235 Chapters
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Medium 9781574416367

Dangerous Minds/Insane System: The Virginian-Pilot / By Joanne Kimberlin and Janie Bryant

Gayle Reaves, Editor UNT Press PDF

Dangerous Minds/Insane System

The Virginian-Pilot

April 27, 2014

By Joanne Kimberlin and Janie Bryant

Part 1 of 3

Bruce Williams couldn't sleep. It was after midnight and quiet in his

Portsmouth apartment complex.

Quiet, except for the voices in his head.

He'd told people about them—the way they shrieked for violence, his fear they'd win.

It's all there in his records. In the long lists of diagnoses, including schizophrenia. In the ominous references to homicidal thoughts. In at least 20 warnings, relayed by Williams himself.

Those voices had led him to kill before.

There was a time when someone like that would have been locked up in a mental institution.

Not anymore.

200

Best American Newspaper Narratives, Vol. 3

On that restless winter night in 2011, Williams lay down, but the voices would give him no peace. He left his apartment, walked down the hall, stepped into the elevator and pushed No. 4.

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Medium 9781574411713

4: The Repeal of Bilingual Education 2001

Guadalupe San Miguel Jr. University of North Texas Press PDF

THE FINAL PUSH, 1990S

87

spending for the 2002 fiscal year that began October 1, a roughly $7 billion increase over 2001. It set up a comprehensive testing system to identity failing schools and needy students. It also stipulated that failing schools would receive resources to get them back on track, and that students could be offered the option of transferring to another public school or could get tutoring or other supplemental services.36

On January 8, 2002, President Bush signed the No Child Left Behind

Act of 2001 (H.R. 1) into law.37 This legislation amended and reauthorized the ESEA for the next six years. It also reauthorized the BEA of

1994. The former bilingual education act, known as Title VII of the

ESEA, is now Title III of the No Child Left Behind Act. Its official title is

“Language Instruction for Limited English Proficient and Immigrant

Children.”

THE REPEAL OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION, 2001

Title III represents a major overhaul of federal programs for the education of English Language Learners, or as the Bush administration calls them, limited English proficient and recent immigrant students. More particularly, it officially repeals bilingual education and replaces it with an English-only piece of legislation.

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Medium 9781574411713

3: Conclusion

Guadalupe San Miguel Jr. University of North Texas Press PDF

70

CONTESTED POLICY

and on the amount of non-English languages one could use in bilingual education (less than half a day; less than one hour per day). Ironically, while they limited the types of students who could enroll in bilingual education programs, opponents expanded the coverage to include the diverse groups of immigrants coming to this country, especially those from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Asia.65

Although all of these changes impacted the character of bilingual education, none was more significant than the redefinition of this policy allowing the funding of English-only alternatives to native language instruction. In 1978 only bilingual education programs were fundable.66

In 1984, federal policy allowed an English-only alternative to native language instruction.67 Officially, five programs were fundable. Three of these were instructional programs for LEP children: Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE), Developmental Bilingual Education (DBE), and

Special Alternative Instructional Programs (SAIP). The first two allowed for native language instruction; the latter did not. In defense of the program, supporters of bilingual education managed to insert a provision stipulating that only ten percent of total funds for this policy could be used for this English-only method.68 In 1988 this policy was amended to allow up to twenty-five percent of total bilingual education funds for establishing English-only instructional programs. The amended bill also stipulated that one hundred percent of any new funds above $130 million had to be devoted to English-only methods.69

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Medium 9781574411713

2: Transformation of Policy

Guadalupe San Miguel Jr. University of North Texas Press PDF

CHAPTER 2

THE EXPANSION OF BILINGUAL

EDUCATION, 1968–1978

INTRODUCTION

During the first decade of its existence, from 1968 to 1978, bilingual education policy was strengthened and transformed as it was implemented.

Federal court rulings, executive actions, and the political struggles of minority and non-minority group members contributed to its growth and strengthening.

