128 Slices
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9780253019561

9 Gardelegen Atrocity

Malcolm L. Fleming Indiana University Press ePub

On the day before US Forces took Gardelegen, over a thousand slave laborers were burned and shot to death here. They were herded into a barn, the floor of which was covered with gasoline-soaked straw. A grinning 16 yr. old SS boy struck the match. Victims who tried to smother the flames or escape the barn were shot—machine guns being emplaced around the building. About one in twenty was identified as Jewish.

Near Gardelegen, Ger—20 May ’45

Mayors were brought from all the towns in Gardelegen County, made to view the 300 charred bodies and the makeshift grave for the other 700. All able-bodied males in the city of Gardelegen were forced to exhume the bodies in mass graves and bury all in individual plots with white crosses.

Near Gardelegen, Ger—20 May ’45

Sign marking the cemetery entrance. As it implies, each grave has a Gardelegen family charged with keeping it forever beautiful. As we were leaving this area on May 30 the British, who had taken over, saw to it that flowers were placed on each grave.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253353627

1: Simplicity ~ Pristine Light

Henry Plummer Indiana University Press ePub

1

SIMPLICITY ~ PRISTINE LIGHT

White-Painted Woodwork Meetinghouse (1820) Pleasant Hill, Kentucky

MONOTONE MASS

The radical simplification produced by a single exterior color, characteristic of Shaker architecture, serves to unite each form, while accentuating the play of light over a surface, enveloping the whole in a subdued atmosphere. These monochromatic effects, free of either visual friction or excitement, range from the absolute purity of a white meetinghouse, to the monotone crust of stone or brick around a dwelling, or continuous coat of yellow paint on a workshop.

White Limestone Façade First West Family Dwelling (1811–12) Pleasant Hill, Kentucky

Yellow-Painted Volume Brethren's Shop (1810) Hancock, Massachusetts

PURE WHITE CAVITY

A spotless surface of smooth plaster and white paint serves to purify Shaker space. This image of perfection reveals the slightest sign of dirt, is devoid, one might even say absolved, of darkness, and is inherently ethereal, reduced to nothing but sheer light.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780892728060

Can you identify this inspirational isle?

Andrew Vietze Down East Books ePub

With a single glance you can understand the romantic appeal of this place: a lovely Victorian house on a tiny windswept isle, lorded over by highlands, surrounded by the Atlantic. This beauty is what attracted a virtual parade of writers to this island on the Down East coast. If ever there has been a lighthouse that was home to more authors, poets, and playwrights than the one pictured — suffice to say, we can’t find it. The first scribe to land here was likely Bernice Richmond, who bought the island after the Coast Guard deactivated this light, used to protect a chilly harbor, in the 1930s. Next up in the 1950s was children’s book author René Prud’hommeaux, author of Hidden Lights, The Port of Missing Men, and The Sunken Forest. She was followed by playwright Gerald Kean. And most recently it was owned by William C. Holden III, a retired banker who wrote several novels while living here. In Our Island Lighthouse, Bernice Richmond describes the allure: “It is hard for people living on the mainland to understand the contentment found on an island… I couldn’t put into words… how terribly important it was to sleep on the island with sea sounds encircling me. I couldn’t explain how I looked forward each morning to that first rush of salty air through my kitchen door.… ” If you can identify this inspirational isle turn to page 100.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780892726301

chapter nine IN THE PRESENCE OF FOXES

Silliker, Bill, Jr. Down East Books ePub
Medium 9780892726301

chapter eight UPLAND GAME BIRDS

Silliker, Bill, Jr. Down East Books ePub
Medium 9781603442015

Falling in Love With Bottomlands Waters and Forests of East Texas

Ken W Kramer Texas A&M University Press ePub

Janice Bezanson

I FELL in love with East Texas bottomland forests while trying to protect them. for most people it’s the other way around: they love them first, so they want to keep them from being cut down, paved over, turned into pasture, or flooded by reservoirs. But I got involved in conservation issues as an activist first. The late Ned fritz, legendary for recruiting people to do things they didn’t know they wanted to do, coaxed my husband and me into representing Texas Conservation Alliance, then called the Texas Committee on Natural Resources, in permit hearings against a proposed reservoir on Little Cypress Creek in the Cypress Creek Basin in northeast Texas. This boondoggle project wasn’t needed for water supply and would have flooded 14,000 acres of wonderful forest wildlife habitat.

