71 Chapters
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5. Rage Against the Machine

Anita Belles Porterfield and John Porterfield University of North Texas Press PDF

Starz Strip Club in Killeen, Texas

Photo by John Porterfield

5. Rage Against the Machine

N

I will do such things,

What they are, yet I know not: but they shall be

The terrors of the earth.

~King Lear, Act II, Scene IV

idal Hasan may not have been successful in finding a wife but he certainly demonstrated his appreciation of the female form when he visited the Killeen strip club, Starz, on the evenings of Thursday, October 29 and Friday, October 30. He had visited

Starz before and he knew that he would not be able to buy alcoholic beverages there. He stopped at a convenience store on his way and bought a couple of six packs of Bud Lite—not for himself, but for the ten dancers who curled their bodies around floor-to-ceiling poles and performed nude. He also stopped at his bank and got a wad of five dollar bills. Hasan preferred to go to Starz because the people with whom he worked did not frequent this particular club.1

Starz is a non-descript, shabby strip joint located just down the street from the main gate at Fort Hood and next door to Guns Galore.

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2. King of the Hill

Anita Belles Porterfield and John Porterfield University of North Texas Press ePub

The aftermath of George Hennard's shooting rampage at Luby's in Killeen, Texas. Photo courtesy of The Temple Daily Telegram.

Those who are bent on wrongdoing will in time come to know how evil a turn their destinies are bound to take!
~Inspire Magazine

Minutes after the shooting began at the SRP Center, Fort Hood was locked down. Without access to the base, reporters descended on the Killeen City Hall where spokeswoman Hilary Shine briefed them on the unfolding situation.

“Unfortunately, this is a day we had dreaded, we are in an emergency situation,” Ms. Shine said in a statement to the media. “Every time you hear of a mass casualty situation in Killeen, you think of Luby's and twenty-six people who were killed. Here in City Hall, it's panic.”1

“We know the terrible impact and not knowing how it will end is gut wrenching right now. Fort Hood is set up as its own city, they have their own fire, police, SWAT…they have asked for EMT and ambulance assistance.” Shine added that the ambulances were having “issues” getting on and off base.2

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18. Petr Badmaev (1851–1920)

Edited by Stephen M Norris and Willard Indiana University Press ePub

 

DAVID MCDONALD

As much as any other figure of his time, Petr Aleksandrovich Badmaev embodied the conflicting notes of ambition, ambivalence, optimism, and suspicion that marked Russia’s career as an imperial power in East Asia during the last decades of Romanov rule. Historians know him best as the author of an elaborate 1893 memorandum advocating Russia’s historic mission to extend the “white tsar’s” sway over eastern China and Tibet. Contemporary observers and posterity alike also regarded him as a symbol of the autocracy’s decadence or disarray during its final years under Nicholas II, one of those shadowy figures like his sometime associate Rasputin who played an unsavory role “behind the scenes of tsarism.”1 While these perspectives certainly offer useful approaches to understanding Badmaev as a “personality of empire,” they also downplay or submerge two other salient facts—his visible exoticness as a Buriat who made his livelihood in the imperial metropolis, and the degree to which his improbable career, and historical notoriety, themselves resulted from the same forces that propelled Russia into East Asia during the years after 1855.

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Medium 9781574416053

5. Rage against the Machine

Anita Belles Porterfield and John Porterfield University of North Texas Press ePub

Starz Strip Club in Killeen, Texas Photo by John Porterfield Photo by John Porterfield

I will do such things, What they are, yet I know not: but they shall be The terrors of the earth.
~King Lear, Act II, Scene IV

Nidal Hasan may not have been successful in finding a wife but he certainly demonstrated his appreciation of the female form when he visited the Killeen strip club, Starz, on the evenings of Thursday, October 29 and Friday, October 30. He had visited Starz before and he knew that he would not be able to buy alcoholic beverages there. He stopped at a convenience store on his way and bought a couple of six packs of Bud Lite—not for himself, but for the ten dancers who curled their bodies around floor-to-ceiling poles and performed nude. He also stopped at his bank and got a wad of five dollar bills. Hasan preferred to go to Starz because the people with whom he worked did not frequent this particular club.1

Starz is a non-descript, shabby strip joint located just down the street from the main gate at Fort Hood and next door to Guns Galore. It's smaller and noisier than most of the other clubs that dot the area around Fort Hood. Hasan pulled into the Starz parking lot at half past six, just thirty minutes after it opened, and handed manager Matthew Jones the fifteen dollar cover. He bought a bucket of ice to keep the beer cold and settled down alone at a rear table. As each girl finished her dance Hasan politely got up and walked to the stage, tipped her five dollars and handed her a beer. He took quite a liking to a blonde stripper named Paige. He asked her for a three-song nude lap dance in a private room and paid the fifty dollar charge without hesitation. He purchased a total of three lap dances during his two visits, two from Paige and one from another stripper.2

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7 The Historical Dimension of Manifest Destiny

Jeremy Black Indiana University Press ePub

The United States had gone through its own process of creating history in the wake of independence. The presentation of history, indeed, notably the history of winning independence, was an important aspect of American state-building and nation-forming. More recently, this presentation has played a central role in what the Americans see as culture wars. History wars proved an important component of these, although the term is a misnomer as fatalities scarcely match levels seen elsewhere in the world when such contests over identity are waged.

From the outset of American independence in 1776, the past was not only celebrated, but also contested as an aspect of debates and disputes over the nature and role of political authority. Particular controversy focused on the rights of federal and state authorities. These concerns affected interest in the history of other countries. This history, notably of countries when under republican governments, such as the Netherlands in the early-modern period, Classical Athens, and republican Rome, was scrutinized in order to provide constitutional guidance and political ammunition. The strong interest in history shown by the Founding Fathers focused on how to save republics from succumbing to foreign attack, domestic discord, or the rise of tyranny. James Madison, later fourth president, wrote a study of previous attempts at confederation. Thomas Jefferson, the second president as well as the founder of the University of Virginia, wanted modern history taught in order to show what he saw as the folly of the opposing Federalists.

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