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Medium 9781574411973

A POW in Vietnam: “Smart People, Dumb War”

Edited by Peter B. Lane and Ronald E. Marcello University of North Texas Press PDF

BRIGADIER GENERAL DAVID W. WINN, USAF (RET.)

A POW IN VIETNAM:

“SMART PEOPLE,

DUMB WAR”

Born in Austin, Minnesota, July 20, 1923, David Winn entered the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II and earned his wings and commission as a 2nd lieutenant pilot in

February 1943. He served in North Africa, Sardinia, and Italy during the war. In 1948 he separated from the Air Force.

Recalled to active duty for the Korean War, Winn chose to make the Air Force a career and subsequently served in

Germany, Thailand, Canada, and the United Kingdom as an exchange officer with the RAF. U.S. assignments included duty in Texas, Arizona, Michigan, Colorado, Minnesota, and

Washington, DC. He saw staff duty at the Pentagon with the

Joint Chiefs of Staff. A graduate of the University of Minnesota, he later earned a master’s degree in international relations from George Washington University. He also is a graduate of the National War College.

While on a combat mission in a F-105 out of a base in

Thailand, Winn was shot down over North Vietnam and captured in August 1968. He was a prisoner of war in Hanoi until his release in 1973. As one of the senior POWs, he played an important role in establishing camp policies and conduct

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Medium 9781574413588

Chapter 9: Wayward Policeman Thomas Finch

Richard F. Selcer University Of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER 9

Wayward Policeman Thomas Finch

There is a big difference between dying while a police officer and dying in the line of duty. Ever since 9/11 there has been a wave of popular sentiment nationally to honor fallen peace officers, including those who died decades ago and have been forgotten. Thomas Finch was a commissioned, badge-wearing Niles City policeman when he died, but he did not fall in the line of duty. He was a victim of the unwritten law that has governed marriage since ancient times. The only question is whether he violated that commandment or was set up.

Thomas E. Finch was born in Wise County, Texas, in July 1877 to Amos and Emma Boyd Finch. The Finches came to Texas from Mississippi during Reconstruction, and Thomas was the first of four children born to them in Texas. His brother Jessie came along in 1879, sister, Stella, two years after that, and brother Drew on January 7, 1885. That was a date Thomas never forgot because Emma Finch died giving birth to Drew. Papa, who was a Wise County justice of the peace, was left to raise three young children and an infant on his own.1

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Medium 9780874212341

12 Exploring Canadian Rivers, 1963

Richard Westwood Utah State University Press ePub

Early in June 1963 Georgie made a trip through Cataract Canyon. There were thirty-seven passengers in all, plus Georgie and her dog, Sambo, who made a number of raft trips with her before the Park Service decided dogs should not be allowed on the river.1

Delphine Mohrline was riding on the little boat when they came to Satan’s Gut. She saw the rapid at close range and began to wonder whether it was not a waterfall instead. The drop looked tremendous. She said:

Over we went into this trough about 12 feet deep—the front side came up to meet the backside, we were all lifted off our seats and slammed back down again, twisting and turning, and wondering if our fingers were going to be able to keep holding on. Art and I knocked heads together, even though we were sitting 4 feet apart in different sections of the boat. He said he had been a steeplejack in earlier years and didn’t think the rapids of the Colorado could offer anything more exciting than that. Wonder if he still holds that opinion.

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Medium 9781574411973

Foreshadowing Postwar Iraq: The U.S. War in the Philippines, 1899–1902

Edited by Peter B. Lane and Ronald E. Marcello University of North Texas Press PDF

DR. BRIAN LINN (TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY)

FORESHADOWING THE

WAR IN IRAQ: THE U.S.

WAR IN THE PHILIPPINES,

1899–1902

Dr. Brian Linn is currently professor of history at Texas A&M

University. He is perhaps the foremost authority in the United States concerning the American military experience in the

Pacific in the aftermath of the Spanish-American War.

Dr. Linn received his Ph.D at The Ohio State University in 1985 and has been a member of the Department of History at Texas A&M since 1989. In 2000 he published The Philippine War, 1899–1902 (University Press of Kansas), which was a selection of the History Book Club in 2000 and winner of the Society of Military History’s Distinguished Book Prize in 2001. In 1997, he published Guardians of Empire: The U.S.

