438 Slices
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781615424290

Customize Your Reading Environment

Sharon Zardetto Take Control Books ePub

Whether youre reading at home or on a commuter train, sitting up during the daytime or lounging around at night, you can set up your iBooks environment for a comfortable reading experience. From text size, font, and page color to how you turn pages, you can choose your default comfort settings and easily adjust them when circumstances change.

At least, you can when youre reading standard EPUBs. Advanced EPUBs (described in The Ever-evolving EPUB, much earlier), PDFs, and Multi-Touch books are pretty much set in cement visually, so you cant, for instance, change their fonts or page color.

This chapter also looks at environmental aspects, such as how to Adjust the Brightness, that apply to all ebook formats.

Before you can follow some of the directions in this chapter, youll need to know how to access the basic controls for a book window or screen, so lets take a look.

The minimalist iBooks reading environment shows just the text and discreet gray necessities such as the book title and page number. On the Mac, even the windows standard Close, Minimize, and Zoom buttons are hollow gray circles instead of the usual red, yellow, and green.

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Medium 9781442265790

Note from the Field

Collections ePub

Sophie White

Associate Professor of American Studies, Concurrent Associate Professor, Dept. of Africana Studies and Dept. of History, University of Notre Dame, 1042 Flanner Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556; swhite1@nd.edu

I write as the digitization project for the Louisiana Colonial Documents Database (LCDD) nears completion. And as I do so, I recall the huge wave of relief that swept over me when I first heard that these extraordinary documents were scanned, and were now safe, permanently. For an archive housed in New Orleans, that is no small thing—as Hurricane Katrina so rudely reminded us. As I saw for myself the exceptional quality of the digitization, and how technology can magnify documents to facilitate deciphering, my thoughts meandered to the significance of this achievement for historians like me: unfettered access to a signal collection of national and international importance.

This astoundingly rich archive is quite simply a historian’s dream, because of the range of information contained within the collection, about economic, political, religious, and social events for example, found within documents ranging from business records, to marriage contracts, and criminal investigations. But it is in the evidence pertaining to the lives of the non-literate that this archive stands out, allowing us—and indeed nudging us—to re-interpret the experience of non-elites and of women, not least through the courtroom testimony of enslaved individuals (the scope of which is unique in any North American archive).

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Medium 9780253007452

5 Unflipping the Flop

Michael Lempert Indiana University Press ePub

CHERYL OTIS: Senator Kerry, after talking with several co-workers and family and friends, I asked the ones who said they were not voting for you, “Why?” They said that you were too wishy-washy. Do you have a reply for them?

JOHN KERRY: Yes, I certainly do. (laughter)

—8 October 2004. Second presidential debate, held at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri

On 30 October 2007, more than two months before the primaries began, the Democratic Party held a televised debate in Philadelphia for seven of its presidential hopefuls, which included then front-runner New York senator Hillary Clinton (New York Times 2007). At a certain moment, as recounted in chapter 3, Clinton was pressed about her view on governor of New York Eliot Spitzer’s beleaguered proposal to issue driver’s licenses to illegal immigrants. “It makes a lot of sense,” she was quoted as saying of his plan in New Hampshire. In response to the debate’s co-moderator Tim Russert, her answer this time around seemed more measured: two parts sympathy (“what Governor Spitzer is trying to do is to fill the vacuum”) and one part disapproval (“we need to get back to comprehensive immigration reform because no state, no matter how well-intentioned, can fill this gap”). Sen. Chris Dodd, one of the seven candidates on stage, read Clinton’s sympathy as tacit agreement with Spitzer’s position, and she swiftly corrected him: “I just want to add, I did not say that it should be done, but I certainly recognize why Governor Spitzer is trying to do it.” With this John Edwards and Barack Obama resumed the evening’s grating refrain: that Clinton was inconsistent, that her inconsistency bespoke a lack of conviction. This was arguably what people in the industry call a “moment,” a turning point in a candidate’s fortunes. In post-debate coverage on the political talk show Hardball, Joe Trippi, senior strategist for the Edwards campaign, ratcheted up the criticism, attributing Clinton’s shifting positions to whether she was in “primary mode or general election mode” and predicting that her position would change again once she spoke with her consultants (MSNBC 2007a). It was left to the commentariat to name the charge against Clinton, as editorialist Michael Graham (2007) of the Boston Herald did in an uncharitable opinion piece published two days after the debate:

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Medium 9781622500246

To the Student

Emily Hutchinson Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

Lesson

1

Using Vivid Nouns

Nouns are words that name persons, places, things, or events. Good writers choose nouns that are specific rather than general. The word dog, for example, does not give the reader an exact mental picture. A specific noun such as whippet, greyhound,

Dalmatian, or cocker spaniel would create a much more precise image.

