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3 “Pick on me”

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter three

“Pick on me”

“I can drive any woman in Belgium crazy.”

—Abdelkrim Belachheb quoted from notes cited in trial testimony

I

A

ccording to Interpol Rabat documents, Abdelkrim Belachheb was in Morocco as late as June 21, 1963, when he assaulted and wounded a man in a knife fight. Months later, Interpol Washington has him in Europe at age nineteen. Where he went first and his movements for the next year and a half cannot be established with certainty. Various documents and conflicting testimony have him arriving in either France or Switzerland. There is no indication that his family had helped him to get to Europe or that they even knew where he was. The troubled son could merely have been a fugitive from justice who cared little for the concerns of his family.

While being processed in a Texas prison in 1984, Belachheb indicated that he went first to “Pepignons” in France. In this instance, he may have been telling the truth. During that same interview he admitted that he had lived in Fes from 1958 through 1962, which was consistent with what his father told ABC News in 1985.

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Medium 9781902375014

5.2 Implementation of QA during construction

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 5

A case study of ISO 9000 in large scale projects

5.1 Introduction

Although quality management systems were introduced more than a decade ago in the construction industries of the developed countries (in the United Kingdom, for example), the implementation of quality management systems in some less developed countries is still a relatively new phenomenon.

While quality management systems are now slowly making their presence felt in the less developed countries, there has been a lack of study of the problems faced by practitioners in implementing quality management systems for building projects during their infancy stage in the industry. This vacuum was, likewise, felt in the more developed countries like the United Kingdom when quality management systems were first introduced to their construction industries. This lacuna at the infancy stage means that the lessons and experiences learnt from implementing quality management systems in one particular building project are not necessarily transferred to benefit other projects. Apart from filling this vacuum, the aims of this chapter are to:

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Medium 9781574414325

Chapter 24 – Helping Convicts Stay Out of Prison

Jorge Antonio Renaud The University of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR

helping ex-cons stay out of prison

Why do we kill, or rob, or sell drugs, or write hot checks, or beat up strangers, or abuse and rape women and children? Why are we criminals? Is it because we are poor? Because we were abused ourselves? Because our friends do it? Do our criminal actions arise from need, rage, despair, or simple greed?

I don’t know if anyone can answer these questions. However, once someone is convicted and comes to prison, that person is identified in a way and molded into something he wasn’t before. The guy on the corner who we suspected was “up to no good” is now a full-fledged convict, and a convict trying to stay out after release from prison will face a different set of problems than a young person who is just now breaking the law and has yet to go to prison.

I have no insights to offer those who wish to keep people out of trouble and out of jail. If you are reading this, it is probably too late for that, anyway. What I have to offer is hope—that with your help, your loved one in prison can, upon release, defy the odds and stay out. This may sound strange; hope, and suggestions on how to stay free from a man in for the third time, in the face of cold statistics that show almost sixty percent of all convicts returning to prison.

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Medium 9781574414325

Chapter 1 – Diagnostic

Jorge Antonio Renaud The University of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER ONE

diagnostic

Since October 1, 1849, when a horse thief became the first person to be held in the state’s custody instead of by local law enforcement, Huntsville has been synonymous with Texas prisons. The beautiful town of Huntsville—nestled in the midst of the state’s most lovely forests; four votes from being state capital instead of Austin; adopted home of General Sam Houston—is, nonetheless, by virtue of that first prison, fated to always be linked with prisons in the minds of Texans. That unit, built in what would soon be downtown Huntsville and known as the Walls, also soon included the growing system’s administrative offices. Over a century later, as the system began to expand rapidly, it became obvious that a separate unit was needed as a processing center. The Diagnostic Unit, built in 1964 a few thousand yards from the original Walls, became that intake unit. While there are now other units that may also serve some of the functions as the Diagnostic Unit, (now called the Byrd Unit), it was the first, it remains the most thorough, and it is the one I will use as a model.

