564 Chapters
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4 The Social Lives of Poets and Poetry

Zuzanna Olszewska Indiana University Press ePub

It is a Friday early afternoon at Dorr-e Dari, between the weekly poetry reading and criticism session held in the morning, and the afternoon short-story writing class. Some of the poets are still around, catching up with friends, sipping fragrant black tea, rereading their latest poems for any latecomers, and asking for their friends’ informal feedback. More experienced poets give beginners useful tips on how to improve. A female poet and chess champion challenges a male short-story writer to a game of chess in a corner (see fig. 4.1); others head to a nearby park for a round of badminton. A heated debate has emerged in the kitchen, where the smokers have gathered, over whether a poem read in the morning was too provocative in its feminism or not. A group of university students uses one of the back rooms to discuss the upcoming issue of their magazine. The office contains a substantial literary library, and poets can borrow books to brush up on their knowledge of the classics.

There is also a steady stream of visitors. People who have repatriated to Afghanistan but are back in Iran for business or family visits drop by to see old friends and to exchange news and blog addresses. Some bring the latest newspapers or magazines from Afghanistan; many are now involved in media, politics, or education in their homeland. A recent Afghan graduate from an Iranian university comes by to share her good news and distribute pastries to those present. Meanwhile, Mozaffari, after giving a radio interview by telephone, leans back into his office chair and hums a traditional dobeiti (folk quatrain) from his birthplace in the Hazarajat.

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Medium 9780253372048

34. [On Propositions and Syllogisms of Differing Order]

Peirce, Charles S. Indiana University Press PDF

Propositions and Syllogisms, 1881-82

261

By the order of a proposition I mean the number of times it contains the relative p or 'possessor of' (in the sense of an object possessing a quality). Propositions of even orders are either Extensive or Intensive. Those of odd orders have not this distinction.

Propositions of 1st Order.

1-52433

1-52433 1-52433

1-52433 1-52433

1-52433

1-52433

1-52433 1-52433

1-52433 1-52433

1-52433

Syllogisms of the 0-1 Order i.e. those having premises of the 0 and the 1st Order.

Suppose one of the premises is ft-< y or 1 —< fi j y. Then y may

be substituted for ($ in the other premise provided /3 occurs without a dash over it. If in the premise of the first order ft is connected by relative addition; that is if that premise is one of the following

1-52433

1-52433

1-5243

1-52433

1-52433

1-52433

there is no second conclusion. But when ft is connected by multiplication there is a second conclusion. Thus consider the premises

1 -< ft j- y and 1 -< A j- pft. We may write

l-c(A jpf3)(Ply)-

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Medium 9780253021274

6 The Woman, Her Character, Habits, Knowledge, and Behavior toward the People around Her

Vladimir Nalivkin Indiana University Press ePub

IN GENERAL, THE NATIVE woman’s character should be described as lively and extremely merry; naturally, she experiences grief and melancholy from time to time, but she never indulges in them for too long. Even in extremely rough material and moral situations, she is never averse to chatting, laughing, singing a song. Especially when she is young, she sings or hums almost constantly. It is true that occasionally she lets herself get teary eyes, but this tearfulness is always false, insincere, and she uses it as a tool to achieve her goals.

All her movements are quick, sometimes jerky but almost never awkward. From a very early age a girl controls her movements, trying to make them similar to the local standard of propriety. That is the reason why not only most of a woman’s movements but most of her mannerisms are far from being simple or natural. For instance, she loves to walk fast, but respectability based on religion bans her from moving her legs too fast while walking, waving her arms, etc. (Koran, chapter 24, verse 31). That is why her gait has acquired a very special character. She moves her feet very quickly, making tiny steps, while not only her hands but her head and shoulders remain almost motionless or move very little. There is a similar imprint of moderation in her moral “I” as well. Not only the woman but even a ten- or twelve-year-old girl who receives a present that she loves extremely does not express this admiration; often she does not even express gratitude for it. She expresses gratitude only if the present is given as alms or financial assistance. If this is a dress, shoes, or an ornament, the highest degree of her gratitude would be to put it on right away, which would mean that she loved it. (The same is customary among men.) If the present cannot be put on, she shows it to the people around, accompanying it with gestures and a smile so sweet that one of our most experienced coquettes would envy it. We would like to note that many Sart women and girls have reached perfection in expressing their feelings with lips and eyebrows. When she wants to ask a question, she silently raises her brows slightly upward and does it so adroitly that any other question from her becomes unnecessary, because her whole face becomes a perfect expression of a question mark.

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Medium 9780253008053

2. Wiesel as Interpreter of Biblical Narrative

Edited by Steven T Katz and Alan Rosen Indiana University Press ePub

EVERETT FOX

THE HEBREW BIBLE does not exist in and of itself. As an anthology of ancient Israel's literature, as an account of ancient hearers’ past and present, its reality and coherence depend fully on its audience, be they a community or an individual. In that sense it resembles our experience of a work of art. There is no such thing as the Bible any more than there is such a thing, in an abstract sense, as a Beethoven symphony. In that instance, despite the existence and appearance of a musical score, there are only performances, some of them live, some of them recorded, and some of them imagined, that bring the master's creation into the human world of time. We can, to be sure, talk about musical structure, antecedents, tempo, and so on, but these remain in the realm of the analytical, not in the lived experience of the music. Similarly, I would argue, the Bible can be dissected, subject to historical, comparative, philological, and archaeological analysis, but in the end, it is the community of hearers and readers, whether in a liturgical setting, a study group, or the quiet solitude of a study, who put flesh on the bones of the text, and who blow into it the breath of life.

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Medium 9780253329561

Chapter Twenty-One

Scott Russell Sanders Indiana University Press ePub

Patience, patience, Teeg kept reminding herself. You have waited seventeen years, you can wait a few days longer. But she grew more and more edgy as the trip to Portland was delayed, first by rainy weather, then by a series of mishaps at Jonah Colony. While testing dirt samples, Indy cut a finger and fell ill with blood poisoning. She had no sooner recovered than Jurgen came down with a fever, broke out in a rash, and spent three days writhing on his sleepcushion while Hinta and two helpers pinned him down. Soon after his fever broke, Arda discovered all the bluegill floating belly-up in the fish-tanks, casualties of some chemical imbalance, and several people had to go out hunting for wild stock to replace them.

And so departure was put off day by day. Phoenix seemed glad of the delay. “Give you time to think it over,” he told her. She thought of little else. Every kilometer of the route was mapped out. She could visualize each range of hills, each river and thicket, right up to Portland. But there she drew a blank. What would the place look like? When she had first arrived in Portland with her mother, the city had been abandoned for three years. Here and there a roof had caved in, weeds and saplings had burst the pavements, fires had devoured a few old neighborhoods of wooden houses. But most of the city was built of metal and plastic, and so had endured, which was why her mother had been sent there. Dismantling a city, her mother used to say, was like plucking a chicken, and then carving the meat off its bones, and then whittling away at the skeleton. There was very little left of Portland at the end. Since the wooden houses were useless, they were spared along with the brick-paved streets. Most of the stone buildings were framed in steel, which meant they had come down, and the towers came down, wires and pipes were dug up from the ground, every appliance that had not been stolen was melted, thousands of abandoned vehicles were shredded, and the city at last was stripped bare.

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