The proponents of bilingual education constantly struggled for funds, created the administrative mechanisms for encouraging the establishment of bilingual education programs, provided definitions of and clashed over the goals and content of bilingual education, and developed a federal support system for its implementation. These developments led to a variety of programmatic, educational, and political changes and to the transformation in the goals, scope, and character of bilingual education. They also led to the emergence of an organized opposition to bilingual education policy.

TRANSFORMATION OF POLICY

Expand Scope of Legislation: From Categorical to

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Medium 9781622500291

Job Training 1

Saddleback Educational Publishing Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

name

_________________________________________

date ____________________________

JOB TRAINING I

A. The words in the box relate to training

for a job. Find each word in the puzzle.

It may go up, down, across, backward, or diagonally. Check off each word as you circle it in the puzzle.

___ apprenticeship

___ intern

___ experience ___ aide

___ on-the-job

___ skilled

___ instructions

___ trainee

___ demonstrated

___ mentor

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B. Complete the following passage with vocabulary words from Part A.

Some of the letters have been provided as clues.

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This summer, Adam will be an __ __ __ at Channel 4, the local television station. The opportunity gives Adam a chance to get the __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ he needs to someday become a TV news reporter.

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Medium 9781622500291

Jury Duty

Saddleback Educational Publishing Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

name

_________________________________________

date ____________________________

JURY DUTY

Is the defendant guilty or not guilty? A jury is a group of citizens chosen to listen to evidence in a trial and to reach a decision. As a U.S. citizen, you might someday be called to serve on a jury. Here are some words you would need to know.

A. Find the hidden words in the puzzle.

Words may go up, down, across, backward, or diagonally. When you circle a word on the puzzle, check it off the vocabulary list.

___ courtroom

___ foreman

___ duty

___ deliberate

___ verdict

___ panel

___ sequester

___ jury box

___ peers

___ unanimous

___ guilty

___ trial

___ innocent

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B. Complete the following poem with words from Part A. Use the first letters and the rhyming pattern as clues.

TRIAL BY JURY  

He’d hired a slick lawyer

Known as Rudy the Fox.

Now Rudy smiled as he stood by the court  j_________ b________.

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Medium 9781574411713

4: Conclusion

Guadalupe San Miguel Jr. University of North Texas Press PDF

THE FINAL PUSH, 1990S

93

Given that state governments are likely to experience budget deficits over the next several years while the number of ELLs continues to grow we approach this shift in policy with caution. Unless the schools receive increased resources to serve these additional ELLs, then the funds could end up being spread too thinly among schools to be effective. Thus, we believe that proper implementation of this legislation means that the Congress and the Bush Administration must close the loop by providing states the resources and technical assistance they need to provide ELLs with a quality education. In addition, they must more effectively monitor implementation of the program to ensure that the states are able to meet the ambitious goal.45

CONCLUSION

The passage of this bill means that after several decades of attacking and undermining this policy the opponents have finally succeeded in repealing bilingual education and in replacing it with an English-only one. The forces of conservatism, assimilation, and ignorance, in other words, have triumphed over pluralism and over enlightened pedagogy. Is this, then, the beginning of the end for bilingualism in the United States or is this only a temporary setback? Nobody really knows at this point. But if history is any guide, we are bound to see the clash between contending groups with competing notions of assimilation, ethnicity, empowerment, social change, and pedagogy continue and probably escalate in the years ahead. Contestation and contradiction have and will continue to shape the content of school language policies in the years to come for they are central to the policy development process. It might be appropriate here to end this history with the words of Josué M. González, one of the most important and influential advocates of bilingual education in the nation. Recently, in reflecting on the demise of federal bilingual education policy and on the federal government’s support for this policy, he noted that this temporary setback will not have a dampening effect on bilingualism or on dual language instruction. In the wake of this demise,

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Medium 9781626567856

4 Get Real With Your Goals

Burke, Fauzia Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

People with clear, written goals accomplish far more in a shorter period of time than people without them could ever imagine.
Brian Tracy

There is an old joke that’s been circling around the book publishing world since the 1930s.

Q: How do you make a small fortune in book publishing?
A: You start with a large one.

Book publishing is a labor of love for everyone. Yes, some authors make it big and get rich, but the rest of us work in book publishing because we love the written word. For every one of my clients publishing a book is a dream come true. Readers buying your book and absorbing your words is really a magical thing. To make your dreams a reality, we need to work on a plan.

