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CHAPTER 7: Summary and Challenges

Kloppenborg, Timothy J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Project quality management truly is the merging of the two fields of project management and quality management. It is more than a knowledge area in project management and more than a means of better planning and managing improvement projects in quality. It is the systematic adaptation and use of quality tools and knowledge to meet the unique needs of projects.

The four project quality pillars of customer satisfaction, process improvement, fact-based management, and empowered performance are useful for structuring the activities and tools treated in each stage of the five-stage project quality process model: project quality initiation, project quality planning, project quality assurance, project quality control, and project quality closure. The structure of this dual field integration is summarized in the integrated project quality activity matrix presented as Figure 7-1.

While all of the activities shown in FIGURE 7-1 should be performed at some level (they can be streamlined on easy projects and may be very involved on difficult projects), some pose core project quality management challenges. The challenges arise either because these are unfamiliar activities that are not performed often in many organizations, because they are only partly performed, or because they are difficult to accomplish in and of themselves. In any event, many people do not realize the significance of each of these activities.

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CHAPTER 5 Project Closing

Kloppenborg, Timothy J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Closing is the final stage of the project leadership responsibilities model, as highlighted in Table 5-1. Closing is a fundamental element of the management of any project. By its very definition, a project is a temporary endeavor so there must be an ending. Despite the obvious importance of project closing, the specifics are often not performed well and sometimes not performed at all.

TABLE 5-1 Project Leader Responsibilities: Closing

As in the previous stages in the project lifecycle, seven project leadership tasks are involved in this stage:

•  Audit project

•  Terminate project

•  Capture and share lessons learned

•  Reassign workers

•  Reward and recognize participants

•  Celebrate project completion

•  Oversee administrative closure.

At CSM, the project office had an audit team that reviewed all projects. The audit team evaluated the financial schedule and the quality of the project results. The audit team found that the project was a week behind schedule. The audit report noted that for IT projects dealing with online transactions, stress testing is very important. The audit team suggested that the reasons for the success of this project were senior management support and the consistency of project priorities. It was also found that not all consultants hired were highly successful and that some of them had to be changed in the course of the project.

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APPENDIX A: Project Quality Participant Empowerment Readiness Assessment (PERA)

Kloppenborg, Timothy J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

The purpose of the PERA is to measure the project quality empowerment readiness level of individuals and/or teams. It can be used as a 360 degree personal or team self-assessment instrument for prospective sponsors, project managers, and core team members.

For each of the dimensions listed below, circle the number that most closely represents your perception of the individual or team under consideration, using the rating scale below. Comments are optional.

Project Technical Task Maturity: Add the numbers circled for questions 1, 4, 7, 10, and 12, and divide the total by 5.

Project Administrative Psychosocial Maturity: Add the numbers circled for questions 2, 5, 8, 13, and 15, and divide the total by 5.

Project Participant Moral Maturity: Add the numbers circled for questions 3, 6, 9, 11, and 14, and divide the total by 5.

Average scores for any of the factors:

0 – 4.0 = Individual or team is not ready for project quality empowerment at this time

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CHAPTER 2 Project Initiating

Kloppenborg, Timothy J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Project leaders have responsibilities related to setting and enforcing priorities, ensuring that project details are planned and executed, and ensuring integration both within and outside the project. They are also responsible for the formal human resources and personal human relations aspects of acquiring, overseeing, and rewarding project personnel. Project leaders also need to promote the project in order to secure and maintain the commitments of key project stakeholders at each stage in the project lifecycle. These responsibilities are summarized in Table 2-1, with the initiating stage highlighted.

Chapters 2–5 cover the four project lifecycle stages. Each will be divided into the seven major categories of project leader responsibilities. Each section will start by demonstrating project leaders’ challenges using the fictitious example of the company introduced in the case study, California Semiconductor Manufacturers (CSM). The project leadership considerations will be presented to help project leaders use the CSM project to assist them in resolving real-life issues on their own projects.

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APPENDIX A Project Leadership Assessment: Organizational

Kloppenborg, Timothy J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

This questionnaire contains statements about the characteristics of an organization and how it is supportive and creates a culture that encourages project leadership. Rate each item on a five-point scale indicating whether you agree or disagree with the statement. There are no right or wrong answers. Mark one answer only for each question.

1   Senior management creates an environment and culture that nurtures the growth and development of project leaders and their teams.

strongly disagree

disagree

neither disagree or agree

agree

strongly agree

 

2   Project leaders are encouraged to use vision to guide daily actions and decisions.

strongly disagree

disagree

neither disagree or agree

agree

strongly agree

 

3   Decisions affecting the project are made after long, careful consideration.

strongly disagree

disagree

neither disagree or agree

agree

strongly agree

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