Army in the Pacific, 1902–1940 (University of North Carolina

Press). This book also was a History Book Club selection in

1997 and winner of both the Society of Military History’s

Distinguished Book Prize in 1998 and the Army Historical

Foundation’s Distinguished Book Award in 1997. In 1989 he published The U.S. Army and Counterinsurgency in the Philippine War (University of North Carolina Press). In addition to the monographs, he has published sixteen articles and book chapters as well as numerous essays, encyclopedia entries,

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Medium 9780253357083

Prologue

Damani J. Partridge Indiana University Press ePub

As the ’68 generation reaches retirement age, it becomes ever more apparent that Europe needs immigration to support its aging population, but unemployment rates are nearly 50 percent for so-called immigrant youth, many of whom were born in Europe. In this context, Germany and Berlin are not exceptional, but exemplary sites for an investigation of the future of Europe and the future of global noncitizens, particularly when one thinks of this future in relation to the aftermath of socialism and the post-9/11, intensified turn against Islam. In 1989, street protesters in East Germany made public claims that the state be held accountable to their desire, asserting Wir sind das Volk (We are the people). This call for democratic accountability, however, turned into nationalist fervor, expressed in the subsequent chant Wir sind ein Volk (We are one people); the emphasis shifted from democratization to the two Germanys’ “re”unification1 as the path toward social and economic prosperity. From the first moment of flag-waving, it was already clear who was to be included in that “we,” even if there continued to be hierarchical differentiations between West and East Germans and between Western and Eastern Europeans. Even so, just prior to the Wall’s fall, a pluralistic future seemed possible, at least from the perspective of anti-racist activists in West Berlin. Multiculturalism, even if a problematic concept, was not yet a tainted term.

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Medium 9780253356338

9 Apparitions of the Virgin in Egypt: Improving Relations between Copts and Muslims?

Dionigi Albera Indiana University Press ePub

SANDRINE KERIAKOS

Translated by David Macey

Devotional practices centered on saints in contemporary Egypt are often seen as an essentially, or primarily, communitarian phenomenon. We therefore study Coptic practices on the one hand, and Muslim rites on the other. When it comes to saints, religions never mix, or so it is said, rather as though similar practices existed in parallel but never came into contact. Yet if we divorce Christians and Muslims in this way and establish a watertight frontier between their respective practices, we overlook one phenomenon that is at work in contemporary Egypt: the existence of practices common to both. Copts and Muslims are sometimes observed gathering around holy figures, who may or may not be “shared,” and giving their piety free rein without any religious distinctions. They do meet and mingle in holy places. We therefore simply cannot study Egypt’s religious dimension by restricting devotional practices relating to the sacred to either the Christian or the Muslim community. There are overlaps, and there are places that encourage worshipers of both religions to come together, and there are events and saintly figures that encourage them to do so. Two figures stand out: St. Georges, who is often identified with Al-Khidr by Muslims, and the Virgin Mary, who is mentioned in both the Bible and the Koran. This study will concentrate on the latter by looking at an unusual phenomenon. Egypt seems in fact to be something of a special place, as Mary has often appeared there since the 1960s. In most cases, her apparitions have given rise to some form of encounter between Christians and Muslims. This chapter looks at how such encounters are structured, at what makes them possible, at the way they are reported in the press, both communitarian and governmental, and at the extent to which they have survived the changes that have taken place in Egyptian society, where the religious divide is now more pronounced than ever. Written sources (articles in the press and Coptic hagiography) and interviews, some of them with Orthodox Coptic priests, will be used to evoke the memory of these encounters and to look at their contemporary relevance.

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Medium 9780253016713

Conclusion The City of the Forking Paths: Imagining the Futures of Binational Urbanism

Daniel Monterescu Indiana University Press ePub

This land is a traitor

and can’t be trusted.

This land doesn’t remember love.

This land is a whore

holding out a hand to the years,

as it manages a ballroom

on the barber pier. . . .

It laughs in every language

and bit by bit, with its hip,

feeds all who come to it.

TAHA MUHAMMAD ALI, “Ambergris”

A land that devours its inhabitants

And flows with milk and honey and blue skies

Sometimes itself stoops to plunder

The sheep of the poor.

NATAN YONATHAN, “A Song to the Land”

In the agonistic landscape of Israel/Palestine, no place has been more continuously inflected by the tension between intimate proximity and visceral violence than ethnically “mixed” towns. The immanent ambivalence of the binational encounter bespeaks the paradox of the copresence of political Others who are also immediate neighbors. This book has proposed a historical ethnography of binational urbanism by scrutinizing sites of daily interaction and ongoing conflict in contested urban spaces since 1948. Recapturing the longue durée of ethnic mix in the Mediterranean, the Ottoman legacy of confessional sectarianism, and the enduring effect of British colonial rule, I have conceptualized the intricate relations between ethnicity, capital, and binational sociality in these cities and beyond.

