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Medium 9781442265790

Survivor(s)! Historical Peregrinations of New Orleans’s French Superior Council and Spanish Judicial Records

Collections; Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Howard Margot

Curator, The Historic New Orleans Collection, Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street, New Orleans, LA 70130; howardm@hnoc.org

Abstract The city of New Orleans is home to extensive notarial and judicial manuscript records that document, often in minute detail, economic and legal activity in the Lower Mississippi Valley during the French (1699–1768) and Spanish (1769–1803) colonial periods. The legal custodianship of New Orleans’s largest colonial period archive has changed hands quite often over the last three centuries. This article recounts the peregrinations of these documents and their insertion into the collections of the Notarial Archives Division of the Orleans Parish Clerk of Civil Court’s office (NONA) and Old U.S. Mint of the Louisiana State Museum (LSM).

In addition to the considerable parochial archives of its Catholic Archdiocese (baptisms, marriages, deaths) and a modest but very important archive held in its main Public Library (the records of the Spanish Cabildo), the city of New Orleans is home to extensive notarial and judicial1 manuscript records that document, often in minute detail, economic and legal activity in the Lower Mississippi Valley during the French (1699–17682) and Spanish (1769–1803) colonial periods. Taken together, these three sets of records bear the names and witness to the lives of virtually every colonist who was propertied, and of many or most who were not, and of virtually every enslaved person who was ever publicly bought or sold or freed in New Orleans and environs during that span of time. But whereas the ecclesiastical and Cabildo (city hall) records have been continuously curated by the respective institutions that generated them in the eighteenth century, the legal custodianship of New Orleans’s largest colonial period archive—its notarial acts and judicial records—has changed hands quite often over the last three centuries, the most recent occurrence having been in 2007. Most often, the changes in custodianship have entailed changes in physical location, with the records’ having been transported a distance of anything from a few city blocks to a hundred miles. These peregrinations have for over two centuries compromised both the coherence of this priceless archive and the public’s ability to access it, and on too many occasions they have threatened its very existence.

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Medium 9781607321996

PART I Agency in the Formation of Early Writing and Notational Systems

Joshua Englehardt University Press of Colorado ePub

MARGARET A. JACKSON

In recent years, the long-standing model of a dichotomous relationship between text and image, a mainstay of the semiotic approach to visual communication, has fallen increasingly under criticism.1 Our daily interactions with computers and icons of all kinds make it obvious that the world is populated by countless varieties of conventionalized and codified visual signs that operate outside the strictures of language. There are any number of visual codes that are neither purely text nor purely image. This realization is reflected by increased scholarly attention and greatly expanded curiosity about the workings of these alternate forms, which are known as “semasiographies.” This shift ultimately makes the present analysis possible.

Scholarship on semasiography ranges from discourse analysis and visual culture studies to linguistics and cognitive science. It is a challenging array of disciplines; the category includes everything from symbolic diagramming and math to transit maps and, of course, pictographies and hieroglyphics—genres of great interest among Americanists. Such multiplicity points to the fact that “semasiography” is actually an umbrella term covering a range of graphic systems and operative structures.

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Medium 9780874216592

Appendix B: Samples of Tim’s Essays

Anne Beaufort Utah State University Press ePub

Here are two essays Tim wrote in his freshman year of college: one, a textual analysis of an article by an ethicist, written for Freshman Writing, and the other, a historical essay interpreting events and texts for a western civilization course, also Tim’s first year at the university.

RIGHT AND WRONG IN GENETIC ENGINEERING: A CHRISTIAN’S PERSPECTIVE (FOR EGL 102)

The last decade’s discoveries in genetic science have opened discussions at the dinner table, laboratory, and Congress on questions that ten years ago existed solely on the pages of science fiction. Their relevance is now real, casting confusion over the decisions of birth, illness, treatment, and death. Is it morally justified, many ask, to read a fetus’ genetic code, allowing the parents to abort a handicapped child? Is it right to consider altering the DNA, the very map of life? Isn’t the integrity of life threatened by manipulating genetic traits?

Answers given to questions of right and wrong in genetic therapy range widely. Many fear that people who altered the genetic makeup of individuals would be “playing God.” Other invoke the experience of the Nazi era in Germany and oppose any development of gene-altering processes, concerned that it will lead to similar atrocities. Still others suggest that any new technology that is useful should be put into practice.