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Medium 9781574411522

23 The Echo

Jorge Antonio Renaud University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter twenty-three

the echo

T

he Echo is the Texas Prison Newspaper—our newspaper. It is tabloid-sized and published every month or two, then distributed via truck mail to the units and then to the living quarters. The Echo has been published more or less continuously since 1928 and has a circulation of

100,000 or so, giving it some standing among Texas papers.

The Echo’s contents can be divided into three types of articles: reprints of penal-related stores written for other papers; occasional columns or editorials written by the Echo’s staff; and recognition-type pieces: graduation notices, results of sports tournaments, and similar short articles submitted by inmates.

There is a Letters to the Editor page, and an advice column written by a mystery convict. This columnist, who like Madonna and Elvis has reached first-name status—Dear Darby—offers sarcastic and hilarious advice to letters that are genuine but often sound made-up. His column is a tradition and undoubtedly the most-read part of any given issue.

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Medium 9780870819506

5. Tributary Water

P. Andrew Jones University Press of Colorado ePub

There are four fundamental categories of water and associated water rights in Colorado: (1) Tributary Water, (2) Non-Tributary and Not Non-Tributary Groundwater, (3) Designated Groundwater, and (4) Exempt Wells. These categories can be perceived as a rule with three exceptions. As a general rule, all water in the state of Colorado, above ground or underground, is assumed to be tributary—connected to and contributing to a natural surface stream. Exceptions to this general rule are Non-Tributary and Not Non-Tributary Groundwater, Designated Groundwater, and Exempt Wells. This chapter discusses the first category—Tributary Water—in depth. Chapters 6, 7, and 8 discuss Non-Tributary and Not Non-Tributary Ground-water, Designated Groundwater, and Exempt Wells, respectively. In describing each legal category of water, a “key characteristics” section is included for ease of reference. (See Appendix, p. 257.) Following the key characteristics section, the reader will find a series of “critical issues”—areas of understanding that are essential to a working knowledge of the category. After reading Chapters 5–8, the reader should be able to identify the fundamental category of any water right encountered, understand the set of rules governing the use of that right, and identify critical issues related to the use and administration of the water right.

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Medium 9781902375014

7.3 Importance of quality costs

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 7

A system for quantifying construction quality costs

7.1 Introduction

There are three components that make up quality costs: Prevention, Appraisal and Failure costs. The ISO 9000 standard introduces a quality management system that has been widely claimed would reduce the costs of business. One of the ways it does this is through a reduction in quality costs. The ISO 9000 quality management system establishes work procedures that reduce defects. Proper design and implementation of these work procedures lead to reduced wastage as more work would be done right the first time. Ultimately, the costs of operation would decrease. However, no study has been done based on the above premise. Although it has been widely claimed that ISO 9000 would reduce the costs of doing business, no studies have been undertaken within the context of ISO 9000 certified construction firms. Due to this vacuum, this chapter proposes a cost system to capture site quality costs. The aims of this chapter are to:

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Medium 9780870819506

2. Early Water Use and Development

P. Andrew Jones University Press of Colorado ePub

Chapter 1 provided a summary of Colorado’s physical resources—the canvas on which the human drama of water law unfolds. From the earliest times, Colorado residents have depended on the region’s capricious streams to develop cultures, customs, and laws that facilitate humankind’s interaction with the environment and provide a vehicle for the distribution of Colorado’s scarce water resources. This chapter traces humankind’s interaction with Colorado’s water resources from 10,000 B.C. to the present. It examines the lives and cultures of the state’s earliest residents and how they interacted with their natural environment. It traces the broad historical outlines of early European settlement, statehood, and the development of water usage during these formative periods. Finally, it examines selected current situations that highlight the evolving nature of humankind’s interaction with Colorado’s landscape. It is a historical tour of the Colorado landscape, laying the foundation for specific lessons in water law in later chapters.

