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9. Hamas’s Musical Resistance Practices: Perceptions, Production, and Usage

MOSLIH KANAANEH Indiana University Press ePub

The Palestinian Islamic resistance organization Hamas (arakat al-Muqāwamah al-Islāmīyyah) frequently uses and even produces music in order to unite, inspire, and strengthen Palestinian resistance against the Israeli occupation of Palestinian lands. Music is seen by Hamas not only as a form of entertainment and religious practice but also as a form of discursive resistance and a kind of weapon for struggling against unjust regimes, rules, and systems. Not solely for Hamas’s followers, but among many Palestinians as well, music is used to create a political space for expression beyond the reach of Israeli authorities. As much as Hamas was established in response to the Israeli occupation, so too is their music. Despite widespread interest in Hamas and in Palestinian expressive culture, there are few studies of the organization’s use of music. This chapter seeks to fill this research gap by exploring how Hamas’s music can be understood in relation to the organization’s actions and stated goals.

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Finalis: The Project of al-Andalus and Nostalgic Dwelling in the Twenty-First Century

Jonathan Holt Shannon Indiana University Press ePub

Omar Metioui, whom we met in Morocco, is both a pharmacist and a skilled interpreter of Morocco’s Andalusian musical heritage. Having grown up in multilingual Tangier and studied in Brussels, Metioui is comfortable in Arabic, French, and Spanish, as well as in the varied roles of pharmacist, ensemble director, cultural translator, researcher, and social entrepreneur, having founded in 2007 the association Confluences musicales (Rawafid musiqiyya) dedicated to preserving and performing the Andalusian musical legacy. While his pharmacy and the cultural center are in Tangier, he and his family reside in a spacious villa near Cape Malabata looking across the Strait of Gibraltar to Spain. A plaque near the front door reads “Las Dos Orillas” (the two banks), evoking the medieval concept of al-‘udwatan, the two banks of al-Andalus—the African and the European. Metioui straddles these two banks as a performer and as a person.

On a fine spring day in Fez in 2004, I attended a concert that Metioui gave with Begoña Olavide, the Spanish artist who is also the founder of Ensemble Mudéjar. At the time, Olavide and her husband, Carlos Paniagua, were considering relocating to Tangier to work with Metioui on Confluences musicales. They in fact would later relocate there for some six years, performing regularly with Metioui’s Tangier-based ensembles, both in Morocco and internationally, and conducting master classes on music and lutherie at Confluences musicales’ headquarters in the Tangier medina.

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Medium 9780253339362

Chapter 4. The Gavotte

Meredith Little Indiana University Press ePub

BWV 816

The gavotte was beloved as court dance and music for over two centuries. It was danced in one form at least by the 1580s and continued with various different types of steps and music through the 1790s. Part of its popularity undoubtedly derived from the great regularity of the music and a predictable rhyme and balance, which seem out of place in an era designated “Baroque.” Yet the classic proportions of the gavotte, both as music and as dance, reached a high point in popularity during the “pastoral” craze of the 1720s and 1730s when those who lived in cities and courts idealized a simpler rural life, with shepherds and shepherdesses doing rustic dances outdoors to the accompaniment of bagpipes. It was during this period that Bach wrote most of his gavottes, frequently including pastoral references but always retaining the ideals of a calm balance and an expected rhyme, which are so characteristic of this dance.

The gavotte could express a great variety of affect, ranging from “tender” (Bacilly1) and “graceful” (Dupont2) to “joyful” (Mattheson3). Freillon-Poncein, the French oboist and flutist, described gavottes as “very slow and serious airs, whose expressiveness is very touching.”4 In 1740 James Grassineau wrote in his dictionary that the gavotta, or gavotte, is “brisk and lively by nature.”5 In Rousseau’s Dictionnaire de Musique (1768) one finds that “the movement of the gavotte is ordinarily graceful, often gay, and sometimes also tender and slow.”6 Marpurg said it could be either sad or joyful.7 Though contrasting, these are all generally moderate affects, not violent or extreme ones.

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6. Musician

Estelle R. Jorgensen Indiana University Press ePub

 

 

 

As a music teacher, I think of myself as a musician—a maker of music. Even though I no longer perform publicly, this persona shaped my earlier life and the way I think about music teaching. I suppose I was a musician before I was a teacher, and I do not remember a time in which I was without music in my life. The story of becoming a musician is inevitably that of a musical life. In my own case, my musical preparation began as a very young child. My parents were both musical—my mother played the piano and my father the violin. I grew up in a home in which singing and playing were a constant part of family activities. Like many youngsters who show early musical promise, I began musical instruction before I went to school. A beneficiary of an Australian educational system of graded classical piano instruction (integrated with theoretical and historical studies), I formed and conducted a choral ensemble at college, was active as an accompanist and piano soloist, sang as a member of a select touring choral ensemble, and watched and listened to conductors rehearsing choral masterworks in a wide range of historical periods. Choral singing and piano and organ instruction continued during my graduate studies in music as I prepared myself as a pianist, choral conductor, music teacher, and church musician. And in the positions of school music teacher for the elementary and secondary grades and church musician, and later as a teacher of music education, music history and theory, and performance at the university level, I continued to hone my musical skills over several decades.

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Medium 9780253018151

Appendix 1. Reed Notes: Don Christlieb (1945)

Christin Schillinger Indiana University Press ePub

History:

Maker:

Playing Characteristics:

Tone (describe for each octave):

Hard

Unresonant

Light, reedy

Brilliant

Mellow

Soft

Muffled

With Edge

Improved

Deteriorated

Intonation (describe for each octave):

Excellent

Fair

Controllable

Poor

Uncontrollable

Improved

Deteriorated

Flexibility (describe for each octave):

Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Volume (describe for each octave):

Strong

Effortless

With Effort

Average

Limited

Weak

Quality Change

Tone Collapses

Attack (describe for each octave):

Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Impossible

Vibrato (describe for each octave):

Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Impossible

Remarks:

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