A. Rewrite each sentence, replacing the underlined word with a more specific noun that creates a clearer picture.

1. Please pass the vegetables.

__________________________________________________________________________

2. We went to a restaurant for dinner on Saturday.

__________________________________________________________________________

3. After dinner, we split a dessert.

__________________________________________________________________________

4. Patrick bought a new car.

__________________________________________________________________________

5. Jean lives in a place with an ocean view.

__________________________________________________________________________

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Medium 9781935249801

Chapter 4: Creating Information: Production in Literacy 2.0

Nancy Frey Solution Tree Press ePub

“What’s ‘New Literacies’? What was wrong with the old ones?” We overheard this comment at a reading conference not too long ago and couldn’t help but smile at the automatic assumption that new things always replace old things. While that may be true with some tools (after all, no one longs for an eight-track tape player), it is not true with functions. As we discussed in the introduction, the tools are going to continue to change with breathtaking speed. Even as we write this, we are fretting about our ability to keep current with technological developments. But we breathe a sigh of relief when we remind ourselves that the functions are timeless. The need to acquire, produce, and share information transcends the latest gadget or software.

Donald Leu and his colleagues acknowledge that new literacies (lowercase) can embrace a number of different areas, including informational literacy, discourse, reading comprehension, and learning strategies (Leu, O’Byrne, Zawilinski, McVerry, & Everett-Cacopardo, 2009). As they note, each of these new literacies (lowercase) draws from a variety of funds of knowledge that are informing our understanding as educators who are preparing learners in the 21st century. They offer four dimensions that collectively provide a working definition of New Literacies (uppercase):

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Medium 9781442276147

The Creation and Evolution of the Transcription Center, Smithsonian Institution’s Digital Volunteer Platform

Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Creation and Evolution of the Transcription Center, Smithsonian Institution’s Digital Volunteer Platform

Andrew Gunther

Lead Application Developer, Enterprise Digital Asset Network, Office of the Chief Information Officer, Smithsonian Institution, gunthera@si.edu

Michael Schall

Senior Consultant, Quotient, Inc.

Contractor for the Office of the Chief Information Officer, Smithsonian Institution, mschall@quotient-inc.com

Ching-hsien Wang

Branch Manager, Library and Archives Systems Support Branch, Office of the Chief Information Officer, Smithsonian Institution, Transcription Center Project Manager, WangCH@si.edu

Abstract This article discusses the technical design considerations in creating and evolving a digital volunteer platform for transcribing historic documents and collection records. We outline the thought process of our technical team in attempting to architect and build a system that could achieve a mission of collecting knowledge to promote discovery as well as a platform that was extensible, versatile, able to be integrated, and adaptable to future needs. A unique and unexpected aspect of our project is that the digital volunteers not only contributed data but also shaped (and continue to shape) the technical product, user interface, and user experience.

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Medium 9780874216424

5. Revising

Joseph Harris Utah State University Press ePub

Revising

FIRST DRAFT OF PAPER INADVERTENTLY BECOMES FINAL DRAFT EUGENE, OR—The first draft of an English 140 paper by University of Oregon sophomore Marty Blain ultimately became the final draft, Blain reported Monday. “I was gonna keep working on it and add a bunch of stuff about how the guy who wrote [The Great Gatsby] was affected by a lot of the stuff going on around him,” she said. “But then I was like, fuck it.” Blair said that she spent the time that would have been devoted to revision watching Friends in her dorm’s TV lounge.

The Onion, September 27, 2000

I’m dying for some action
I’m sick of sitting ’round here trying to
write this book.

—Bruce Springsteen, “Dancing in the Dark”

So far in this book I’ve offered you moves for rewriting—for making the words, ideas, words, and images of others part of your own project as a writer. In this last chapter, I propose some ways of using those moves in revising—that is, in rethinking, refining, and developing—your own work-in-progress as writer. Revising is thus a particular form of what throughout this book I’ve called rewriting; it names the work of returning to a draft of a text you’ve written in order to make your thinking in it more nuanced, precise, suggestive, and interesting.

