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Chapter 4 - “Fit to Get Down to Serious Business”

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4

“FIt to get doWN to serIous BusINess”

The 142d Infantry Regiment, still containing a large core of men from the old 7th Texas Infantry and the former 1st Oklahoma Infantry regiments, arrived in France at a critical moment in the war. The German Army had launched a massive series of offensives beginning in March of 1918, which German leaders hoped would end the war before the influence of the United States could be felt too strongly on the Western Front. While German forces gained ground, by the summer the offensives along the Western Front had failed to achieve their strategic objectives, and the dynamic changed as the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) continued to strengthen.1

As commander of the AEF, Gen. John J. Pershing struggled with the

Allied leadership over whether or not American units arriving in France should be “amalgamated” into the European armies or used to build a strictly American army. For obvious reasons, Pershing desired the latter while the Allies pressed for amalgamation. By the time the 36th Division arrived in France, Pershing’s goal had been realized with the creation of the First American Army. The question for Colonel Bloor and the soldiers of the 142d Infantry was how they were going to fit into this larger picture, and where and with whom would they fight on the

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Chapter 3 - Camp Bowie and France

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3 caMp BoWIe aNd FraNce

Although local communities treated the soldiers of the 7th Texas as heroes before the regiment had even left North and Northwest Texas, their arrival at

Camp Bowie in the first week of September underscored their lack of training and unfamiliarity with Army ways. The companies from Potter, Donley, and Childress counties arrived first, followed by the companies from Hardeman, Foard, and

Wilbarger counties. Eventually, the Lubbock, Taylor, Denton, Cooke, Johnson and

Wise County soldiers arrived and all of the 7th Texas Infantry companies were in bustling Camp Bowie by September 11, 1917, the first consolidation of the regiment as a whole.1

Of course, the 7th Texas was only one small part of the Texas National Guard, which itself made up a fraction of the entire National Guard called to service for the second time in two years. When “drafted” into federal service on August 5, 1917, the 7th Texas consisted of 56 officers and 1,952 soldiers. At the time, the “combat arms” of the Texas National Guard, which included infantry, cavalry, field artillery, coast artillery, and signal corps, totaled 315 officers and 11,074 men, while the total

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Chapter 1 - Recruiting the 7th Texas Infantry

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1 reCruItIng the 7th texas Infantry

On April 2, 1917, President Woodrow Wilson addressed a joint session of the United States Congress where he responded to a number of events, including the resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare by Germany and the disclosure of the infamous Zimmerman Telegram. He then asked Congress for a declaration of war. Congress debated the president’s request for several days, and approved a declaration of war in the Senate on April 4, 1917, and two days later in the House.1

Although there was debate across the nation as well as within Texas regarding the president’s request for a declaration of war, most Texans supported the president.

Once war was declared, a different topic became the center of debate in the nation and in Texas: How would the United States raise and field an army large enough to make a difference on European battlefields? The answer to that question affected millions of young men across the nation and thousands in Northwest Texas. The debate hinged on whether or not the United States should raise an army by relying on volunteers or through a mandatory system of service. Such a debate was not new to the nation, and as late as February 1917, the government had expected to rely primarily on voluntary enlistments to increase the army’s size. By April, however, the debate became more urgent and crystallized around which system would allow an army to be raised more quickly.2

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Chapter 5 - The Western Front, October 6–13, 1918

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5 the WesterN FroNt, octoBer 6–13, 1918

As the 142d Infantry marched north out of the French village of SommePy, they passed a group of Marines walking south, away from the front. One of those Marines recalled passing “full strong companies of National Guardsmen.

They went up one side of the road; and in ragged columns of two’s, unsightly even in the dim and fitful light, the Marines plodded down the other side.” The Guard companies “gibed” at the Marines as they passed on their way to the front, “singing and joking as they went. High words of courage were on their lips and nervous laughter.” The only response came from a few Marines, who said to each other,

“Hell, them birds don’t know no better … Yeah, we went up singin’ too, once— good Lord, how long ago! ... They won’t sing when they come out … or any time after … in this war.”1

As the regiment wended its way toward the front, Colonel Bloor made his way to the command post of the 6th Marine Regiment, the unit being relieved, to meet with its commander, Col. Harry Lee. He arrived about 11:00 pm on the night of

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Chapter 8 - Coming Home and the War’s Legacy

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8 coMINg hoMe aNd the War’s legacy

While the soldiers of the old 7th Texas and their comrades in the 142d

Infantry and the 36th Division reflected on their experiences and tried to put into words what they had seen and felt, the press and other observers quickly picked up on the division’s exploits. For example, Gen. Stanislas Naulin, commander of the French XXI Corps, under whom the 36th Division served for a time, wrote to

General Smith while the regiment was still at the front. Naulin wrote that Smith’s

“young soldiers … rivaling, in push and tenacity with the older and valiant regiments of General Lejeune, accomplished their mission fully. All can be proud of the work done.” Naulin also expressed “appreciation, gratitude, and best wishes for future successes. The past is an assurance of the future.” This was followed shortly after the armistice by the governors of Texas and Oklahoma, who sent telegrams to General

Smith. Governor Hobby wrote that “all Texas is proud of her brave sons and rejoices over their wonderful achievements.” From his perspective, the soldiers of the old 7th

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