You’ve spent time learning about online branding and why it is important. You have captured your dreams and refined your understanding of your readers. Now it’s time to take all that thinking and turn it into concrete, clear goals that can make your dreams into a reality.

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Medium 9781622500291

Caring for Family Pets

Saddleback Educational Publishing Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

name

_________________________________________

date ____________________________

CARING FOR FAMILY PETS

Practice using synonyms (words with similar meanings) as context clues. Notice the boldfaced vocabulary word in the first sentence of each item.

Then circle a synonym for that word in the second sentence. The first item has been done as a model.

1. Tehmeena takes her dog and two cats to Dr. Tan, the veterinarian.

The animal doctor tries to make each visit a good experience.

2. Sometimes Dr. Tan must give the pets their vaccinations. These injections protect against disease.

3. Tehmeena knows her pets must be obedient. If they are well-behaved, she can take them places without worrying.

4. When Bingo the dog follows commands, Tehmeena gives him a reward. This prize is usually a dog biscuit or a romp in the park.

5. Tehmeena spends lots of money on flea control products. Those pests can bite not only dogs and cats, but family members as well.

6. The dog and the cats all wear collars. ID tags and licenses hang from their neckbands.

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Medium 9780253357137

Part 4. Prehistories of an Apex Predator

Edited by Genese Marie Sodikoff Indiana University Press ePub

Laurie R. Godfrey and Emilienne Rasoazanabary

This chapter results from the collaborative efforts of Laurie Godfrey, a primate paleontologist, and Emilienne Rasoazanabary, a specialist on the behavior of living nonhuman primates. Both of us study the primates that live or once lived on the island of Madagascar—lemurs. In this chapter, we examine extinction, taking as our example recent extinctions on Madagascar (including the extinction of giant lemurs) and threats to the smaller-bodied lemur species that remain there today. Extinctions can be viewed in deep time, in near time, or in today’s world; each view generates insights that cannot be gained from any of the others. A “deep time” perspective is usually reserved for extinctions that occurred before humans evolved, so humans cannot have been responsible. There have periodically been major mass extinctions in the past (called extinction “events” because of the unusually high number of species extinctions concentrated in relatively short periods of time), each with different but profound effects on the evolutionary history of life on Earth. Quaternary extinctions, “extinctions in near time,” demand a consideration of humans as at least possible agents of extermination (MacPhee 1999). It was during the very last part (the most recent 100,000 years) of the geological period called the Quaternary (or Pleistocene and Holocene) that people began to populate many regions that had never before experienced their presence, and these regions, one after the other, suffered dramatic species loss. In many ways, such “near-time” extinctions rivaled or surpassed some of the worst mass extinctions of the distant past, and tools that have been applied to the analysis of species rarefaction in the deep past have been applied as well to late Quaternary extinctions.

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Medium 9781622500291

At the Supermarket 1

Saddleback Educational Publishing Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

name

_________________________________________

date ____________________________

AT THE SUPERMARKET I

A. Who’s who at the supermarket? Read

the list of supermarket employees on the left. Write a letter by each number to match the employees with the things they use or manage.

1. _____ checker

a. meat

2. _____ carry-out person

b. flowers

3. _____ store manager

c. cash register

4. _____ butcher

d. customers and personnel

5. _____ produce manager

e. fruits and vegetables

6. _____ baker

f. prescription drugs

7. _____ florist

g. bread, pies, cakes

8. _____ pharmacist

h. shopping carts and bags of groceries

B. Supermarket ads aim to make products sound appealing. Match

each descriptive phrase with the product it best describes. Write a letter after each number.

1. _____ hen laid

a. produce

2. _____ ranch raised

b. beef

3. _____ freshly baked

c. bread

4. _____ sweet and ripe

d. eggs

5. _____ dairy fresh

e. milk

6. _____ nursery grown

f. customer service

7. _____ friendly and helpful

g. flowers

CHALLENGE!  Think of five items you often buy at

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Medium 9781626560475

THREE OOPS!