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Medium 9781574415476

34. At Nunnely’s Landing

Edited and Annotated by Jacques D. Bagur University of North Texas Press PDF

242    Red River Reminiscences

ceed on his journey, instead of staying at Colonel Scott’s a whole week, as he had first proposed to do. Reluctantly, and after much useless persuasion, the Colonel and his wife consented to his departure; and after breakfast his horse was saddled and brought to the door; and while “Pete” was busy adjusting his saddlebags, the poor victim of these merciless “Arkansaw jokes” attempted to offer something in the way of compensation for his entertainment, but, remembering what his Hempstead County friends had told him—that Colonel Scott would construe the offer of money into an insult and resent it as such—he was at a loss what to say. But, upon shaking hands with the Colonel and his wife and “Andy,” and bidding them good-bye, he ventured to say: “I do not know, my friends, how I shall ever be able to repay you for your kindness and—” “Oh, never mind,” said the Colonel, cutting him short,

“put it all in your book.” “Yes,” said Armstrong, “put it in your book, and if you ever come to White Oak Shoals, look up Andy

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Medium 9780253356987

4. Marginal Lessons

Sonja Luehrmann Indiana University Press ePub

Khrushchev era didacticism owed a great deal of its persuasive power to the palpable social changes that manifested in reconstructed cities, new apartment blocks, promises of more consumer-friendly production targets, and opportunities for participation in volunteer campaigns. While some hopes of impending change proved short-lived, the altered cityscapes brought about through the accelerated construction methods pioneered in the late 1950s remained, and imposed ongoing constraints on post-Soviet developments (Collier 2001). Religious life in Joshkar-Ola also had to adapt. By the end of the Soviet era, legal as well as illegal religious practices were increasingly confined to the outskirts of the city: the Orthodox met in the church of Semënovka, Muslims gathered for prayer in private apartments, and Baptists and Adventists established unregistered houses of prayer in the “private sectors” of single-family wooden houses outside the zones of reconstruction. The center, by contrast, was occupied not only by administrative headquarters, but also by the institutions of secular didacticism—theaters, cinemas, institutions of higher education, the Palace of Young Pioneers, and the planetarium of the Knowledge Society.

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Medium 9780253353283

Sachsenhausen Main Camp

Geoffrey P Megargee Indiana University Press ePub

Undated photograph of the “roller detachment” marching to work.
USHMM WS#82927, COURTESY OF AG-S

Situated next to the Inspectorate of Concentration Camps (IKL, later Office Group D of the SS-Business Administration Main Office, or WVHA) at Oranienburg, just north of Berlin, Sachsenhausen stood at the center of the Nazi concentration camp system. Begun in the summer of 1936, just before the Berlin Olympics, it was the first new concentration camp built after Hitler gave full control of that system to the SS in 1934. As such, Sachsenhausen was intended to be a model facility; indeed, the Nazi press corps toured it for propaganda purposes in March 1938. Nevertheless, the camp’s striking triangular layout—an unwieldy blend of art deco and Jeremy Bentham’s Panopticon—proved ill-suited to expansion, and subsequent camps would follow more conventional patterns.

The SS brought the first 50 prisoners to the proposed site from Esterwegen in July 1936, followed by another 200 before the month was out. Construction began immediately. The protective detention camp, where the prisoners would be housed, took the shape of an isosceles triangle, with a narrow, rectangular headquarters area superimposed over the left side of the triangle’s base. Entrance to the camp was through an imposing gate house, topped by a guard tower. With the camp barracks laid out below in a radial, fanlike pattern, guards in this tower had an unobstructed line of sight virtually throughout the camp. Additional towers punctuated the camp’s stone perimeter wall, inside of which ran an electrified barbed-wire fence. Just inside the main gate was the camp’s sprawling, semicircular roll-call area. Painted on the ends of the barracks abutting it was one of the implausibly exhortative slogans favored in the 1930s-era camps: “There is one path to freedom! Its milestones are: diligence, obedience, honesty, order, cleanliness, sobriety, truthfulness, spirit of sacrifice, and love of the Fatherland!”

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Medium 9780253017086

2 The State’s Pot and the Soldier’s Spoon: Rations (Paëk) in the Red Army

Wendy Z Goldman Indiana University Press ePub

Brandon Schechter

Without a spoon, just as without a rifle, it is impossible to wage war.

Aleksandr Lesin, diary entry, March 29, 1942 1

THE SOLDIER WHO WROTE THE LINES ABOVE CAME TO UNDERstand all too well how important being fed was to being able to fight. Aleksandr Lesin served on the benighted Kalinin Front. In the spring of 1942, he participated in an offensive that bogged down as starving and exhausted soldiers failed to take their objectives.2 The Kalinin Front eventually became a lightning rod for attracting Moscow’s attention to the needs of soldiers’ stomachs.

On May 31, 1943, Stalin signed an order underlining the failure of the rear area services of the Kalinin Front to properly feed its troops. Among a list of complaints, ranging from unequal distribution, improper storage, and failures to provide hot food or use qualified cadres to prepare and apportion rations, Stalin described the essence of the “criminally irresponsible, un-Soviet attitude towards soldier’s food”3 found among those responsible for feeding the army:

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Medium 9780876111178

3. Life-Styles and Community

Foy, Jessica Texas State Historical Assn Press ePub

3.

