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Guide to Using Data Sheets

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Guide to Using Data Sheets

For the convenience of users, the data sheets for projectiles and torpedoes use a standard format. Descriptions of the information in each category are provided below.

Users should read this guide before using the data sheets.

Projectile Photos

Most projectile data sheets have photographs of the side, top, and bottom of the projectile. The ruler scale applies only to the side view of the projectile. It is important to note that the scale does not include the height of the fuze, only the length of the projectile.

The torpedo data sheets normally have only a side view and a close-up photo of the fuze or detonator mechanism. Most torpedo data sheets do not include a scale bar, because the torpedoes are too long for the scale numbers to be legible.

Projectile or Torpedo Identification Title

The projectile identification provides several key pieces of information. It first identifies the origin of the projectile or torpedo. Origin defines who manufactured the projectile or torpedo: CS, British/CS, or US. Next it identifies the caliber (e.g., bore size) of the cannon that fires the projectile.

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Lacquered Items

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574411638

Read

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Read

Dr. John Read was an early pioneer in the design of rifled projectiles. Working with

Robert Parrott at West Point and independently at Fort Monroe with the army, Read experimented with several designs, before developing and patenting a shell with a ring sabot in 1856 (No. 15999). Later, but before the war began, he improved the design with a safety groove to eliminate the chipping problem on the shell body base.1 Both wrought iron and copper2 were used for making his ring sabots. Early in the war large caliber Read projectiles almost universally used wrought iron. However, a shell documented in this section confirms the shift to copper sabots some time before April 1862.

While field-caliber Read projectiles performed satisfactorily, large-caliber Read projectiles did not perform well, for several reasons:

(a) the iron sabots were too thick on many Read projectiles and would not take the rifling;

(b) many of the copper sabots on Read shells were too thin and would tear off before the projectile took the rifling; and

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Mildew Cleaner

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574414516

Loupe: How to Use

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF

Loupe: How to Use

• A loupe (pronounced loop) is a useful tool to exam-

ine everything from diamonds to cast iron toys. With a little practice, almost anyone can learn how to use it properly.

For occasional use, it is more practical to hand hold a loupe away from your eye rather than learn to hold it to your eye like a monocle. Hand holding a loupe also means you do not have to remove eyeglasses, if you wear them.

Hold a watchmaker’s loupe between your thumb and forefinger.

Hold a diamond loupe the same way, but also wrap your fingers around the lens housing to help support the loupe.

If you are examining a small object, hold the object in your free hand. Brace your elbows against the sides of your body and bring both your hands up toward your face. You may brace your elbows on a table top if you are seated.

As you raise your hands, bring the fleshy part of your palms (the heels) together. This creates a movable hinge. Keeping the loupe close to your eye, pivot the hand with the object in and out until you get a sharp

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