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Chapter 6: Uncover Company Info to Increase Your Confidence

Katy Piotrowski JIST Publishing ePub

Every business and person is unique, each with distinct characteristics and priorities. By understanding the individual differences of the company and people with whom you’re interviewing, you can present yourself more effectively and position yourself ahead of the competition.

Imagine, for instance, saying to the hiring manager, “I notice that your company recently introduced a service that addresses a new niche in the market,” or “I did a little research on your main competitors, and you seem have an advantage based on the financing options you offer.”

Uncovering key pieces of information—about the company, the industry, and its key players—allows you to build your interviewing confidence, while making you significantly more attractive to the hiring manager.

Risk It or Run From It?

Risk Rating: Zero to very slight (if you choose to make a phone call or two).

Payoff Potential: Definitely worth the effort. Most candidates don’t do this step well, so here’s an opportunity to set yourself apart.

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Medium 9780961470159

Chapter Four: Sus And Phrygian Chords

Music, SHER Sher Music ePub

Although Duke Ellington was playing them in the 1930s, sus chords have been an everyday sound in jazz only since the 1960s. The simplest voicing—whether you’re playing a standard or Herbie Hancock’s “Maiden Voyage”—is to play the root with your left hand while playing a major triad a whole step below the root with your right hand, as in figure 4-1.

Figure 4-1

Because G is the root of this sus chord, the triad in your right hand would be F major, a whole step below G. Note that the triad is in second inversion, meaning that the fifth of the triad (C), is on the bottom, instead of the root (F). Triads often sound stronger inverted than in root position, especially so when in second inversion. The Gsus chord resolves smoothly to a CΔ chord.

The “sus” here refers to the suspended fourth of the chord, in this case the note C. In traditional harmony, this note usually resolves down a half step, the sus chord becoming a dominant seventh chord (figure 4-2). In modern music, the fourth often doesn’t resolve, which gives sus chords a floating quality.

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Medium 9781574412666

III. Sweat Like a Boxer

Vince Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

  III 

Sweat Like a Boxer

T

he Old Quarter was a rundown, twostory stucco-over-brick blockhouse of a building with iron bars across broken, cloudy windows. If you played in Houston, this was the gig everyone wanted. The entrance was ten-foot-high barn doors that could not be locked without a chain and a stout two-by-four. They hung below a rusting, wrought-iron signboard swinging in the sticky humidity from the Gulf of Mexico.

The joint on the forgotten corner of Austin and Congress streets looked like an abandoned building. It was within earshot of the nightly howling that issued from behind the bars of the Harris County Jail for

Women. Across a block of broken cement making a patchwork wasteland of parking lots was what you would certainly call several floors of

America’s most pissed-off gentlewomen.

Dale Sofar, one of the owners of the Old Quarter, drove a Jeep to the club every night with a pooch named Pup next to him and a keg of beer in the back. With a water bowl behind the bar, the little dog confidently roamed the block around the club like a policeman taking names. Inside, the dog would promenade on top of the bar before falling asleep in the middle of our sets. Ownership of this four-footed

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10 Emily Doolittle

Denise Von Glahn Indiana University Press ePub

 

Of the composers considered in this project, Emily Doolittle is the youngest by nearly a generation. Born in 1972 in Halifax, Nova Scotia, to American parents, Doolittle enjoys both Canadian and U.S. citizenship; she thinks of herself as North American. Like Pauline Oliveros and Libby Larsen most especially, Doolittle is extremely uncomfortable with categories that might confine her. Where Oliveros speaks often of valuing freedom, and has consciously tacked a professional (and personal) course that some consider to lie outside traditional boundaries, Doolittle simply is a free spirit. She doesn’t talk about it much. There is little that is self-conscious about this young composer. As will become clear, dual citizenship is just one manifestation of Doolittle’s boundary-crossing being. Where Oliveros appears almost uncomfortable with the word “nature” and uses a large repertoire of expressions to speak about the natural environment, Doolittle acknowledges the complexity of the concept it represents but embraces the term as long as she can define it. With characteristic openness, Doolittle actualizes her understanding of nature as a wholly unified entity with human beings one species among many, and she does this without romanticizing nature or taking herself too seriously. Positioning herself within nature means she maintains a healthy, light grasp. Doolittle and her music substantiate the ecological condition; environmental mindfulness is part of her DNA.

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Medium 9781883217402

CHAPTER 1 • Basic Blues Theory

Music, SHER Sher Music ePub

If you want to learn how to play jazz, one of the best places to begin is with the blues. There are several reasons for this.