Hough, Karen Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

There’s a great concept in improvisation. It’s called “Oops to Eureka!” On the improv stage — heck, on any stage — things go wrong sometimes. Or they change, not in a worrisome way, but an unexpected way. “Oops” is the response when we realize something unexpected has happened. The key is to make those instances become “Eurekas” rather than disasters. This might require quite a change in mindset for many people. It’s hard not to minimize or walk away from our Oops moments. In improv, we’re not allowed to ignore the unexpected. We’re obligated to acknowledge it and keep it in the show. In reality, the unexpected is improv’s stock in trade. Even within our own troupes, we’re constantly trying to surprise each other with unexpected suggestions and scenes.

Scientists do the same thing: they never assume to know the outcome; they embrace “mistakes” or the unexpected as fully as they do the predictable. The questions become “What wonderful thing will happen now that the agenda has flown out the window?” “What discovery will be made?”

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8 Translating Oral Literature in Indigenous Societies: Ethnic Aesthetic Performances in Multicultural and Multilingual Settings

Edited by Paul V Kroskrity and Anthony Indiana University Press ePub

Sean Patrick O’Neill

IN MANY WAYS, the process of translation is one of the most fundamental concerns within the field of anthropology (Becker 1995; Rubel and Rosman 2003). Even at the outset, one must question the extent to which translation is possible when passing—as anthropologists so often do—between distant and often unrelated languages and cultures. What happens to words and other elements of discourse as they are lifted from one social context and placed in another language, far from the living subjects who once animated these utterances? When it comes to writing up these encounters, every anthropologist is faced with the daunting task of representing these remote worlds of experience in “plain English” or some kind of academic jargon as we attempt to recreate field interactions in new contexts, for audiences who may not share the same cultural background or even speak the same language as the original consultants. Thus, in a deep and abiding way, one wonders how much is lost in the process of translation once the anthropologist departs from the original language and the context of shared life experiences.

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Taking a Taxi

Saddleback Educational Publishing Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

name

_________________________________________

date ____________________________

TAKING A TAXI

Taxicab, taxi, and cab are all words that mean a car that carries passengers for a fare.

SPEEDY CAB

A. Notice the boldfaced word in each sentence. Then circle a letter to

show how each sentence should be completed.

1. A passenger who hails a cab is

3. The taxicab dispatcher does the job of a. getting the driver’s attention by calling out and/or raising a hand.

a. scheduling and sending out cabs. b. throwing water on the car.

b. driving a cab. c. paying the driver for the ride. c. washing and repairing the cabs.

2. When taxi drivers say “the meter is running,” they mean a. someone is chasing the cab

because they need a ride.

b. the radiator is leaking water. c. a device is turned on to record how long the ride is lasting.

4. When a cab company charges a flat rate, a passenger can expect to pay a. by the minute. b. nothing. c. a pre-set price for a certain trip.

B. The vocabulary words in this activity are adjectives that might

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Medium 9780253019417

1 Reinventing Ethnopoetics

Edited by Paul V Kroskrity and Anthony Indiana University Press ePub

LISTENING FOR VOICES

Robert Moore

ASSESSING THE LEGACY of Dell Hymes (1927–2009) in ethnopoetics should entail assessing ethnopoetics more broadly, as a “legacy” in its own right within American cultural and linguistic anthropology since the 1960s. For indeed, ethnopoetics in the broad sense emerged more as a movement than as another subfield of (linguistic) anthropology, and it emerged at the same time and among the same generational cohort that produced Reinventing Anthropology (Hymes 1972), “the ‘anti-textbook’ of anthropology’s then mid-career political Left” (Silverstein 2010, 935). Like Reinventing Anthropology, ethnopoetics—the term was coined in 1968 by Jerome Rothenberg (Quasha 1976, 65)—emerged in the context of a generational struggle between practitioners working in a number of different but overlapping fields of inquiry and expressive practice: academic anthropology, folklore, literary criticism, poetry, and what we now call performance art. Today we are separated from this period by at least two (demographic) generations, hence the need to ask, in the conclusion below, what parts of this legacy are still usable and active for students of narrative and other discourse practices today.

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