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Medium 9781902375014

3.1 Introduction

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 3

Managing change under ISO 9000

3.1 Introduction

An effective quality management system is one which adopts customer-oriented strategies and has an organisational form which can respond efficiently to customer preference. It should also encourage innovations - new technologies, new markets, new customer applications of existing products, new products, new organisational forms, new requirements for entrepreneurial activities - and be flexible enough to meet social and economic changes in the environment. The improvement of existing quality management systems through flexibility and innovation will increase product and service quality. This will in turn enhance and advance the organisation’s business objective.

The “segmentalist” and “integrative” concepts are examined in this chapter using detailed case studies of two construction firms. These should be removed from or implemented into the organisation where necessary. Organisations must adopt the “integrative” approach which looks ahead to the challenges of the future rather than the “segmentalist” approach which is contented with past accomplishments. A corporate renaissance must be created within the organisation to take on these challenges and implement change and innovation. It is therefore necessary to develop the humanistic factors and a “participatory management” environment. However, in so doing, the technical aspects are also of importance and should not be totally ignored. These are collectively the key elements to maintaining a quality management system effectively.

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Medium 9780253001924

2 The Constitutional Foundations of the “Preclearance” Process: How Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act Was Enforced, 1965–2005

Daniel McCool Indiana University Press ePub

In July 2006, Congress adopted a revision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act that reauthorized the “preclearance” requirements set forth in Section 5 for another twenty-five years and amended the legal standards to be applied in its enforcement, restoring the standards for assessing the purpose and effect of voting changes that had been altered by two recent Supreme Court decisions.1 Section 5 is often regarded as one of the act’s two most powerful provisions.2 In the preclearance process jurisdictions covered by Section 5, for the most part states of the former Confederacy, must obtain federal approval of voting changes, either from a three-judge panel in the District of Columbia or from the Department of Justice, before these changes become legally enforceable. Approval requires proof by the jurisdiction that the change “does not have the purpose and will not have the effect of denying or abridging the right to vote on account of race or color.”3 Shortly after its adoption the Supreme Court ruled that Section 5, like the rest of the act, was constitutional. “Congress concluded that the unsuccessful remedies which it had prescribed in the past would have to be replaced by sterner and more elaborate measures,” wrote Chief Justice Earl Warren.4 Twice since then the Court has upheld the constitutionality of Section 5, as amended.5

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Medium 9781574414325

Appendix B – Medical/Dental Services

Jorge Antonio Renaud The University of North Texas Press ePub

APPENDIX B

Medical and Dental Services Offered TDCJ Inmates

I. Primary Care

This is the inmate’s first point of contact with the health care system. This level offers medical care for the large number of conditions that frequently occur in the population and which do not require sophisticated technical capability to diagnose or treat. This level also provides for the triage and referral of patients to the secondary level, which offers more specialized diagnostic procedures and treatment. All units in the TDCJ-ID offer at least primary care.

Services provided:

A. Self-care—personal hygiene and care for a condition that can be self-treated.

B. First aid services—services for a minor condition that can be treated with over-the-counter products by uncredentialed person trained in first aid.

C. Basic Ambulatory Clinic Outpatient Services:

1. Medical services offered:

a) medication administration

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Medium 9781574413175

Appendix One: The Rest of the Tragic Story of Hugh D. Spencer

Bill Neal University of North Texas Press PDF

APPENDIX ONE

The Rest of the Tragic Story of Hugh D. Spencer

Miss Lillie Was a Rover

HUGH D. SPENCER was the district attorney who prosecuted Beech

Epting and John Beal Sneed for the murder of Al Boyce, Jr. The Epting trial began on January 4, 1913. Some seven years later almost to the day—January 5, 1920—Hugh Spencer was a central figure in another sensational murder trial, this time in Decatur, Texas. The local newspaper, the Wise County Messenger, called the trial “one of the strangest in the annals of criminal jurisprudence.”1 It certainly lived up to its billing.