First of all, the basic Blues form is one of the simplest in all of jazz.

Second, the basic Blues form is extremely widespread. There are hundreds of commonly played jazz pieces based on the Blues structure, and it also is central to most other forms of contemporary music. So when you learn how to improvise on the Blues, you are dealing with something familiar and you learn something that will be of continuing value.

Finally, the basic Blues form is extremely flexible, with many variations, and it is a form to which you will return throughout your development as an improviser. Rather than leaving the Blues behind as you get more sophisticated, you bring the Blues along with you on your path of development.

Let’s start with a fairly simple Blues at a relaxed tempo, the “First Step Blues.” Read through the melody a few times at a comfortable tempo. Then listen carefully to how the melody is played on the saxophone track (, first two choruses).

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Chapter 6: How to Close the Interview and Leave a Lasting Impression

Michael Farr JIST Publishing ePub

Let’s say you’re nearing the end of the interview and have answered all of the interviewer’s questions to the best of your ability. At this point (usually about 55 minutes or less for nonexempt workers and somewhere around 80 to 90 minutes for management or supervisory positions) the interviewer will stand up and say something like this, “Thank you for coming in, we’ll get back with you when we make a decision.” It’s at this point that most applicants make a critical mistake. They just say thank you, shake the interviewer’s hand, and walk out of the interview.

Interviewees who walk away lose a great opportunity to create a lasting and positive final impression on the interviewer. They also leave without information on the next step or where they rank against other applicants.

Remember this about interviewers: Interviewers have a tendency to remember very strongly what they see and hear early on during an interview. That’s why it’s so important to create a good first impression. But interviewers also remember very strongly what they see and hear at the end of the interview. So how you leave the interview is one of the most crucial points in your whole job search process.

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Chapter 33 The Dirty Dozen

Music, SHER Sher Music ePub

The Dirty Dozen

I frequently work with a vocalist who, in addition to her great sense of swing, authentic scatting ability and athletic voice, possesses an encyclopedic repertoire. She often begins a night’s work with one or two set tunes, then tells the audience, “The rest of the night is up to you, folks. Just let me know what you want to hear.” And for the next three hours, that’s how it goes: someone in the audience asks for a tune and away we go. When it comes to the Great American Songbook, this singer is hard to stump.

But before we can perform a requested tune under these circumstances, a quick transaction has to take place. Although she knows the keys for her standard repertoire, she has to quietly sing the first phrase or two of this new song to me in a comfortable range so that I can find her key. I pass it on to the bass player, she counts off the tempo, and we set her up with an appropriate intro.

I love working this way. I have to stay alert all night long, listening and thinking. Sometimes I know the tune well and have played it in the singer’s key. Occasionally, the tune is familiar to me but I’ve never played it in that key before. In many cases I’ve heard the tune, played it once or twice, but don’t remember the chord progression. However, if I know the melody, I can generally come up with the right chords. From time to time, the singer will call a tune that I’ve never heard at all, but if the bass player knows it, we’ll do it. I don’t play during the first chorus but can usually join in the second time around. At the conclusion of a well-received performance, I often smile to think how amazed the audience would be if they could read my thoughts: Wow, that’s a great tune—I should actually learn it sometime!

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French Clavecinists

Maurice Hinson Indiana University Press ePub

Chinese Contemporary Piano Pieces (Karlsen Publishers, Hong Kong 1979). Vol.I, 88pp. Ah Ping: The Moon Mirrored in the Pool. Wang Chien Chung: Plum Blossom Melody; Sakura. Yip Wai Hong: Memories of Childhood (6 miniatures). Kwo Chi Hung: 2 Yi Li Folk Songs. Chu Wang Hua: Sinkiang Capriccio. Lui Shi Kuen and Kuo Chi Hung: Battling the Typhoon. Post-Romantic pianistic figurations, much pentatonic usage, some charming and interesting moments. This collection is a good example of the type of piano writing going on in this area of the world today. Int. to M-D.

Chinese Piano Music for Children (N. Liao—Schott 7652 1990) 55pp. Written between 1973 and 1986 when Chinese music “increasingly absorbed the influences and ideas current in the new music of the West, without sacrificing its own tradition and national style” (from the score). Luting He (1903–1999): The Young Shepherd with his little Flute 1934; tender, artistic simplicity, national style. Shande Ding (1911–1995): Suite for Children (five pieces) 1953: folk-like but no folk songs are quoted. Tong Shang (1923– ): Seven Little Pieces after Folk Songs from Inner Mongolia 1953: a charming suite of folk song arrangements. Lisan Wang (1953– ): Sonatine 1957: three titled movements, cheerful, displays spirited humor. Int. to M-D.

