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6: Itineraries of love life

Glocer Fiorini, Leticia Karnac Books ePub

Figures of love run through human history: filial love, maternal love, love between a man and a woman, homosexual love, the love of God. We find great love stories in literature and in myths: Romeo and Juliet, Don Juan, the Olympian loves between gods and mortals, the jealous love of Othello, interspersed with everyday love stories. We also know that love is part of the origins of psychoanalysis, and bring to mind the unhappy loves of Elizabeth von R., Dora, the young homosexual and Schreber. And fundamentally, that Freud introduces a new twist when he considers love as an instrument in the process of the cure and includes it in the analytic experience.

This leads us to what we could call the two facets of love: love as repetition and love as a project, and in this context we will try to elucidate the way in which the ideals interact with these two currents of the amorous experience. On the basis of this proposal, I examine two lines of development: courtly love and mother-child love. In both, I point out the concomitant power relations and their connections with the ideals involved.

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3 Spiral process and the dynamic field

Baranger, Madeleine; Baranger, Willy; Glocer Fiorini, Leticia Karnac Books ePub

3

Willy Baranger

It is difficult—but worth while and even necessary—for any human being to know where he is standing in relation to who his father was—whether it is paternity strictly speaking, in a familial sense, or symbolic paternity. I was linked to Enrique Pichon-Rivière by an analyst–analysand and teacher–disciple relation and later by a close friendship with a very talented and admired older friend. This is the framework for my present thoughts, a very personal backdrop to a work that is neither a story of a part of my life nor a eulogy for him.

Pichon-Rivière's formulations concerning the analytic process as “spiral process” date back to the years between 1954 and 1958 in the intellectual evolution of the author. We shared with the founding group of the Uruguayan Psychoanalytic Association the elaboration of some of Pichon-Rivière's ideas through many long “seminar” meetings. What did we study in those meetings? Freud's letters to Fliess (Masson, 1985), Freud's last works—”Analysis Terminable and Interminable” (1937c), “Constructions in Analysis” (1937d)—and also other authors, such as Henry Ezriel (“The psychoanalytic Session as an Experimental Situation”: 1951), Melanie Klein, and Paula Heimann.

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Practical information

Glocer Fiorini, Leticia Karnac Books ePub
Medium 9781855757615

1 “Insight” in the analytic situation

Baranger, Madeleine; Baranger, Willy; Glocer Fiorini, Leticia Karnac Books ePub

1

Madeleine Baranger & Willy Baranger

“What do they do? They dialogue.”

Sigmund Freud

The necessary character of the rules that determine the particulars of the analytic situation, the goal of the study of its dynamics, the aim of the instrument of psychoanalysis, interpretation, the core of the specific process of cure: all this is insight.

Given the crucial importance of this phenomenon, we cannot help wondering why insight has not been the object of more systematic specific studies and why its concept has not yet been more clearly delineated.

Our purpose here is to examine the function of insight within the analytic situation, starting from the generally—albeit not universally—accepted tenet among analysts since Freud that insight is the essential goal of all analytic processes.

This implies, then, that the analyst acts through his interpretation and not through “being”, contrary to what some people think— erroneously, in our opinion. The analytic experience is built on a basis of natural communication, artificially modified and codified by the pre-established framework of the analytic situation, between two human beings with functions determined by the very structure of the situation. This communication is the matter of psychoanalytic knowledge and work in so far as it is interpreted, producing a new communication between both parties on a different, elaborate level, corresponding to the “logos”. If this dialectic turn is missing, the psychoanalytic process fails, regardless of the “therapeutic” result.

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Chapter Seven: Otherness in the Field of Sexual Difference

Glocer Fiorini, Leticia Karnac Books ePub

As we said, the classical concept of sexual difference is questioned from different angles. On the one hand, from new theoretical and experiential positions in relation to women and the feminine which undoubtedly exert a strong effect on the field of the masculine. On the other hand, from ever more visible sexual and gender diversities manifest in contemporary cultures.

In this framework, we consider some implications of the concept of otherness in relation to this questioning.

To begin, we need to point out that the feminine and women are different categories although they also maintain necessary relations. We also need to work on these inevitably ambiguous relations. The same holds for the masculine and men.

Again, we need to distinguish between the feminine, female sexuality, femininity, and women, as well as between the masculine, male sexuality, masculinity, and men. This task makes analysis of the field of sexual and gender difference more complex.

First, the feminine and the masculine are dualistic categories in a binary polarity, principles strongly inserted into culture, as are yin and yang or sun and moon. Second, sexuality both feminine and masculine is implicated in the field of desire and the drive. Femininity and masculinity refer to codes, qualities, and norms expressed in identities and identifications labelled feminine or masculine. To examine these categories we need to take into account not only inevitable relations of concordance but also antagonisms that form the complexity of defining and categorising identities and the construction of subjectivity.

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