Although John Beal Sneed had no direct connection with the

1920 Decatur killing and its resulting murder trial, nevertheless the bizarre story of that killing and the murder trial begs to be told as a part of—and not merely as a footnote to—the equally bizarre Sneed story. While Spencer played a role in each, that was only the beginning of the similarities. The killings, the murder trials, the reactions of the jurors as well as the mind-set of the society of that time and place were almost a mirror image of each other. Eerily enough, the killing in the Decatur case was an identical twin, factually, to the assassination of Al Boyce, Jr.: a killer who fired three shots into his unsuspecting victim; a killer who readily admitted that he shot his victim with intent to kill; a killer who never denied that he shot his victim without a warning and without giving him a chance to defend himself; and a killer who was immediately identified and arrested.

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Medium 9781902375014

7.8 Proposed construction quality costs quantifying system (CQCQS)

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 7

A system for quantifying construction quality costs

7.1 Introduction

There are three components that make up quality costs: Prevention, Appraisal and Failure costs. The ISO 9000 standard introduces a quality management system that has been widely claimed would reduce the costs of business. One of the ways it does this is through a reduction in quality costs. The ISO 9000 quality management system establishes work procedures that reduce defects. Proper design and implementation of these work procedures lead to reduced wastage as more work would be done right the first time. Ultimately, the costs of operation would decrease. However, no study has been done based on the above premise. Although it has been widely claimed that ISO 9000 would reduce the costs of doing business, no studies have been undertaken within the context of ISO 9000 certified construction firms. Due to this vacuum, this chapter proposes a cost system to capture site quality costs. The aims of this chapter are to:

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574411522

Appendix B Medical and Dental Services Offered TDCJ Inmates

Jorge Antonio Renaud University of North Texas Press PDF

Appendix B

Medical and Dental Services

Offered TDCJ Inmates

I. Primary Care

This is the inmate’s first point of contact with the health care system.

This level offers medical care for the large number of conditions that frequently occur in the population and which do not require sophisticated technical capability to diagnose or treat. This level also provides for the triage and referral of patients to the secondary level, which offers more specialized diagnostic procedures and treatment. All units in the

TDCJ-ID offer at least primary care.

Services provided:

A. Self-care—personal hygiene and care for a condition that can be self-treated.

B. First aid services—services for a minor condition that can be treated with over-the-counter products by uncredentialed person trained in first aid.

C. Basic Ambulatory Clinic Outpatient Services:

1. Medical services offered: a) medication administration b) screening physical exams c) immunizations d) personal health and hygiene counseling e) nutrition counseling f) basic history and physical exams and evaluation g) diagnosis and treatment of simple illnesses and minor injuries h) specimen collection and basic laboratory procedures i) basic radiology services (chest, abdomen, KUB, extremities) j) eyeglass fittings k) EKGs l) Basic respiratory therapy services

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Medium 9781902375014

3.3 The technical approach

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 3

Managing change under ISO 9000

3.1 Introduction

An effective quality management system is one which adopts customer-oriented strategies and has an organisational form which can respond efficiently to customer preference. It should also encourage innovations - new technologies, new markets, new customer applications of existing products, new products, new organisational forms, new requirements for entrepreneurial activities - and be flexible enough to meet social and economic changes in the environment. The improvement of existing quality management systems through flexibility and innovation will increase product and service quality. This will in turn enhance and advance the organisation’s business objective.

The “segmentalist” and “integrative” concepts are examined in this chapter using detailed case studies of two construction firms. These should be removed from or implemented into the organisation where necessary. Organisations must adopt the “integrative” approach which looks ahead to the challenges of the future rather than the “segmentalist” approach which is contented with past accomplishments. A corporate renaissance must be created within the organisation to take on these challenges and implement change and innovation. It is therefore necessary to develop the humanistic factors and a “participatory management” environment. However, in so doing, the technical aspects are also of importance and should not be totally ignored. These are collectively the key elements to maintaining a quality management system effectively.

See All Chapters

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