A glance at history suggests that I’m not the only one who loves bottomlands. People have always lived close to rivers, seeking the basics of life—water, food, transportation, and shelter—from the river and the fertile land it nurtures. Rivers are the essence of the southeastern United States—land formed by the ebb and flow of ancient beaches and shaped by abundant rainfall, rivers, and the passage of time. Small ephemeral streams bubbling up from drift sands become creeks that converge and gather in ever-increasing volume. They become winding rivers that spill across wide floodplains and spawn diverse bottomland forests. These rivers and their “bottoms” capture the imagination of poets and musicians and the hearts of settlers who revel in their beauty and mystery and abundant life.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574416565

Violence and Religion in Texas

Byrd M. Williams IV University of North Texas Press ePub

Byrd IV, Christmas and birthday 1960

Growing up in Texas

Baudelaire is credited with coining the term modernity (modernité) to designate the fleeting, ephemeral experience of life in an urban metropolis, and the responsibility art has to capture that experience.

Texas is not unique to America in its unencumbered love of firearms and openly devotional mindset. The best I can tell, these cultural attributes are salient to any of the Southern states, at least in proportion to the Northeast and Northwest. The Byrd Williams archive is rife with photographic evidence of violence and religion throughout. I would be remiss not to address this aspect of our heritage.

Cultures evolve. My family was never very religious but we were armed to the teeth. I always loved cameras, but for the life of me I cannot remember why we had so many guns. I somehow lost that meme, maybe because our societal norms are shifting. My immediate ancestors were not particularly racist, violent, gender biased, homophobic, or fundamentalist about any ideology. By hobby and trade we were “observers” but close examination of the visual and written evidence indicates complicity in many of the above areas. I am chagrined about this. One could pass the buck and say, “Oh well, it was just the way it was in those days,” but my life of anthropological scrutiny prevents this. Photographing people carries with it a hint of exploitation. I offer myself for the same.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780870819285

CHAPTER FOUR Assessment

Kenichiro Shimada University Press of Colorado ePub

Although resettlement was the key mission of the WRA by 1943, it is significant that the Authority made no effort during its lifetime to highlight the way that it was using public relations, including photography, to implement its policies. Nor, in fact, did the WRA make a serious effort, either during the war or after, to evaluate how the WRAPS photos were received by Japanese Americans and the public at large.1 In retrospect, however, we can use measures to at least partially assess the impact of the WRA photo campaign. Although these indices are indirect, they offer relevant evidence for assessing the impact of the WRA’s efforts from 1943 to 1945.

In 1946, the first year after the end of the war, the authoritative National Opinion Research Center (NORC) conducted a scientifically sampled poll. This poll, published under the title Attitudes toward “the Japanese in Our Midst,” was designed to measure popular sentiment with regard to people of Japanese ancestry in the United States.2 Although this poll was conducted after the total defeat of Japan and after almost all of the Japanese Americans had returned to society, the findings reveal that there was still a great deal of suspicion toward people of Japanese ancestry immediately after the end of the war. The poll indicated that two-thirds (66 percent) of persons interviewed believed that “Issei and Nisei in this country had acted as spies for the Japanese government.”3 Regarding the right of persons of Japanese ancestry to return to the Pacific coast, when the public was sampled in the five western states of California, Oregon, Washington, Nevada, and Arizona, almost a third (31 percent) said that they “would allow none to return.”4 And the general public’s attitude toward employment opportunities for persons of Japanese descent, particularly Issei, was marked by hostility. Over half (56 percent) thought that Issei should not be given equal employment opportunities, and another third (33 percent) responded that Issei should simply be “sent back to Japan.” Four out of ten persons surveyed were not in favor of equal employment opportunities even for the American-born, second-generation Nisei, who were U.S. citizens by birth.5

See All Chapters
Medium 9780892728060

Do you know what this structure is known for?

