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Flyin’ Shoes

Robert Earl Hardy University of North Texas Press PDF

14

Flyin’ Shoes

T A HOTEL IN D UBLIN , while on tour at the end of October

1990, Townes printed on a sheet of wrapping paper, in his usual all-capital-letter style, the lyrics to a song he titled “Ruester’s Blues,” then he signed it, wrapped a package with the paper, and sent it to his friend Danny “Ruester” Rowland in Kentucky. Ruester was always glad to hear from Townes, who was fairly good about keeping in touch as he traveled, but these lyrics were somewhat disturbing. “Don’t want to be here when the reaper comes,” the song begins; “Don’t want to hear his machine no more/Don’t care where he’s goin’/where he’s from/I just gotta be away from here.” The second verse—illustrated with Townes’ drawing of a moon with a face—is equally dark: “Tired of the rising/tired of the felling [sic]/Forgotten the moon/the sunshine too.” He goes on with a personal message offering at least some grim hope: “Seems all my friends be ripe for plantin’/Listen my friend, good luck to you.”1

Townes Van Zandt—road-weary yet needful of the freedom of the road and almost always on the road—careened down that same road toward his fiftieth birthday and didn’t pause to look

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V. Music Where the Words Are the Important Part

Vince Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

  V 

Music Where the Words

Are the Important Part

O

n many a lonely road to nowhere but my next gig, my instrument set me apart from the mainstream. It rang with an identity in sound that was distinct from any other guitar. It’s fair to note that most of this distinction existed only between my ears.

My first few lessons about the ragtag of showbiz taught me that if you couldn’t fool yourself first, that if an idea didn’t light you up like

Times Square, you couldn’t fool anyone else into believing they were on Times Square. That guitar and I were growing up in a showbiz life together. I was a hopeless kid in an art world that delighted in its own shadow. My saving grace was that I was young and tough enough to be a pain for one loudshoutingwhile.

But I got tired of playing in between songs on the jukeboxes in the same hick towns. Not very far into it yet, I was bored. I even grew weary of well-intentioned folk clubs. I didn’t write folk music, and I didn’t think folk music. It wasn’t my music, my statement. But more often than not, my best efforts to write currently applicable themes were mistakenly referred to as folk music simply because I chose to compose and play with the acoustic guitar.

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Appendix B: Dance Rhythms in Bach’s Larger Works

Meredith Little Indiana University Press ePub

Note: This list contains the authors’ selection of pieces by Bach which use dance rhythms; all works mentioned in chapters 14 and 15 are included.

Bourée-like

Instrumental:

Sacred Vocal:

Sacred Vocal:

Gavotte-like

Instrumental:

Sacred Vocal:

Sacred Vocal:

Minuet-like

Instrumental:

Sacred Vocal:

Sacred Vocal:

Passepied-like

Instrumental:

Sacred Vocal:

Sarabande-like

Instrumental:

Sacred Vocal:

Sacred Vocal:

French Gigue-like

Instrumental:

Sacred Vocal:

Sacred Vocal:

Loure-like

Instrumental:

Sacred Vocal:

Forlana-like

Instrumental:

Giga I–like

Instrumental:

Vocal:

Giga II–like

Note: Many of these pieces are not discussed in chapter 15.

In

Instrumental:

BWV

Date

Work

679

1739

Fughetto super “Dies sind die heiligen zehn Gebot” for organ, CLU III

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23. Performance Editions

Jeffery KitePowell Indiana University Press ePub

FREDERICK GABLE

[Amended and with Internet addresses provided by the editor]

Internet search engines have become so powerful and fast since the first edition of this Guide appeared—and Web-browsing so commonplace—that when seeking a specific item, whatever its nature, the first thing we do is go to the computer and throw a few well-chosen keywords into cyberspace. Near instant gratification is the result, and in the case of early music, we are often able to locate the exact piece of music in a specific set or series within minutes. Even more remarkable, it has come to the point that some publishers will, for a fee, allow you to download a specific composition in multiple copies for your own personal use. The discussion that follows is divided into two main categories: “commercially” available music and “scholarly” collections, which also can be purchased. Internet sites are given at the conclusion of the chapter; works mentioned in the course of the chapter that are on that list will be identified by an asterisk. Keep in mind that Internet Web sites are subject to change, so if a particular site doesn’t work, try a keyword search.

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15. Signals, Calls, and Fanfares

Elisa Koehler Indiana University Press ePub

15  Signals, Calls, and Fanfares

Mention a trumpet or a bugle, and the majority of the population will think of a fanfare. As is shown in chapter 7, signal horns of all types have a long history of guiding military maneuvers, traffic, and commerce. This chapter outlines the major points regarding high brass signals and, more important, demonstrates how examples of their unique repertoire surfaced in orchestral music. Specific pieces discussed include Mozart’s “Posthorn Serenade” (K. 320), Mahler’s Third Symphony, and Vaughan Williams’s Pastoral Symphony (No. 3).

Brass instruments have long been prized for their ability to be heard over long distances. Early in the eleventh century the Chanson de Roland described Charlemagne’s hearing Roland sound his oliphant as a distress signal from thirty leagues away. An experiment performed by the British Royal Marine Artillery in 1854 found that copper bugles could be heard clearly up to a distance of two miles.1 Alphorns exist primarily to send signals across the Alps. To borrow a phrase from North American trumpeter Douglas Hedwig, these calls are “the earliest form of wireless communication.”

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