LIFE-STYLES AND COMMUNITY

WHEN W. P. H. AND IDA MCFADDIN moved into their new home, Beaumonters were still enjoying the prosperity that had begun in the days of the lumber boom. Beaumont boasted a strong, diverse economy, based on lumber, cattle, rice, and petroleum. Even the gradual diminution of the Spindletop oil field held no fears, for the construction of the Magnolia refinery and other oil-related industries had ensured the city’s future as a petroleum processing center.

The railroads, which had supplanted the riverboats in transporting goods to and from the East Texas interior, made up a vast network connecting Beaumont with the rest of the country. In 1908 Beaumonters realized their long-held dream of a deepwater port for their city when a channel was dug in the Neches River, joining Beaumont with the Port Arthur ship channel. The city thus became a major shipping center.

Spindletop had generated a construction boom, bringing the downtown area a number of modern buildings, such as a new post office, fire station, and Baptist church, and several significant modern improvements, such as natural gas lines and an artesian water supply.1 New homes went up all over town, and soon the Averill Addition was a pleasant neighborhood containing a number of large, expensive homes.

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Medium 9781574411652

CHAPTER THIRTEEN Westward Once More

W. Dale Nelson University of North Texas Press PDF

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

Westward Once More

On May 13, 1846, a Congress caught up in the fever for westward expansion declared war on Mexico, and Baptiste

Charbonneau found himself enlisted in a mission that was to change his life. As an adult as he had been as a child, he was to be in the vanguard of one of the great westward movements of nineteenth century America. Baptiste signed on as a guide to General

Stephen W. Kearny on an expedition to occupy New Mexico and

California, and Kearny assigned him to the Mormon Battalion.1

Members of the rapidly growing Latter-Day Saints (Mormon) church had not much wanted to join the U.S. Army. As they saw it, the army had failed to protect them from persecution and mob action that had driven them from Illinois and Missouri to Iowa.

Their leaders, however, had a different view. One, former Postmaster General Amos Kendall, urged President James Knox Polk to “assist our emigration by enlisting one thousand of our men, arming, equipping and establishing them in California to defend the country.”2

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Medium 9780253018779

14 The Bomber Offensive against Buin

Ronnie Day Indiana University Press ePub

BY MID-OCTOBER THE ENEMY AIR RAIDS AGAINST THE 26TH AIR Flotilla at Buin had become intolerable,” Okumiya Masatake wrote after the war. “With its base constantly subjected to enemy bombs and strafing attacks, with living facilities reduced to the lowest possible level, and with a mounting loss of supply ships, the navy pulled out, moving its air strength directly to Rabaul.” As chief of staff to Sakamaki at Buin, Okumiya wrote from firsthand experience, but there were other factors, especially events in New Guinea, that affected the Japanese air war in the Solomons.1

The air offensive against Buin can be broken down into two phases. The first, which corresponded to the height of the fighting for Munda in July and August, saw mainly nighttime missions. There were exceptions, the shipping strikes in mid-July, which we have covered in regard to the Tokyo Express battles, and four daylight missions in August, which we will cover here. The second phase, September and October, saw a daylight formation bombing campaign against both airfields and base installations.

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Medium 9781574412680

Chapter 1 “A carnival of crime and corruption”

Bob Alexander University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter 1

“A carnival of crime and corruption”

Luke Gournay in Texas Boundaries: Evolution of the State’s Counties writes that Lampasas is a Spanish translation for an English language word: Lilies.1 There is another truism about Lampasas. Despite the genteel sounding name, at nineteenth-century Lampasas, Texas, there were not many lily-livered folks tramping around town or scattered throughout the county of Lampasas. Cobardes (cowards) were in short supply. The town, sitting at an eastern entrance to the enchanting Texas Hill Country, southwest of Waco and northwest of Austin, was “wide open and the saloonkeepers and gamblers had things their own way.” The sporting crowd was nervy, and growing more bold as each day folded into the next, that year of 1873. Legal statutes were but pesky inconveniences. Outside town limits the surrounding countryside was wonderfully productive cow country.

The range country was unfenced. Fattening cattle could during good weather nonchalantly graze on gently rolling uplands, slaking daily thirst in dependable spring-fed creeks sheltered by towering post oaks shading the rich bottom lands. When the mercury plunged, which was not too often, and frost nipped the air, those same limestone creek beds afforded warm and welcoming protection for Lampasas County cattlemen’s walking assets. Problematically those same secretive geographical sanctuaries shielding mamma cows and their newborn calves from nature’s indifference, were also screens for those bent toward a dab of cow stealing. Not so happily Lampasas

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