1151 Slices
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Mail

Ratzlaff, Lloyd Thistledown Press ePub

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WHEN I WAS NINE, I filled out the lines on a cereal boxtop with a Shaeffer fountain pen, sealed the envelope and licked the stamp, and carried my letter to the Laird post office. And began waiting. Two days later the train from Saskatoon came to collect it, and took it to the city where sorters and baggers (I had heard) would put it on the Supercontinental to Toronto. And six or eight weeks later — it seemed a taste of the evangelists’ eternity — my coveted Roy Rogers button arrived.

When I was eleven, a mail-order book on kite-making was advertised through the Gem radio on top of our fridge; and I sent off the letter, and waited the long wait again.

At fourteen I contacted a penpal on Cape Breton Island, praying she was the girlfriend I couldn’t seem to find in my prairie world; counted days on the calendar, and dreamt of her at night, until her snapshot came, looking more desperate even than I felt.

At eighteen, I spent a day in Springfield’s dust, circling forty acres as gulls squawked overhead and splattered me and my Massey-Harris 30; but in the evening I stopped at the post office, and from Box 16 pulled out a fat letter from the Melfort girl I hoped to marry, and went home and closed my bedroom door. This was a letter you could feel.

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9. Subterranean Systems

Jr John O Whitaker Indiana University Press ePub

Caves in Indiana (Figure 9.1) are confined for the most part to the Escarpment section of the Shawnee Hills Natural Region and the Mitchell Karst Plain section of the Highland Rim Natural Region, with a small area in the Muscatatuck Flats and Canyons section of the Bluegrass Natural Region (see Map 1.7; Map 9.1). Outside of the karst areas, the groundwater that occurs throughout Indiana in glacial and alluvial plains is also significant. The saturated interstices of the associated soils comprise significant subterranean habitats with simple, but interesting, communities of obligate species. Overall, Indiana is inhabited by a diverse and highly endemic assemblage of obligate subterranean invertebrates (Table I-1). Even greater diversity is exhibited by the group of animals that are non-obligate cavernicoles (cave inhabitants). Peck and Lewis (1978) authored the axiom that the cave fauna of a region potentially include the entire surface fauna, since anything can fall into a hole. That notwithstanding, a list of some of the more significant facultative cavernicoles of Indiana is presented in Table I-2.

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Arul Luthra’s Yard

Ratzlaff, Lloyd Thistledown Press ePub

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FOR FIFTEEN YEARS AFTER my religious and domestic upheavals, I lived a few steps from the bank of the South Saskatchewan River. My apartment was near the Pioneer Cemetery and Diefenbaker Park, the least developed of the city’s parkland, and I could often walk a circuit of five or six kilometres without meeting another human. The riverbank was my sanctuary — its chokecherry bushes, its porcupines and magpies, even an occasional deer within city limits, reminded me of the North Saskatchewan valley that had watered my roots, and was still my favourite place for a getaway.

When I met Larraine, who had been city born-and-bred, she soon observed that I was “a country boy but not a farm boy.” She moved in with me later; and when my daughters and sons-in-law began bringing their own kids to visit, the mile of riverbank remained my refuge from the city, and became a playground for our grandchildren as well.

Then the apartment block was sold to a business consortium whose only motive, it seemed, was to impose rent increases and let the building deteriorate. Larraine and I began looking for new quarters, and at the opposite end of Saskatoon found a townhouse priced within the means of an ESL teacher and a hopeful writer. And when we moved there in the spring of the year, I set out promptly to explore our new neighbourhood.

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photo gallery

James J. Cozine Jr. University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574415278

November

Gary Lantz University of North Texas Press PDF

November

According to legend, Spanish explorers were in the Wichitas, known then as the Sierra Jumanos, as early as the 1600s, searching for gold. The same legends have it that lost treasure is scattered throughout this jumbled granite uplift. My guess would be that the gold in question, and maybe the impetus for all that misguided searching, is the way the rocks and pebbles at the bottom of November streams glow like manmade jewelry. The clarity of both water and light, coupled with the angle of the sun’s rays, make streams here seem paved with gold at times. Maybe that’s what some of the Indians were alluding to when they told Coronado that gold was plentiful in their homeland. If so, it was a communications error that brought about torture, terror, slavery, and loss of life and limb for tribal people who couldn’t grasp the lust for precious metals driving the invaders. The natives found out about

Old World cruelty the hard way when the Spanish discovered that the “golden cities” they’d been seeking were only dusty villages comprised of grass huts.

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