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Medium 9781622500277

Prewriting: Audience Viewpoint

Elliott Quinley Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

Basic Skills Practice

Prewriting: Audience Viewpoint

Before you begin to write, spend some time thinking about your audience. Why? The more you know about your target audience, the more effective your message will be.

Be aware that different audiences have different experiences, beliefs, and opinions.

Their viewpoints are often based on different fears, wants, and needs.

A. Here’s a chance to show what you already know about differences among audiences. Circle the word that correctly completes each sentence.

1. Ads for ( arthritis / acne ) medicine are usually targeted to teenagers.

2. Gun control is a primary interest of ( police officers / big business owners ).

3. ( Security / Popularity ) is a major concern of senior citizens.

4. ( Adults / Teenagers ) are more likely to object to loud music.

5. ( Merchandisers / Minorities ) would probably support a candidate who fights against prejudice.

6. ( Army generals / Pacificists ) usually believe that nuclear weapons should be banned.

B. Write a letter to match each audience in column one with its probable viewpoint in column two.

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Medium 9781622500253

Mechanics: Proofreading

Emily Hutchinson Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

Basic Skills Practice

Mechanics: Proofreading

Error-free work makes a great impression. Take the time to check your manuscript for careless mistakes! Proofreading is one of the last steps in the writing process. When you proofread, you mark errors in your work so you can correct them in your final draft.

Study the standard editing marks in the chart below. editor’s mark

meaning

example

delete

The the fish swam away.

capitalize

four students got perfect scores.

use lowercase

The Ballerina wore a blue tutu.

insert a word

Doris has a cup coffee.

RO

run-on sentence

The bell rang a child was at the door.

frag.

sentence fragment

sp

of

RO

frag.

Throughout the entire year.

sp

spelling error

Barbara was embarassed.

transpose letters or words

Marna wroet stories four for the magazine.

add a period

Jack gave Georgia a bracelet

add a comma

We grow oranges lemons, and peaches.

add an apostrophe

Saras favorite color is pink.

add quotation marks

Erin replied, I’d love to!

begin a new paragraph

“Welcome to our home!” said

Marie. “Thanks for inviting us,” said Carl.

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Medium 9781855755079

4. Getting Started: Extraversion and Introversion

John K. DiTiberio Karnac Books ePub

4

Getting started is often the most difficult part of writing. This is especially true when we take other people’s advice about how to go about writing rather than trusting our own natural way. To illustrate, we’d like to give you a flavor for different ways people focus their energy and attention when beginning to write.

Wherever you happen to be as you begin reading this chapter, we’d like you to make some adjustments to the environment around you. Try the two different exercises for getting started that follow. If you find that you are not very satisfied with the changes we suggest in the first exercise, then skip to the second one and try those recommendations instead.

Before starting the exercises, have available an audiocassette tape recorder. While reading the exercise, walk with this book in your hand into a room where other people are present. Tell them you’d like to talk about the best way for you to get started writing. You’re also seeking their reaction, in part to help you clarify your ideas.

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Medium 9781622500277

Frequently Confused Words

Elliott Quinley Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

Basic Skills Practice

Frequently Confused Words

A. Read the definition and example sentence for each word. Then demonstrate correct usage by writing example sentences of your own.

can   physically able

may   implies permission

  Joe can do pushups.   You may leave early.

1. (can) ____________________________________________________________________

2. (may) ____________________________________________________________________

lie   to recline

lay   to place

  Lie down for a rest.   Lay the shirt in the box.

3. (lie) _____________________________________________________________________

4. (lay) _____________________________________________________________________

sit   take a seat

set   to place

  Sit on the green chair.   Set the vase on the mantel.

5. (sit) _____________________________________________________________________

6. (set) _____________________________________________________________________

loan something lent,

especially money

lend to give something or the use

of something for a while

  Thanks for the loan.   He will lend her his car.