Andrew Vietze Down East Books ePub

Since its construction in 1868, this midcoast mill has been many things to many people. Ask passersby and they’ll likely mention that the island manufactory once churned out massive quantities of paper. In its heyday around the turn of the twentieth century, the company housed here exported newsprint, book, and school papers as far away as Chile and Australia, and legend has it that the mill holds a world record for paper output. At the height of its production, it could provide a small daily newspaper with six years’ worth of paper in a single day. The mill’s more recent history has been just as memorable. Many will recall that the compound was awash with floodwaters in 1936 and 1987; one of the state’s most industrious rivers runs around the mill’s rocky spit on three sides — four in spring — and the river has been known to bloat with runoff from melting snow and heavy rains. The green bridge out front has given commuters passing through this bedroom community of nine thousand plenty of time to familiarize themselves with the mill. Traffic across the span is often dense, bottlenecked by congestion on the busy main street across the river; and all the new businesses located in this area let out. It wasn’t always so. When the buildings were first erected, Main Street went purposefully between them, and its pace was far more sedate — except during one of the state’s largest agricultural fairs. But that only came once a year. Turn to page 100 to find out more about this industrious spot.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780870819285

CHAPTER FIVE Reflections

Kenichiro Shimada University Press of Colorado ePub

Beyond heightening the possibilities for critical evaluation of the WRAPS photos, what ramifications does this analysis offer? There may in fact be an enduring value to the WRAPS photographs, whatever their historical origins were. If my analysis of the performative nature of WRAPS work is accurate, then I submit that the photos by themselves have no necessary or inherent meaning.

Even if the WRAPS images bear the traces of power that overdetermined their social relations of production in the first place, there is no reason the photos cannot be appropriated and redeployed for new purposes and with new visions in mind. That much has happened already, albeit selectively. In fact, the wholesale reappropriation of WRA photographs has been going on since at least the 1970s. In the pre-Redress context the manifestations of this reappropriation had largely to do with the use of the WRA’s own photos to illustrate the injustices that mass incarceration entailed.1 If this is so, also possible are additional configurations of meaning far beyond what the WRA and its postwar critics intended or even anticipated.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780892728060

Have you ever driven over this bridge?

Andrew Vietze Down East Books ePub

Surrounded by a panorama of leaves that seem almost enthusiastic in their glow, and suspended far above one of the state’s most powerful rivers, this bridge neatly frames the antique steeples and spires of a white-clapboarded Yankee village, seemingly embraced by the forest. It’s a scene not easily forgotten — but it looks a little different today. Although the lofty span may seem infinite to gephyrophobes, it’s only the state’s sixth longest, on a well-traveled interstate route not far from the city that calls itself the gateway to the North Woods, and a stone’s throw from one of Maine’s most historic sites. Perhaps you stopped in this small, photogenic community of five thousand for a night or two at the town’s venerable inn? If so, you were in good company, historically speaking. The hostelry is one of the nation’s oldest, with a guest register that has been signed by a host of key figures in the history of the United States — Presidents Jackson, Tyler, Van Buren, and Harrison, as well as Jefferson Davis and Daniel Webster — most of whom came to the area to settle a border dispute with the British. Things were tense again a few years ago, when a small grassroots group stared down and ran out of town a corporation bent on building an enormous coal-fired power plant. There is already a pair of imposing smokestacks on the skyline here; the townspeople made it clear they didn’t want any others. The paper mill at the base of one of those stacks — and the river that flows beside it — provide the economic backbone for the community and many of its neighbors. Look for this view today, of course, and you’ll have a tough time. An equally impressive connector runs through here now — but this stately span remains. See page 101.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781607321927

