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10. One Nation’s Terrorist Is Another Nation’s Freedom Fighter

Anita Belles Porterfield and John Porterfield University of North Texas Press PDF

Death on Base: The Fort Hood Massacre

In 2005 the Defense Personnel Security Research Center (DPSRC) defined terrorism as “anyone who [is] sympathetic to, or a member of, a group that could be characterized as both disloyal and hostile toward the U.S. government.” The DPSRC included “main foreign

(militant jihadists) and domestic groups (White Supremacists, White

Nationalists, and domestic militias) whose past and recent actions and current ideologies render them particularly hostile and disloyal toward the U.S. government. The report cited “attempted or actual enlistment of disloyal and hostile persons.”2

The U.S. Department of State defines terrorism as “premeditated, politically motivated violence perpetrated against noncombatant targets by subnational groups or clandestine agents, usually intended to influence an audience.”3

The FBI, however, employs a broader definition of terrorism, calling it the “unlawful use of force and violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of political or social objectives.”4

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15. Anton Rubinstein (1829–1894)

Edited by Stephen M Norris and Willard Indiana University Press ePub

 

RICHARD STITES

Anton Grigorevich Rubinstein (Rubinshtein), although born at the edge of the Russian Empire, a member of a despised people, nonetheless became a central figure in the life of what is, alongside literature, Russia’s first great cultural contribution to the world in the nineteenth century—classical music. Not a great composer, his music falls out the canonical progression that begins with the compositions of Mikhail Glinka (1804–57). Rather he became a world-renowned concert pianist, an aggressive promoter of European art music in Russia, and the founder—against tough odds—of the first Russian conservatory. Rubinstein in many ways always remained a bridge between Russia and Europe, even down to his Jewish roots on both sides. His mother hailed from Silesia, an eastern wing of the Kingdom of Prussia. His father, Russified and a convert to Orthodoxy, came from a town in a corner of Podolia near Bessarabia, recently acquired from the Ottoman Turks—a true borderland where dwelled Ukrainians, Romanians, Russians, Jews, Tatars, Turks, and Greeks. Characteristically, the “western” bride and the “eastern” groom met in Odessa, one of the great crossroads of Europe.

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5. Rage Against the Machine

Anita Belles Porterfield and John Porterfield University of North Texas Press PDF

Starz Strip Club in Killeen, Texas

Photo by John Porterfield

5. Rage Against the Machine

N

I will do such things,

What they are, yet I know not: but they shall be

The terrors of the earth.

~King Lear, Act II, Scene IV

idal Hasan may not have been successful in finding a wife but he certainly demonstrated his appreciation of the female form when he visited the Killeen strip club, Starz, on the evenings of Thursday, October 29 and Friday, October 30. He had visited

Starz before and he knew that he would not be able to buy alcoholic beverages there. He stopped at a convenience store on his way and bought a couple of six packs of Bud Lite—not for himself, but for the ten dancers who curled their bodies around floor-to-ceiling poles and performed nude. He also stopped at his bank and got a wad of five dollar bills. Hasan preferred to go to Starz because the people with whom he worked did not frequent this particular club.1

Starz is a non-descript, shabby strip joint located just down the street from the main gate at Fort Hood and next door to Guns Galore.

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4. The Great Place

Anita Belles Porterfield and John Porterfield University of North Texas Press PDF

Death on Base: The Fort Hood Massacre tracized. This fundamental conservatism can be traced back to central

Texas’s early Christian heritage.

Spanish Roman Catholic missionaries first came to central Texas in the early seventeenth century to provide religious instruction to Native

Americans. Spain declared Catholicism the official religion of Texas in

1820 and all protestant affiliations were outlawed. Despite the Catholic church’s efforts to keep them out, by the early eighteen hundreds protestant clergy flowed into Texas—first circuit-riding Methodists who preached in private homes, then Baptists who arrived by wagon train, followed by Presbyterians. Protestant colleges sprang up in central

Texas, namely Baylor University in Waco, University of Mary HardinBaylor in Belton, and Southwestern University in Georgetown.1

Central Texas also spawned noteworthy evangelical cults like the Sanctified Sisters in Belton who believed in the revolutionary concept of womens’ equality, and the Davidians, an Adventist reform splinter group of the 1920s which gave rise to the fundamentalist Branch Davidians. In the early 1990s, members of the Branch

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8. Petr Ivanovich Bagration (1765–1812)

Edited by Stephen M Norris and Willard Indiana University Press ePub

 

SEAN POLLOCK

“When my father, King Iese, was in Persia for a time at the shah’s court, I was left to live there in the capital of Isfahan . . . and I remained there with my mother, at the shah’s court, where I was raised in their profane and abominable Mohammedan faith.” So Prince Aleksandr Bagration stated in a 1759 petition addressed to Russia’s Empress Elizabeth (r. 1741–62). Having escaped his enemies, “Christians in Georgia and impious barbarians in Persia,” he requested “to be received into Your Imperial Majesty’s eternal subjecthood and service and awarded a rank in accordance with that given to my kinsmen and nationals [in Russian service] . . . and a double grant in accordance with that given to foreigners as decreed by Your Imperial Majesty.” Not only was Prince Aleksandr granted asylum in Russia, he was soon given command of the Georgian Hussar Regiment stationed in Kizliar, in northern Caucasia, and one of his sons was enrolled in the prestigious Noble Infantry Cadet Corps in the Russian capital of St. Petersburg. Following in his father’s footsteps some years later, Prince Ivan Bagration settled with his family in Kizliar, where his son, Prince Petr Ivanovich Bagration, was raised before going on to become one of the most revered and remembered military commanders in Russian history.1

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