9 Chapters
Medium 9781626567856

5 Best Advice in the Business

Burke, Fauzia Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Our goals can only be reached through a vehicle of a plan, in which we must fervently believe, and upon which we must vigorously act. There is no other route to success.
Pablo Picasso

In the first few chapters, we spent time getting to know your dreams and goals. To make them a reality, we now need a solid plan and some good advice from people who do this work well.

To help you craft the right online marketing mix and to ensure that the conversations you start with your readers are effective, I tapped into the collective intelligence of book publishing professionals and asked: What is the one marketing tip you would give to authors? Here is what they said:

Know your readers: “Nothing works all the time, or for everyone. It’s important for authors to leave no stone unturned and consider how social media can work for them, but also important to consider the whole picture of getting the word out about their book and reaching readers. I’m sure there are examples of authors whose success is directly related to their social media strategy and efforts. But there also are authors whose success has come mostly without that. Without diving too deeply into it, I think there are different kinds of readers who use and don’t use social media in different ways. When there’s a match between an author’s efforts and the potential readers they are reaching, that can be magic. But when there isn’t, a lot of energy can go to waste. Things are always changing in the social media world. The best advice I can give is to write the best book you can and reassess your social media involvement/strategy often.”

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Medium 9781622500291

A Cook in the Kitchen

Saddleback Educational Publishing Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

name

_________________________________________

date ____________________________

A COOK IN THE KITCHEN

A. The following verbs are things a cook might do when preparing a

meal. Find and circle the verbs in the hidden words puzzle. They may go up, down, across, backward, or diagonally. Check off each word as you find it.

___ beat

___ puree

___ blend

___ slice

___ carve

___ stir

___ chop

___ swirl

___ dice

___ whip

___ mince

___ whisk

___ pound

___ grate

G R A T E D I C E

B M A B T B P V S

L P U R E E R P L

E R M R C A A O I

N M I N C E T U C

D T B W O C M N E

S W I R L H I D D

W H I S K O S I O

L P W H I P T A C

B. Read the nouns that name kitchen tools. After each name, write a verb (such as mix, cut, grind, etc.) to tell what job the tool will do.

Hint: Some tools may do more than one job.

1. blender

______________________________

2. beater 5. grater

______________________________ ____________________________

3. whisk 6. mallet

_____________________________ ____________________________

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Medium 9781574416367

The “Boys” in the Bunkhouse

Gayle Reaves, Editor UNT Press ePub
Medium 9781574416367

Then the Walls Closed In

Gayle Reaves, Editor UNT Press ePub
Medium 9780253007452

6 The Message in Hand

Michael Lempert Indiana University Press ePub

 

That politicians can sway audiences through gesture is an old conceit, as the writings of the first-century Roman rhetorician Quintilian, for instance, attest. Quintilian offered copious advice on how orators should use their hands and manage their bodies, and made it sound as if these signs had stable meanings and predictable effects: “To strike the thigh, a gesture which Cleon is supposed to have first practiced at Athens, is not only common, but suits the expression of indignant feeling and excites the attention of the audience” (Book 11: 374). The contemporary scholarly literature on gesture has had precious little to say about this venerable subject, and what has been said has been eclipsed by a mass of op-ed-styled musings by journalists and political commentators, with the occasional cameo played by the more sober, if often dubiously trained, “body language expert.” These musings range from the waggish (e.g., a shot at Sen. John McCain’s “twitchy finger air quotes” [Muller 2008]) to the incendiary (e.g., accusations that Obama slyly flipped off Hillary Clinton in April 2008 when he scratched his cheek with his middle finger [Malcolm 2008]). And there’s always ample satire, like the Huffington Post’s Matt Mendelsohn’s piece from late October 2008, which poked fun at McCain’s proclivity for air quotes: “McCain Injures Fingers Making Quotation Marks Sign, Suspends Campaign.” “Today,” complains Jürgen Streeck in one of the few, careful case studies of political gesture, “most publicized pronouncements on the matter have the quality of pop psychology or pop ethology: Unconscious motives or psychological dispositions are attributed, often on the basis of a single photograph, and universal meanings of isolated behaviors are invoked, in statements that are sometimes witty, but rarely enlightening” (2008, 155).

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