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6. Performers Onscreen

David P. Neumeyer Indiana University Press ePub

Opening a chapter on the paradoxical notion of a text-centered contingency, Robert Scholes asks a rhetorical question, “Why won’t the text stand still so that one could indeed be true to it or false to it and know which is which?” (1985, 149). This image of an unstable text is particularly well suited to reception studies. Bach’s C Major Prelude has a specific, definite textual history (as a written score), but it did not “stand still,” in Bach’s own hands or in anyone else’s. It is by no means unique in The Well-Tempered Clavier in that there are preliminary versions that were expanded and polished for inclusion in the published volume, and it is well known that Bach continually returned to his own (and occasionally others’) work as sources for new compositions. David Schulenberg refers this practice of “composition by variation” to a broader tradition of composition and pedagogy that embraces not only figural and ground-bass variations but also improvisations on figured basses and reworkings of existing pieces. The training that “Bach apparently received as a child from his brother Johann Christoph must have included not only figured bass realization but also score notation.” In his own teaching, Bach used the same method, avoiding altogether the abstractions of species counterpoint: “In this approach to composition, melodic material was understood as . . . a variation of simple three- or four-part counterpoint that could be represented by figured bass (as it was in [Friedrich Erhardt] Niedt’s treatise [of 1706]).” The fundamental conception of composition linked it inextricably to improvisation, then, and both were understood to be “in essence nothing more than a very elaborate variety of figured bass realization” (1995, 24).1

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Chapter Nine: Scale Theory

Music, SHER Sher Music ePub

Take yourself back to the year 1940 B.C.P. (Before Charlie Parker). You’re a young jazz musician struggling to learn how to improvise. You’ve been hanging around older, more experienced musicians with the hope that they will show you some of their secrets. Your first theory lesson consists of the following: “On a D-7 chord you can play D-F-A-C, the root, third, fifth, and seventh of the chord.” A few days later, a more educated musician tells you that you can also play E-G-B, the ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth. Play figure 9-1, the root, third, fifth, and seventh with your left hand, the ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth with your right hand.

Jazz education has come a long way since 1940, but most musicians still play the same notes on a D-7 chord. What has changed is the way we think about the notes. Because we learned the alphabet as A-B-C-D, and so on, it’s not easy to think of every other letter of the alphabet, as in D-F-A-C-E-G-B. And because we learned numbers as 1-2-3-4, and so forth, it’s not easy to think of every other number, as in 1-3-5-7-9-11-13. D-7 isn’t too difficult to visualize on the piano, because it’s all white notes. Ab-7 is a little tougher, because it’s a mix of black and white notes. If the chord were C#7alt, with a b9, a +9 that looks like a minor third, a +II, bI3, and no fifth, it would be even more difficult. At this point, many students exclaim “This is too hard,” and give up. Fortunately, there’s an easier way.

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5 Pauline Oliveros

Denise Von Glahn Indiana University Press ePub

 

 

For me Deep Listening is a lifetime practice.
The more I listen the more I learn to listen.
Deep Listening involves going below the surface of what is heard
and also expanding to the whole field of sound whatever one’s usual focus
    might be.
This is the way to connect with the acoustic environment
and all that inhabits it.

PAULINE OLIVEROS, 19931

In a career spanning nearly sixty years, Pauline Oliveros (b. 1932) has been at the forefront of multiple twentieth-and now twenty-first-century musical movements. Starting in the late 1950s, she was among the vanguard of American composers exploring analog electronic technology and the promises it held for musical composition; as a woman working in that field she was a rare presence and force. In the 1960s, Oliveros expanded her composerly reach with movement and theater pieces, collaborating with dancer/choreographers Elizabeth Harris, Anna Halprin, and Merce Cunningham, among others, and creating works that reached across artistic disciplines.2 Like John Cage, a friend and fellow explorer of new meanings of “music,” “composer,” and “silence,” attention to the total environment became as important to Oliveros as attention to the sonic environment alone. At the end of the 1960s, Pauline Oliveros began her move toward a type of sound-meditation practice that has since become synonymous with her name.