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Medium 9780749461973

Case study answers

Comfort, Jeremy Kogan Page ePub

Case study answers

Case study 1 : Nora Lundquist

Possible answers

1. Nora has her way of doing things but this is not working in this new international environment. When she started on the project, she needed to keep an open mind and observe how the others behave and communicate. Then she needed to adapt her quiet and thoughtful style to this new environment. This does not mean changing her character but learning some skills which help her to be more proactive in her communication. She is suffering from a sort of culture shock where she cant find her place. If she can be less demanding of her role in the project, she can still appreciate the experience and learn from it. She could speak to Sam about him actively involving her more.

2. Sam doesnt seem to have gone through the mapping stage at the start of the project. It is very important for all to understand who they are working with, their backgrounds and their strengths. In the first face-to-face meeting, he needed to spend time mapping the diversity in the group in terms of knowledge, experience, culture and personality. He needed to sell this diversity to the group so they all see it as an advantage. He could also establish some best practice during virtual and face-to-face meetings where there is an opportunity for all to contribute. He seems to be saying that it is up to the participants to find their place in the team but this is his responsibility as well. Now that they are some way into the project, he could include a feedback and lessons learnt session during the next meeting. He will need to structure the feedback so there is a chance to recognize the positives as well as the areas for development. Following this team feedback, he can then more actively manage the communication in the team.

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Medium 9781538101391

Introduction to Focus Issue: Collections in a Digital Age

Collections; Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Introduction to Focus Issue

Collections in a Digital Age
Lauren TiltonVisiting Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA, LTilton@richmond.edu
Brent M. Rogers
Historian and Documentary Editor, The Joseph Smith Papers, brentrogers2121@gmail.comIn Spring 2015, a working group engaged in questions at the intersection of digital and public history at the annual National Council on Public History (NCPH) meeting held in Nashville, Tennessee. The vibrant discussion focused on the exciting and important ways by which public historians make digital, public history. Because a significant amount of work has centered on digitizing and augmenting historical archives, this special issue explores digital approaches to physical collections. Inflected by the contributors’ positioning in public history, the issue highlights how digital approaches are shaped by questions of access, audience, collaboration, interpretation, and materiality. From that discussion in Nashville arose another conversation to convey some of the practical challenges, decisions, applications, and opportunities as experienced by working group discussants. It seemed then, and with the collection of articles in this issue it is even more apparent that the lessons learned by working group discussants are widely applicable to practitioners of public history and digital history, and public, digital history.

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Medium 9781936757114

Appendix 7: Sources

Brian O'Leary Book Industry Study Group ePub
Medium 9781538106228

The Louisiana State Museum Music Collection Oral Histories

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Louisiana State Museum Music Collection Oral Histories

Digitization, Preservation, and Use

David Kunian

Music Curator, Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans, Louisiana, dkunian@crt.la.gov

Abstract The Louisiana State Museum, a statewide network of National Historic Landmarks, architecturally significant structures, and half a million artifacts, has a robust collection of oral histories with New Orleans jazz originators, revival figures, and other New Orleans and Louisiana musicians. This collection of oral histories consists of more than 300 interviews in the following formats: reel-to-reel and cassette tapes, digital audiotape, videotape, CD and DVD, and assorted digital file formats, such as WAV, MP3, and MP4. This article examines the range of the Music Collection, explains its value, and makes the case for digitization and preservation. Finally, the article provides examples of use in on-site exhibitions as well as online dissemination through the New Orleans Jazz Museum.

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Medium 9781609947439

Part 6: Let’s Talk Business!

Fleming, Carol Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Do you need to develop your professionalism? Dealing with the public on behalf of a business requires you to conduct yourself in a way that reflects your personal identification with your occupation. You need to understand what being professional means and how you can communicate it.

The three aspects of work behavior that will be considered important to your professionalism are your expertise, your attitudes and standards, and your communication skills. Performance reviews always consider communication skills.

This word describes what you know or do that has (monetary) value to others. When you “know your stuff,” what is the stuff you know? Your stuff may be old or cutting-edge. It may be traditional and well-understood (dentist), or technical (computer architect), or vague (administrative assistant).

No matter what your particular job is, it is important that you be able to articulate what your capability is. If it is ill-defined, it is hard to sell or defend. Try to describe what you (can) do to your friends with concrete descriptions of your activities. Their questions may help you realize what you have omitted saying. Practice this so you are fluent as well as accurate.

