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7 Sightseeing Tours’ Impact on Well-being and Eudaimo nia

Uysal, M.; Sirgy, M.J.; Kruger, S. CABI PDF

7

Sightseeing Tours’ Impact on

Well-­being and Eudaimonia

Anita Zátori1* and Meghan Beardsley2

1Radford University, Radford, USA; 2Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, USA

Introduction

Tourism, as a discipline, has encountered fluid reinterpretation and analysis throughout its existence. Initially, academicians and practitioners assessed tourism’s value from solely an economic perspective. Now, there has been a steady shift of focus to the intrinsic impacts of tourism such as that of the well-­being, or quality of life

(QoL) of tourists and destination hosts (Sirgy and Uysal, 2016). Long-­term satisfaction, happiness and eudaimonia (human flourishment) are attributes that can be used to further explore tourism’s potential impacts on well-­being (Filep and Deery, 2010).

Value is not just how much tourism sells, but how it actually impacts the very person participating in the activity, whether they are the tour provider or the individual participating in said tour.

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5 Social Tourism as Correlates of Quality of Life: The Case of Disadvan- taged People

Uysal, M.; Sirgy, M.J.; Kruger, S. CABI PDF

5

Social Tourism as Correlates of Quality of Life: The Case of

Disadvantaged People

Raija Komppula* and Riikka Ilves

Centre for Tourism Studies, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland

Introduction

The aim of this chapter is to investigate the factors that affect the formation of the  social holiday experience, and the meaning of the experience for the holiday taker. Social holiday is defined as a manifestation of social tourism, which in most countries refers to ‘Tourism for all’, referring to activities of governments, local authorities, charities and/or other organizations aiming to support financially the opportunities for disadvantaged people to have a holiday away from home (see e.g.

Minnaert et  al., 2011). Tourism for all is a priority for the International Social

­Tourism Organization (ISTO) and for the social tourism sector generally (ISTO,

2016).

According to Richards (1999), vacations play a triple role in contributing to

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11 Quality-of-life Research in Tourism and Hospitality: Implications and Future Researc h

Uysal, M.; Sirgy, M.J.; Kruger, S. CABI PDF

11

Quality-­of-­life Research in

Tourism and Hospitality:

Implications and Future Research

Muzaffer Uysal,1* M. Joseph Sirgy2 and Stefan Kruger3

1Isenberg School of Management, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA;

2­Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, USA; 3North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa

Introduction

As we argue in our introduction, Chapter 1, there are ample opportunities to generate information on how quality-­of-­life (QoL) research is applied in different tourism and hospitality settings. The scope of such opportunities is huge, as one can imagine

– tourism and hospitality is a multifaceted sector with complex offerings and experience settings. These opportunities translate to best practices and case studies encouraging emulation and replication. The current book attempts to do just that, namely, provide a vehicle to publish best practices and case studies for others to emulate and replicate. The book is inspired by an earlier edited volume Handbook of Tourism and

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6 How to Make Someone Feel Welcome Somewhere, and Mean It. L’accueil Might Be the Answer

Uysal, M.; Sirgy, M.J.; Kruger, S. CABI PDF

6

How to Make Someone Feel

Welcome Somewhere, and Mean

It. L’accueil Might Be the Answer

François de Grandpré,1* Marc LeBlanc2 and Chantal Royer1

1Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (UQTR), Canada; 2Université de Moncton,

Canada

Introduction

What is the meaning of Accueil? L’accueil in tourism is a voluntary interpersonal act in a particular setting which introduces a stranger into a business, community or territory and makes it easier to access benefits from various utilitarian, recreational and cultural assets in that place during the stay. Even though l’accueil is primarily experienced during the visit, some of its components can be felt before and after.

We will address this definition inspired by Gouirand (2009) later, as it holds the key to understanding accueil, but it seems important to first provide a bit of background.

Accueil is a French word which is difficult to render in English. The words hospitality, hospitableness and welcome fall short in translating the deeper meaning of accueil.

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3 ‘To Mix with New People’: The Surprising Day Trips of Mature Germans

Uysal, M.; Sirgy, M.J.; Kruger, S. CABI PDF

3

‘To Mix with New People’: The

Surprising Day Trips of Mature

Germans

Ondrej Mitas,* Astrid Hohn and Jeroen Nawijn

Breda University of Applied Sciences, Breda, Netherlands

Introduction

Many developed countries are currently witnessing unprecedented demographic ageing. With improvements in health care and urban planning, mature adults are living longer, healthier, and more independent lives, and have thus become a larger and more active proportion of national populations. Many mature adults see no reason why they should not be able to travel in their leisure as far, as often, and as independently as their younger compatriots. Furthermore, partial or full retirement from working makes mature adults important for the tourism industry. After retirement, mature adults have substantially more time to travel. In countries with adequate health and social systems, such as those in Western Europe, mature adults also often retain the health and wealth needed to travel well past retirement. These dimensions of ageing result in the long-­standing, well-­documented effect that mature adults undertake tourism experiences more often, travel further, and spend more while on holiday (Blazey, 1992), while their propensity to travel has been steadily growing for years (Boksberger and Laesser, 2009).

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