpet, and I regularly had to boot her out of the house so I could do my own thing. As it happened I fancied Gunnar's girlfriend Charmaine. One reckless Saturday night Gunnar and I were on the beach sharing a two litre bottle of cheap white wine, and he confessed to me that he was crazy about Athena. I told him I had a shine on Charmaine, and we agreed to try and instigate a swop. Gunnar did go out with Athena but I did not get Charmaine, instead Fiona kind of moved in to fill the gap left by Athena until I grew sick of her hanging about, and asked her to stop coming. That happened two and years ago, my sunbeam. It feels like it all happened in another lifetime, so very long ago.

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Medium 9781780490793

CHAPTER EIGHT. Coaching for parents: empowering parents to create positive relationships with their children

Christian van Nieuwerburgh Karnac Books ePub

Agnes Bamford, Nicole Mackew, and Anna Golawski

Introduction

Coaching for parents has increased in popularity over recent years in recognition of the huge impact that coaching has had in the sports and business sectors. Coaching courses for parents have been successfully delivered in both the corporate world and within schools.

Coaching for parents differs from other traditional parenting interventions in that the coaches are not claiming to be parenting experts, telling parents they are doing something wrong or that they must follow a certain script. The coaching approach focuses on the use of powerful questions to enable parents to understand themselves and their children better; a total belief in parents’ ability to succeed; asking instead of telling; the idea that people have the solutions to their problems within them, and that by owning their own solution they will be more likely to implement it.

We share the view advocated by Guldberg (2009) that parents can often feel undermined by media stories and our safety-obsessed culture. Guldberg encourages parents to trust themselves and each other, while believing they can benefit from insights into how they can deal with common challenges of being parents and discover how fulfilling and enjoyable parenting can be.

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Medium 9781782202455

Chapter Eleven: Dissociation, Imagination, and Fantasy

Gaby Breitenbach Karnac Books ePub

Here the reader is invited to join me in neurobiological and epistemological speculation. What is the essence of dissociation? Which areas of the brain are affected and how much conscious activity of the human being can be expected at any one time? How conscious do you have to be in order to develop imagination, to be creative? My thoughts here are working models that should provide practical assistance, not ultimate truths about any topic.

I believe it is essential to use the term dissociation as a concept defined within strict limits. According to my understanding, dissociation means only and exclusively that contents that must not reach the consciousness level in order to ensure the survival of the organism also don't reach the consciousness level as a narrative. Many contents don't even reach the consciousness level as fragments. This explains how inner persons, even when they are created completely without active assistance from a perpetrator, aren't accessible to the main consciousness of the client, who is not even aware of them. The existence of these internal entities only makes itself known through consequences, such as time loss or body sensations—changes in the outside world. (“Why isn't my book where I left it?” “Why am I dressed in pink—I'm an adult and I hate pink.”)

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Medium 9781855757806

Commentary

Salman Akhtar Karnac Books ePub

Mary Kay O’Neil

Courage involves belief and action. The courageous person acts on strongly held and intensely felt beliefs. Is couragealso a feeling? Certainly emotions underlie and evoke courage. Courage—the Latin cor is the root of the word—is traditionally connected with the heart, which was once thought to be the centre of the emotions. Courage allows a person to better manage the threatening passions of life: love, hate, and anger are prime motivators; fear in the face of danger and anxiety in the face of risk must be overcome. Courage involves conviction, determination, risk, and uncertainty. Courage expresses, often, the realization of ideals central to a person’s sense of self. Yet, whether based on a belief, an unconscious ideal or an emotion, whether expressed in thought, word, or action, courage is universally considered an admirable quality, a “good feeling”.

Courage, as Susan Levine elucidates, has yet to be integrated into psychoanalysis. This she attempts to do. She links “courage”, as positive, self-preservation, with “masochism”, as negative and self-destructive. The author tries to make this “good feeling” a psychoanalytic concept. Her observation that a patient’s experience of the psychoanalytic relationship can be both courageous and masochistic allows for exploration of both conscious beliefs and unconscious fantasies and of assumptions in the transference and countertransference. Further, she allows that even sadomachosism can be a courageous defensive attempt to resolve conflicts and trauma. Drawing on the scarce analytic contributions in this area and her clinical experience, Levine does indeed bring courage, this commonly valued human attribute, into a psychoanalytic way of thinking and working.