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Medium 9781538101391

Rediscovering Physical Collections Through the Digital Archive: The Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project

Collections; Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Rediscovering Physical Collections Through the Digital Archive

The Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project

Kyle B. Roberts

Assistant Professor of Public History and New Media and Director, Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL, kroberts2@luc.edu

AbstractHistoric library collections offer a rich and underexplored resource for teaching undergraduate and graduate students about new digital approaches, methodologies, and platforms. Their scope and scale can make them difficult to analyze in their physical form, but remediated onto a digital platform, they offer valuable insights into the process of archive creation and the importance of making their content available to audiences that cannot normally access it. The Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project (JLPP) was launched by students, faculty, and library professionals in 2014 to create an online archive of marks of ownership—bookplates, stamps, inscriptions—contained within books from the original library collection of St. Ignatius College, precursor to Loyola University Chicago. The project grew out of student work for a university museum exhibition commemorating the bi-centennial of the restoration of the Society of Jesus (more commonly known as the Jesuits). Utilizing the popular social media image-sharing site Flickr, the JLPP seeks to foster a participatory community of students, scholars, collectors, and the broader public interested in the history of early and modern Catholic print and the intellectual framework and approach of 19th-century Jesuit education. Initially intended to provide students with the chance to learn how to conceptualize, plan, and build a digital archive, the JLPP has proven equally effective for teaching about digital scholarship, shared authority, and, rather unexpectedly, about the materiality of collections in the digital age

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Medium 9780874216592

Chapter 6 - New Directions for University Writing Instruction

Anne Beaufort Utah State University Press ePub

As I begin this final chapter, I wish first to honor the acts of courage and integrity of all of Tim’s teachers to teach him well, as well as Tim’s own dedication to learning and to making a meaningful contribution to society. I am privileged that these individuals have allowed me to get to know them and to try, through this research, to provide suggestions for how we all might teach writing better. And to all who read this for the sake of this same enterprise of teaching well and learning well, I say, we are in this inquiry together. Knowing readers will make their own connections and draw their own conclusions from this work, I offer final thoughts only as catalyst for furthering the inquiry we are in together.

It seems to me that three things need to be noted at the end of this case study.

First: a developmental model for understanding writers’ growth, for designing curriculum and assessment measures and for training teachers (whether writing teachers or teachers in other disciplines) and tutors needs to encompass the five knowledge and skill domains used here to frame the analysis of a writer’s growth. To focus on one or several aspects of writing expertise to the exclusion of the others represents less than a full view of the developmental process for gaining writing expertise. This theoretical lens can be useful not only in designing curriculum and understanding what the causes are for individual students’ writing problems, but also in designing tools for assessing writing development.

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Medium 9781442265790

List of Acronyms

Collections; Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Emily Clark and Greg Lambousy

The aim of this special issue A Note from the Guest Editors of Collections is twofold. It exploits the potential of Louisiana’s colonial documents to illuminate some of the rewards and challenges of the Atlantic World paradigm—a relatively recent way of researching, writing and thinking about the era that began when Europe, Africa, and the Americas encountered one another and were drawn into dynamic currents of economic, cultural, and political exchange between the fourteenth and nineteenth centuries. The Atlantic World gave birth to the transatlantic slave trade, the Columbian Exchange, and racial hierarchies. It ended with the abolition of slavery and the spasm of rebellions against European power marked by the American and Haitian Revolutions and Latin American independence movements. The Atlantic World was a transnational phenomenon, and although it overlaps what represented the colonial period for much of North America, its history is not easily told from the perspective of any one of the major colonial European powers that exercised sovereignty there. For this reason, the colonial records of Louisiana, which was held by both France and Spain, offer a particularly illuminating case study of the legacies of the Atlantic World in American archives. An ambitious project, undertaken by the Louisiana State Museum, to digitize these records has drawn renewed attention to their importance and their potential to contribute substantially to the growing field of Atlantic history. (This project is scheduled for completion in 2016.)