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Medium 9780253019417

2 The Patterning of Style: Indices of Performance through Ethnopoetic Analysis of Century-Old Wax Cylinders

Paul V Kroskrity Indiana University Press ePub

Alexander D. King

ETHNOPOETICS IS PREDICATED on the understanding that form and content are so intertwined that it is impossible to disentangle one from the other. Ethnopoetic analysis thus requires learning the grammatical structures of a story’s original language in order to carry out the necessary close reading of the text. One cannot approach anything like a full analysis of a story without attempting to understand person marking, the tense-mode-aspect system, or other basic grammatical forms and relations in the language of origin. Franz Boas certainly understood this axiom, as is clear from his insistence on the publication of texts in the original language with interlinear glosses as well as free translations. Dell Hymes moved beyond the crib of Boasian linguistics with an attention to quality translations (1981, 2003). I use translations in the plural because the movements are across several frames simultaneously: from one lexico-grammatical frame to another, from one cultural frame to another, and from an oral frame to a written one. The three translations of code, context, and mode are intertwined, of course, as form and content are inseparable. Commentary and criticism of Hymesian ethnopoetics has tended to dwell on the last frame shift—from speech to written verse organized by threes and fives or twos and fours. Translation is more than just choosing the right words or rendering an exotic tongue into English with the right effect. Hymes’s work demonstrates that translation is both possible and desirable.

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Medium 9780985890223

Part III Tier 3 Vocabulary Terms From the Common Core State Standards

Robert J. Marzano Marzano Research ePub

part III contains Tier 3 domain-specific terms from the CCSS. In our analysis of the CCSS, we sought to include every important word that appeared in the grade-level standards. Additionally, we included terms that appeared in an earlier compilation of vocabulary from standards documents (Marzano, 2004). Please visit marzanoresearch.com/commoncore for a complete alphabetical listing of the terms in this section and the sources of each term. Teachers can use the appendix (page 215) to locate specific words in parts II and III.

Because the words in part III are all subject-specific (math or ELA), they are organized into measurement topics rather than categories (as in part II). A measurement topic is simply a category of related words. Also, because there are approximately ten times as many terms in part III as in part II, providing descriptions and examples (as in part II) for each Tier 3 term was beyond the scope of this work. In lieu of descriptions and examples for the part III terms, each term in part III is accompanied by a suggested grade-level range. This allows teachers to quickly locate appropriate words for their current topic of study at their assigned grade level.

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Medium 9781442276147

We Learn Together

Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

We Learn Together

Crowdsourcing as Practice and Method in the Smithsonian Transcription Center

Meghan Ferriter

Project Coordinator of the Transcription Center at the Smithsonian Institution, ferriterm@si.edu

Christine Rosenfeld

Ph.D. candidate in Cultural Studies at George Mason University, crosenfe@gmu.edu

Dana Boomer

Independent Researcher, dana_boomer@yahoo.com

Carla Burgess

Independent Researcher, Pittsboro, North Carolina, thecarlaburgess@gmail.com

Siobhan Leachman

Independent Researcher, Wellington, New Zealand, Siobhan_leachman@yahoo.co.nz

Victoria Leachman

Independent Scholar, Wellington, New Zealand, victoria.leachman@gmail.com

Heidi Moses

Independent Scholar, Sydney, Nova Scotia, hmmoses@gmail.com

Felicia Pickering

Research Collaborator (retired Ethnology Museum Specialist), Department of Anthropology, NMNH, Smithsonian Museum Support Center, pickerif@si.edu

Megan E. Shuler

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Medium 9781442265790

Note from the Field

Collections ePub

Sophie White

Associate Professor of American Studies, Concurrent Associate Professor, Dept. of Africana Studies and Dept. of History, University of Notre Dame, 1042 Flanner Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556; swhite1@nd.edu

I write as the digitization project for the Louisiana Colonial Documents Database (LCDD) nears completion. And as I do so, I recall the huge wave of relief that swept over me when I first heard that these extraordinary documents were scanned, and were now safe, permanently. For an archive housed in New Orleans, that is no small thing—as Hurricane Katrina so rudely reminded us. As I saw for myself the exceptional quality of the digitization, and how technology can magnify documents to facilitate deciphering, my thoughts meandered to the significance of this achievement for historians like me: unfettered access to a signal collection of national and international importance.

This astoundingly rich archive is quite simply a historian’s dream, because of the range of information contained within the collection, about economic, political, religious, and social events for example, found within documents ranging from business records, to marriage contracts, and criminal investigations. But it is in the evidence pertaining to the lives of the non-literate that this archive stands out, allowing us—and indeed nudging us—to re-interpret the experience of non-elites and of women, not least through the courtroom testimony of enslaved individuals (the scope of which is unique in any North American archive).

See All Chapters

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