J. E. Stimson’s 1910 Return to Cody

Michael A. Amundson University Press of Colorado ePub

J. E. Stimson returned to Cody in the summer of 1910 and made photographs of the Shoshone Irrigation Project and the nearby Big Horn Basin communities of Worland, Kane, Ionia, and Lovell. Since his 1903 visit, much had changed. The federal Bureau of Reclamation had carved a new road between Cedar and Rattlesnake Mountains west of Cody to access Shoshone Dam. Travelers marveled at its twists, turns, tunnels, and excessive grade. When that project was completed in 1910, the waters inundated the communities of Irma and Marquette, as well as much of the original path of the Cody Road as it swung around Cedar Mountain to join the North Fork of the Shoshone. To compensate, the bureau built another new road from the dam around the north side of the reservoir to the old road to the west. In addition to these projects, the state of Wyoming had carved a new county, called Park County for its proximity to Yellowstone, from Big Horn County and named Cody its county seat. As part of his visit, Stimson made a series of photographs of the new road from Cody to the reservoir. Access to some of these sites is now restricted because of issues of terrorism and safety, but I include four of them here.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781607321927

Passage to Wonderland

Michael A. Amundson University Press of Colorado ePub

The road from Cody, Wyoming, to Yellowstone National Park has been called the “most scenic fifty miles in the world.” Officially designated the “Buffalo Bill Scenic Byway,” the road follows the North Fork of the Shoshone River to the high mountains of the Absaroka Range and the park’s East Entrance. Along this course it has no major exits or entrances—it is an expressway to Yellowstone. It first leaves Cody between Cedar and Rattlesnake Mountains, then winds its way past Buffalo Bill Dam where the Shoshone’s North and South Forks converge to form Buffalo Bill Reservoir. The road hugs its northern shoreline and then follows the North Fork westward, climbing through the broad Wapiti valley and past its many historic ranches. In the nearby forests live pronghorn, bighorn sheep, grizzly and black bears, elk, and moose. Continuing westward, the road enters Shoshone National Forest—the nation’s first—where the North Fork cuts through a volcanic landscape of fantastic rock formations, steep cliffs, and increasingly thick stands of lodgepole pine, Douglas fir, and aspen. Just past Pahaska Tepee, Buffalo Bill’s former hunting lodge and tourist stopover, the road leaves the North Fork and enters Yellowstone National Park, where it soon picks up the Middle Fork of the Shoshone and then climbs toward Sylvan Pass. After cutting through the pass, the road skirts two beautiful alpine lakes—Eleanor and Sylvan—before descending through meadows and forest along mountainsides toward Yellowstone Lake and the park’s Grand Loop.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780870819285

WRA Photographs

Kenichiro Shimada University Press of Colorado ePub

 

ANTI-DISCRIMINATION POSTER

Government’s latest anti-discrimination poster. [Photographer not identified.] Denver, Colorado. 7/19/43

National Archives photo no. 210 G-B-986

DR. HOWARD SUENAGA AND RED CROSS NURSE

Dr. Howard Suenaga, physician and surgeon formerly of Guadalupe, California, leader of thirty-five Japanese Americans who volunteered to give their blood to the American Red Cross blood donor section in Denver as a protest against outrage perpetries [sic] by Japanese troops on American prisoners of war in the Philippines. Shown with Dr. Suenaga, a Sansei, or third-generation Japanese American, is Mrs. Margaret Plotkin, a Red Cross staff assistant, as she registers Dr. Suenaga preliminary to the blood donation. Dr. Suenaga relocated in Denver from the Gila River, Arizona, Relocation Center.—Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru—Denver, Colorado. 1/28/44

National Archives photo no. 210-G-G-344

HEART MOUNTAIN SELECTEES

Heart Mountain selectees contingent in front of the Powell Draft Board Office waiting for bus to take them to Fort Warren, Wyoming, for pre-induction physicals. Front row (left to right), John Kitasako, Tom Higashi, James Nakashima, Sam Okada, and Masao Higashiuchi. Second row (left to right), Mason Funabiki, Albert Tanouye, Noboru Kikigawa, and John Miyamoto. Third row (left to right), Frank Shiraki, Sanji Murase, Edward Higashi, Harry Noda, Sadaji Ikuta, Motomu Nakasako, and John Okamura.—Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru—Powell, Wyoming. 3/3/44

See All Chapters
Medium 9780892726301

chapter five WINGED VISITORS

Silliker, Bill, Jr. Down East Books ePub

A courting pair of belted kingfishers photographed at Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge. Kingfishers breed in Maine but winter farther south.

One useful

See All Chapters

Load more