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Medium 9781442265790

Digital Preservation for Libraries, Archives, and Museums

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Edward M Corrado and Heather Lea Moulaison

Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014. 294 pp. ISBN: 978-0-8108-8712-1

Reviewed by Kristin Condotta, Adjunct Instructor in History, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO; condotta@wustl.edu

Digital preservation is a leadership issue. This is the key and convincing argument of Edward M. Corrado and Heather Lea Moulaison’s Digital Preservation for Libraries, Archives, & Museums. Their book—which explores “preserving curating and preserving digital content for long-term access” in the arts and sciences—offers a reflective look at the digitization process from two scholars well experienced with web technologies (xix). Its stance is more “I wish I thought of/planned for that before starting” than “how-to,” and purposefully so. This big-picture approach allows their suggestions to be applicable across systems and institutions.

Corrado and Moulaison particularly promote a proactive approach to artifact and research digitization. They emphasize that such projects are long-term and need to be defined as clear yet flexible organizational, technological and financial commitments early in their inception. More centrally, the authors expand on the concerns of subject forerunner Michael Lesk as expressed in the book’s forward, that too much attention has gone to the IT aspects of digital preservation. They instead argue for a “triad of interrelated [and interdependent] activities,” or those relating to management, technology and content (17). They identify management, or the ability of project leaders to make transparent decisions about their digital collection’s access, composition and authenticity during its life-cycle, as the most valuable of these three commitments. As a result, Digital Preservation is geared towards a specific audience of librarians, archivists and curators—as opposed to collections specialists, cataloguers and systems technicians—who typically are charged with shaping the long-term trajectory of digital projects. It points out the ways that digital media share many issues with physical collections (i.e., fitting organizational missions, copyright and preservation), yet have their own challenges (i.e., rapidly changing formats). Above all, it provides the insight needed for these professionals and their institutes to craft forward-looking Memorandum of Understanding for their own digital preservation projects.

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Medium 9780870819018

18. Syntax—Main Clauses and Sentence-level

Andrew Cowell University Press of Colorado ePub

In this section we examine in detail the general claims made earlier that the unmarked position for NPs in Arapaho is postverbal and that the marked focus position for NPs is preverbal. We also show more generally that syntax in Arapaho is largely a question of pragmatics, with the marked syntactic position being the pragmatic focus position. Any focused constituent of the sentence can occupy this marked preverbal position. These general observations have been made for other Algonquian languages as well, including Massachusett (Goddard and Bragdon 1988:586, where they argue that word order often has a “discourse function”), Plains Cree (Wolfart 1996:394), and Nishnaabemwin (Valentine 2001:951-957).

We begin with an examination of main clause syntax, followed by a brief summary of syntax internal to subordinate clauses (much of which has been covered earlier, especially in chapter 17), followed by sentence-level syntax, including sentences with multiple clauses and cleft constructions.

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Medium 9781538101391

Sparking Rural Community Dialogues with Digital Oral Histories

Collections; Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Sparking Rural Community Dialogues with Digital Oral Histories

William S. Walker

Cooperstown Graduate Program, SUNY Oneonta, Cooperstown, NY, william.walker@oneonta.edu

AbstractIn the past, oral history recordings often lay inert and ignored on archival or library shelves. The digital revolution has transformed accessibility to oral histories, primarily by opening digital archives to a variety of users. Nevertheless, many audiences, particularly in rural areas, still do not engage with these digital archives. By incorporating digital oral history content into public programs, however, public historians can involve their audiences in community dialogues that connect past and present and open new avenues for engaging with challenging contemporary issues. This approach employs the dialogue methodology of the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience and has been successfully implemented in rural central New York State. Collecting with the intention of incorporating oral histories into community dialogue programs shifts the focus from static preservation and exhibition to a dynamic model of sharing authority, which directly engages one’s local community.

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Medium 9781936765171

3 Assessing the Performance of English Learners

Douglas Fisher Solution Tree Press ePub

Issues of accountability and assessment have become part of the daily discourse of principals. In fact, you may have turned to this chapter first, because you believed it unthinkable to separate the discussion of English learner issues from the measurement of their progress. For much of the history of education in the United States, however, that was not the case. Despite the fact that the United States consists of immigrants and their descendants, English language acquisition was viewed as an imperative for the child but not necessarily for the school. However, a series of court cases and statutes have shifted the responsibility to give assessment a prominent role.

Assessment for English learners requires attention to the whole child. A multidimensional approach is necessary in order for a true picture to emerge. This requires balancing large-scale assessments with individualized informal ones that highlight strengths, rather than simply catalog deficits.

• Haven’t English learners always been assessed?

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