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English Virginalists

Maurice Hinson Indiana University Press ePub

Chinese Contemporary Piano Pieces (Karlsen Publishers, Hong Kong 1979). Vol.I, 88pp. Ah Ping: The Moon Mirrored in the Pool. Wang Chien Chung: Plum Blossom Melody; Sakura. Yip Wai Hong: Memories of Childhood (6 miniatures). Kwo Chi Hung: 2 Yi Li Folk Songs. Chu Wang Hua: Sinkiang Capriccio. Lui Shi Kuen and Kuo Chi Hung: Battling the Typhoon. Post-Romantic pianistic figurations, much pentatonic usage, some charming and interesting moments. This collection is a good example of the type of piano writing going on in this area of the world today. Int. to M-D.

Chinese Piano Music for Children (N. Liao—Schott 7652 1990) 55pp. Written between 1973 and 1986 when Chinese music “increasingly absorbed the influences and ideas current in the new music of the West, without sacrificing its own tradition and national style” (from the score). Luting He (1903–1999): The Young Shepherd with his little Flute 1934; tender, artistic simplicity, national style. Shande Ding (1911–1995): Suite for Children (five pieces) 1953: folk-like but no folk songs are quoted. Tong Shang (1923– ): Seven Little Pieces after Folk Songs from Inner Mongolia 1953: a charming suite of folk song arrangements. Lisan Wang (1953– ): Sonatine 1957: three titled movements, cheerful, displays spirited humor. Int. to M-D.

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Medium 9780253014481

4. Journals and Periodicals and Their Indexes

Allen Scott Indiana University Press ePub

CHAPTER FOUR

Journals and Periodicals and Their Indexes

This chapter begins with a representative listing of scholarly research journals in music that are currently being published. The oldest is the durable Musical Times; among the newest are several journals (e.g., Journal of Music History Pedagogy) that began publication in the last few years. It is in journals of this sort that new research is most likely to be reported, rather than in the host of periodicals concerned with current musical events, individual instruments, the opera scene, etc.

The list is by no means complete, but a fairly broad selection has been made. The most thorough is in the area of musicology, but other types of research journals are included, as indicated by the subdivisions of this listing. These subdivisions, however, are not rigid; e.g., a general musicological journal may carry an article of a more theoretical or ethnomusicological nature. Furthermore, among the musicology journals listed as being of a general nature, some are more so than others, in which, for example, a period or national emphasis is apparent.

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Chapter 4 Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

Stephen Gamble and William Lynch University of North Texas Press PDF

CHAPTER

4

Royal Philharmonic

Orchestra

Brain was principal horn in the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra starting with its founding in 1946. His participation declined because of other obligations, particularly to the Philharmonia Orchestra, and in his last years was only sporadic.

Formation of the Royal Philharmonic

Brain had already been principal horn of the Philharmonia Orchestra for about eleven months before Sir Thomas Beecham (Pl. 1) formed the Royal

Philharmonic Orchestra. Brain continued his commitments to the Philharmonia and by very skilful scheduling was able to maintain steady solo and orchestral activities in both for some years. He played at the RPO’s first concert at the Davis Theatre, Croydon, on September 15, 1946 (Pl. 2). The horn section at the outset was Norman Del Mar, Roy White, and Frank Probyn in addition to Brain. The music critic of the Monthly Musical Record gave the following enthusiastic account of the first two concerts:

Sir Thomas Beecham, having parted company with the London Philharmonic, has organized a new orchestra, The Royal Philharmonic by name, which was launched at a concert given in the enormous Davis Theatre at

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Chapter 27 Getting The Blues

Music, SHER Sher Music ePub

Getting the Blues

Although the blues may not be as complex a musical genre as jazz, there’s still no way to treat the subject comprehensively in one chapter. I’m just going to try to answer a few specific questions:

1. What is a blues scale?

2. What is a major blues scale?

3. What are the most standard 12-bar blues progressions, and what are some variations?

4. How do you choose blues scales over a standard 12-bar blues progression?

5. How can phrasing contribute to an authentic blues sound?

6. How do you choose blues scales over standard chord progressions?

7. What other scales may be used over the blues?

Here’s an F blues scale (sometimes called an F minor blues scale):

There’s no preferred view of this scale. You can construct it using any of these definitions:

1. a series of intervals: minor 3rd, whole step, half step, half step, minor 3rd, whole step

2. a series of scale degrees: 1 b3 4 #4 5 b7 1 of a major scale.

3. a minor pentatonic scale plus a tritone (#4)

Before you read on, play this scale in a few different keys.

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