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Christmas Ornaments

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF
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Steel

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Lace

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Glassware

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Glassware

65

PICKING UP BROKEN PIECES OF GLASS

• Never use your bare hands to pick up broken glass. Little

slivers are difficult to see and you could end up injuring yourself. Carefully sweep broken glass into a dustpan.

Wrap the shards in newspaper and throw them out.

• To pick up tiny shards of glass, wipe all around the breakage area with a paper towel smeared with moist bar or liquid hand soap. Rinse with a water-soaked paper towel and wipe the area dry.

CLOUDY GLASS

• Antique decanters or bottles are sometimes stricken

with a cloudy or frosty condition called glass sickness.

This occurs when a liquid has been left in the container too long.

• Mix fine clay or sand with either water or denatured alcohol. Swish it around in the container until the blur disappears. If this fails and your glass is valuable, consult an expert in glass repair.

• If the piece is not very valuable you may also try these other solutions:

- Fill the glass container with water. Add one or two

tablespoons of ammonia, let stand overnight. Wash and rinse.

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Plastics

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF

Plastics

For this section we will use the generic word plastic to describe Celluloid, Lucite, Plexiglas, Bakelite, Catalin, and other polymer acrylic products.

Celluloid, the first synthetic plastic material, was developed in the 1860s and 1870s from a formulation of nitrocellulose and camphor. It is a moldable material that was capable of low-cost production in a variety of colors.

Celluloid was made into toiletry articles, novelties, photographic film, and many other mass-produced goods.

Celluloid is highly flammable and its popularity began to wane toward the middle of the 20th century, following the introduction of plastics based entirely on synthetic polymers. Lucite and Plexiglas are trademarked names of synthetic, colorless, and highly transparent materials with high stability and good resistance to weathering and to shock. Lucite and Plexiglas can be tinted or rendered opaque by the addition of other substances. They are usually fabricated by molding into solid articles or casting into sheets. Bakelite, invented in 1907, is a phenolic resin used for making vintage radio cases, jewelry, kitchen utensils, and a myriad of other highly collectible items.

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