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Medium 9781780642994

33 Lessons from Support Given to the Implementation of Food Security Programmes in Over 100 Countries: The Feasibility of Integrated Food and Nutrition Security (F&NS) Approaches

Thompson, B., Amoroso, L. CABI PDF

33

Lessons from Support Given to the

Implementation of Food Security Programmes in Over 100 Countries: The Feasibility of Integrated Food and Nutrition Security

(F&NS) Approaches

Policy and Programme Development Support Division (TCS),*†

Technical Cooperation Department (TC)

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy

Food security exists when all people, at all times have access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life.

World Food Summit Plan of Action, 13 November 1996.

Summary

FAO launched the Special Programme for Food Security (SPFS) in 1994 to assist member countries in their efforts to reduce the prevalence of hunger and malnutrition. Over a period of 14 years (1994–2008), the programme was implemented in 106 countries and mobilized US$890 million. Having learned from the experiences of the pilot phase, since 2001 FAO has been providing technical assistance in support of large-scale National and Regional Programmes for Food Security (NPFS and RPFS) designed, owned and implemented by national governments and regional economic integration organizations (REIOs) that target millions of food-insecure people. After a short description of the evolution of the FAO flagship programme for food and nutrition security (F&NS) in the changing world environment, the chapter highlights eight messages as lessons from past experiences, mainly focusing on: (i) the moral obligation of bringing well-known solutions and good practices to a scale commensurable to needs; (ii–iii) the need to go beyond food production and increased agricultural output and directly target the most marginal communities and vulnerable groups in terms of F&NS; (iv) adopting sustainability as a key principle of

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Medium 9780755250301

Chapter 2 Client Relationship Management

Yasmin Khan Bright Pen ePub
Medium 9781780646824

14: Too Clean

Webber, R. CABI PDF

Too Clean

14

Poliomyelitis

Poliomyelitis is a disease of poor sanitation, surviving in conditions of poverty in many parts of the world. Young children meet the virus and develop immunity, with only a few going on to have the paralytic disease.

However, once the state of sanitation is improved there is not this constant exposure at a young age and, sadly, the rewards for improving the hygiene of the community are the chance of getting polio at an older age, when the incidence of paralytic disease is increased.

This was what happened to perhaps the greatest president there has ever been of the USA, Franklin D. Roosevelt (Fig. 14.1). He contracted polio in 1921 at the age of 39 when he was campaigning for the presidency of James Cox, with himself as vice president. Fortunately, he survived the worst kind of paralysis and went on to complete three terms of office and win the presidency four times, the only person ever to achieve this. It was the greatly improved state of health in the community that had kept him free of infection when he was young, but the polio virus was still circulating and, tragically, he became infected in later life.

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Medium 9781786394583

A Comparison of Attitudes and Coping Strategies of Small Animal Veterinarians Towards Behaviour Problems of Companion Dogs in Israel and Brazil

Denenberg, S. CABI PDF

A Comparison of Attitudes and Coping Strategies of Small

Animal Veterinarians Towards

Behaviour Problems of Companion

Dogs in Israel and Brazil

Yon Alexandre Raileanu1, Liat Baht-Segal2,

Joseph Terkel3 and Noa Harell2*

Faculdades Metropolitanas Unidas University, Sao Paolo, Brazil; 2Hebrew

University, Jerusalem, Israel; 3Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

1

Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Keywords: veterinary behaviour medicine, behaviour problems, companion dogs

Introduction

Over the past three decades, the responsibility for diagnosing and treating

­behavioural disorders of companion animals has been shifting towards the veterinary profession (Mills, 2003; Juarbe-Diaz, 2008; Harell, 2012). To date, many veterinarians still avoid diagnosing and treating many behaviour problems of their patients, and may not apply strict criteria when deciding to refer these

­patients on to other professionals (Hetts et al., 2004; Landsberg et al., 2008).

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5. Consultation to a colleague about managing staff /clinical problems: consultation in action

Robert Bor Karnac Books ePub

Probably the most common situation for internal consultation is a case discussion between colleagues. Through discussion, the consultee attempts a different solution of the problem, without the case being taken over by the consultant, as would appear with a referral. Difficulties over the management of clinical cases are common in hospitals because multi-disciplinary team work does not automatically imply consensus over how best to manage a case. Hospital (and professionals) have rules and guide-lines for problem solving, although these are constantly being tested by developments in biomedicine, medical ethics, management practice and professional practice. Small crises such as an unexpected patient death, change of staff, staff handover, media publicity, strikes and so on may give rise to new difficulties which require problem solving. These may present as interpersonal or interprofessional conflicts. It should be stressed that problems of this kind are a normal and expected occurrence in hospital.

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