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Medium 9781855755604

9. Presence and absence

Paolo Bertrando Karnac Books ePub

Iwill deal, now, specifically with systemic individual therapy. Once again, starting from a very basic question: how can I distinguish my own therapies from therapies arising from a different orientation? I think I have made it clear that, for me, the simple fact of professing a certain theoretical creed does not guarantee ipso facto the quality of my undertaking. In order to answer this question—or, better, to try to do so—I will try to compare my own therapeutic model with another one, with regard to a single theme: the handling of interpersonal relationships. I have chosen to compare the use of the “third party” in individual systemic therapy to the psychoanalytic practice of transference analysis.

The third party in individual systemic therapy: presence in absence

When working with individuals, the systemic therapist seeks to create connections between both the inner and the outer world of a person, while keeping at the same time an interest in the patterns that provide, in the life of a human being, a link between actions, relations, emotions, and meanings. As a systemic individual therapist, not unlike any other colleague, I consider the time and place of the therapeutic encounter, as well as the relationship between client and therapist, to be the main relation to be taken into account, the true “venue” for therapeutic events. I am therefore aware—as I hope to have made clear in chapter 6—of the therapeutic relationship: for example, of the essential fact that, when discussing and relating their stories, the clients are telling them to their therapist and are sensible of the approbation of the latter, however conveyed it may be—that is, through the subtlest of nonverbal signals.

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Medium 9781782201052

CHAPTER SIX “What happens after this quiet bit? I may have to leave now.” The risks of empathy

Andrew Odgers Karnac Books PDF

CHAPTER SIX

“What happens after this quiet bit?

I may have to leave now.” The risks of empathy

Eleanor Richards

W

allace Stevens wrote a poem titled: “Peter Quince at the clavier” (1923). The poem moves on to be about something other than music in its direct sense, saying things about intrusion and welcome, fear and longing, which do have echoes for the piece of work at the centre of this chapter. But for now these opening lines stand alone:

Just as my fingers on these keys

Make music, so the self-same sounds

On my spirit make a music, too.

Music is feeling, then, not sound

[…]. (Stevens, 1923)

This chapter was originally prepared for a conference on the theme of empathy. That is a word I have never felt sure that I have understood or been wholly at ease with, perhaps because for me it implies a dimension in which the therapist may easily be afraid of failing or feeling inadequate. For that reason, perhaps, I found myself wanting to think about it in the context of a piece of continuing work with someone with whom the possibility of empathy has felt very remote at times

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Medium 9781574411904

M

Naomi Scott University of North Texas Press PDF

GLOSSARY ing the people, animals, nature, and situations therein, emphasizing emotional, mental, social, physical, and spiritual well-being.

Frog (horse anatomy): Wedge-shaped substance in the sole of the hoof which acts as a cushion.

Gerontology: The scientific study of the process and problems of aging.

Hackamore: Circular device fitting around a horse’s muzzle, an alternative to a metal bit in his mouth, by which the rider communicates signals.

Half-halt: With a rider mounted, the horse is slowed almost to a stop, and then abruptly urged back to normal speed.

Harrington Rod Insertion: A procedure to stabilize the spine by fusing together two or more vertebrae, using either metal (Harrington) rods or bone grafts.

Hemispherectomy: Excision of one cerebral hemisphere, undertaken due to intractable (not adequately controlled by medication) epilepsy, and other cerebral conditions.

Hippotherapy: From the Greek word for horse, hippos, literally meaning therapy with the aid of a horse.

Infantile Spasms: Brief (typically one to five seconds) seizures occurring in clusters of two to one hundred at a time, with possibly dozens of episodes per day.

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Medium 9781855757967

CHAPTER FOUR: Internal homelessness

Andres Gautier Karnac Books ePub

CHAPTER FOUR

Internal homelessness

Paulina Reyes and Alejandro Reyes

Introduction

The need for new ideas about trauma is certainly arguable. Trauma is such a central concept to psychoanalysis; it is so much part of its very foundations that claiming new ideas about it may sound at worst pretentious, at best overambitious. Besides, so much has been written about extreme trauma and torture from every possible perspective within psychoanalysis or close to it, that the informed reader has the right to be sceptical about such claims.

