92 Slices
Medium 9781574414516

Glassware

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF

Glassware

65

PICKING UP BROKEN PIECES OF GLASS

• Never use your bare hands to pick up broken glass. Little

slivers are difficult to see and you could end up injuring yourself. Carefully sweep broken glass into a dustpan.

Wrap the shards in newspaper and throw them out.

• To pick up tiny shards of glass, wipe all around the breakage area with a paper towel smeared with moist bar or liquid hand soap. Rinse with a water-soaked paper towel and wipe the area dry.

CLOUDY GLASS

• Antique decanters or bottles are sometimes stricken

with a cloudy or frosty condition called glass sickness.

This occurs when a liquid has been left in the container too long.

• Mix fine clay or sand with either water or denatured alcohol. Swish it around in the container until the blur disappears. If this fails and your glass is valuable, consult an expert in glass repair.

• If the piece is not very valuable you may also try these other solutions:

- Fill the glass container with water. Add one or two

tablespoons of ammonia, let stand overnight. Wash and rinse.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414516

Baskets

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574411638

Lynall Thomas

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Lynall Thomas

Not much is known about Lynall Thomas, an Englishman credited with the design of complicated rifled shells of doubtful effectiveness supplied to the Confederacy. The shell consisted of a narrow shell body with a very large head. Behind the head a lead sleeve and lead disk were cast and a midshell thick iron band put on the outside of the lead sleeve. Another lead disk separated the midshell iron band from a thick rear iron band.

Upon firing, the iron bands were forced forward on the lead sleeve, squeezing the lead disks into the rifling.

Shells of this design have been recovered in three calibers: 4.62-inch, 5.82-inch, and

6.4-inch. Almost all the shells in each caliber come from only a single area. The 4.62inch shells come from Awendaw and Charleston, South Carolina. The single 5.82-inch shell is from the West Point collection, and all of the 6.4-inch Lynall Thomas shells come from the areas around Fort Fisher and nearby Fort Caswell.

Only one complete fired specimen has been noted (the 6.4-inch shell documented in this book). It appears to have taken the rifling effectively.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574411638

Parrott

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Parrott

Robert Parker Parrott was both the most successful and the most controversial designer and founder of rifled cannon and projectiles of the Civil War. His West Point Foundry was located in Cold Spring, New York, across the Hudson River from the United States Military

Academy at West Point. During the war, Parrott and the West Point Foundry produced over 3,100 cannon, twice as many as the combined cannon production of all Confederate foundries and 33 percent more than any other Union foundry.1 Parrott also produced more rifled projectiles for the Union military forces than any other foundry.

Parrott got a head start in producing rifled cannon and projectiles because of his experimental work in the late 1850s. Parrott worked on rifled cannon designs in cooperation with Dr. John Read of Alabama, who worked on projectile designs.2 By 1861 they had already worked out many of the practical problems of integrated rifle-projectile design for field caliber artillery.

Parrott was already selling field caliber rifles to individual states before the war began.3

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414516

Enamel

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF

See All Slices