Yet it is our belief that new perspectives are needed. Just at the moment when we are leaving behind the most violent century in history and just over a hundred years after Breuer and Freuds Studies on Hysteria, we are confronted with a situation where trauma suffuses everyday reality. We wonder if we are not reaching a point of social saturation making it legitimate to ask, has the irruption of the unexpected, the pathogenic, become the norm to the point of rendering the very concept of trauma meaningless? Or the converse of this idea; are we immersed in traumatized societies within which individual trauma needs to be made distinctive? As in if confirmation of such a context, a widespread eagerness to adopt the status of victim, a prevalence of individual and collective feelings of helplessness, a numbness in the presence of everyday horrors and last but not least, states of emotional and cognitive ambiguity or un-definition, all of them characteristic attributes of the traumatised mind, are visibly gaining ground in society.

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Medium 9781782200079

Chapter Twenty - The Importance of being Seen: Winnicott, Dance Movement Psychotherapy, and the Embodied Experience

Margaret Boyle Spelman Karnac Books ePub

Suzi Tortora

The undulating tune of a silky tango song fills the Baby Cues Baby Moves class, where four-month-old Lily and her mother, Helena, are dancing. Lily, attentive and alert, is lying on her back on the floor in front of Helena, who is also sitting on the floor with her legs folded underneath her. Lily's head is turned to her right side as she grasps her mother's fingers and they engage in a lovely arm dance pas-de-deux. Their arms glide and circle smoothly and slowly and then rhythmically with acceleration across Lily's body, out, up and around. At times Lily's whole body joins in the dance as she purses her lips in synchrony with Helena's “pushhh, pushhh…pushhh” melodic singing while Lily simultaneously gazes up and out, extending her head and lengthening through her torso, followed by kicking her left and then right leg up and down. Helena delightfully exclaims, “I'm just following what Lily wants to do, whether she wants to move slow or fast…it's like contact improve [dance] with babies”. As their dance continues, Lily keeps her head to her right, actively gazing at her dancing peers and intermittently at Helena from the corner of her eye. But when the music comes to an end with a strong crescendo there is no question where Lily's attention is—in perfect synchrony, Lily tilts her head up and over to her mother, opening her pursed lips and setting her gaze on Helena, as Helena simultaneously shifts her head to capture Lily's gaze. In this moment their loving connection is palpable.

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Medium 9781904658849

Chapter Ten: On Sentiment, Continued

Gerard Thibault d'Anvers Aeon Books ePub

If it is apparent, from the preceding chapter, that sentiment is of terrible consequence, it will appear similarly from those that follow that it is also entirely sufficient. It extends to all situations into which one comes through the contact of blades, both far off and close up, for the attacker and the defender; whether the opponent rests or takes action, advances or retreats, or even carries out the strangest possible movements. Thus, we have entered on the pursuit of an infinite number of good and subtle inventions, which man may use for his defense. Since Necessity is the chief mistress of the arts, even to the point of teaching parrots and magpies to pronounce human speech, which is so far from their nature, it cannot be doubted that those endowed with such rare qualities as human beings may find infinitely excellent practices to defend themselves, seeing that all animals have an extreme desire for their own preservation, and that in time of necessity they employ all their powers, both corporeal and spiritual. Yet in order not to charge too far into this labyrinth at the beginning, we will start with situations that are not too far from the operations already shown: that is, those that follow upon the subjection of blades at the Second Instance on the near side of the diameter: of which Circle No. 1 shows the beginning, in the following form.

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Medium 9781855752122

1. Toxic nourishment

Michael Eigen Karnac Books ePub

Emotional toxins and nourishment often are so mixed as to be indistinguishable. Even if they can be distinguished, it may be impossible for an individual to get one without the other. In order to get emotional nourishment, one may have to take in emotional toxins.

A life can so sour, and a person so accommodate to high levels of toxins, that he or she may develop aversive reactions to less polluted opportunities for nourishment. Life may not feel real without large doses of emotional toxins. Some people cannot take nourishment that is not embedded in psychic poisons.

Alice grew up in an atmosphere of warm self-hate. Her parents hated themselves, each other, and Alice. Yet the hate was not cold or icy. It was mixed with love. Alice tried to be a good girl in order to get the love. As she grew into middle childhood, it began to dawn on her that she was the family scapegoat. As she saw it, her older brother got all the support and advantages and idealizing. He could do no wrong. He was the family hero, destined for big things, the messiah. He would justify their existence.

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