18 Chapters
Medium 9781567261417

CHAPTER 1: Introduction to Project Quality Management

Kloppenborg, Timothy J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Project quality management is the combination of two fields: quality management and project management. Many factors—such as external global competitiveness, dynamic environmental changes, increased task complexity, and internal productivity improvement—have driven the parallel and separate evolution of quality management and project management. Superior quality and project management optimize the performance excellence of organizations, but their combined leverage is often underutilized. Quality processes can be used to improve project performance. Leaders who master project quality management will have greater success both on individual projects and on a portfolio of projects for their organizations.

An introduction to project quality management requires a basic understanding of: (1) the histories of the quality management and project management fields; (2) the conceptual foundations of project quality management; and (3) the need for improvement in project quality management.

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CHAPTER 3: Project Quality Planning

Kloppenborg, Timothy J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Planning is defined in the PMBOK© Guide as “the process in which defining and refining objectives and selecting the best of the alternative courses of action to attain the objectives that the project was undertaken to address are performed.”1 The quality planning stage begins with a commitment and authorization to proceed on a project, and ends with the kick-off meeting of project participants that signals the start of project execution. Quality planning follows quality initiation as the second stage in the five-stage project quality process model shown in Figure 3-1.

As is true of all five stages, the management activities will be much more involved on some projects than on others. Large, complex, unfamiliar projects will require more in-depth planning than smaller, simpler, more familiar projects. The typical quality planning activities required are depicted in the flowchart in Figure 3-2.

Project quality pillars, project activities, and project tools facilitate the movement from the signed authorization to proceed to the point at which all project stakeholders commit to the project plan. Table 3-1 categorizes the project quality pillars, activities, and tools for the quality planning stage into a project factors table.

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Medium 9781567261455

CHAPTER 5 Project Closing

Kloppenborg, Timothy J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Closing is the final stage of the project leadership responsibilities model, as highlighted in Table 5-1. Closing is a fundamental element of the management of any project. By its very definition, a project is a temporary endeavor so there must be an ending. Despite the obvious importance of project closing, the specifics are often not performed well and sometimes not performed at all.

TABLE 5-1 Project Leader Responsibilities: Closing

As in the previous stages in the project lifecycle, seven project leadership tasks are involved in this stage:

•  Audit project

•  Terminate project

•  Capture and share lessons learned

•  Reassign workers

•  Reward and recognize participants

•  Celebrate project completion

•  Oversee administrative closure.

At CSM, the project office had an audit team that reviewed all projects. The audit team evaluated the financial schedule and the quality of the project results. The audit team found that the project was a week behind schedule. The audit report noted that for IT projects dealing with online transactions, stress testing is very important. The audit team suggested that the reasons for the success of this project were senior management support and the consistency of project priorities. It was also found that not all consultants hired were highly successful and that some of them had to be changed in the course of the project.

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CHAPTER 1 The Origins of Project Leadership

Kloppenborg, Timothy J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

In this chapter we first discuss the basics of management and then review the two “children” of management that evolved in the latter part of the last century: leadership and project management. As we help the reader understand the basics of these three key disciplines, we will pave the way for discussion of a new approach that is evolving in the twenty-first century: project leadership. Figure 1-1 illustrates this evolution from management to project leadership.

The practice of management, defined for many centuries as planning, organizing, directing, and controlling, has existed since early times. Building the Great Wall of China, running the Roman Empire, and preparing armies for battle all required management skills; until the late nineteenth century, however, management was usually viewed as an art that was passed on from generation to generation by oral tradition. In the last hundred years, the science of management has developed. While management was once defined as “the ability work through others,” today most definitions are similar to the one offered by Courtland Bouee, in his book Management: “Management is the process of attaining organizational goals by effectively and efficiently planning, organizing, leading and controlling the organization’s human, physical, financial and informational resources.”1 This definition is presented graphically in Figure 1-2.

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CHAPTER 6 Project Leadership Challenges

Kloppenborg, Timothy J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

People have always planned, organized, implemented, and evaluated projects of many sizes and varieties. Until the industrial revolution, this was done in a very informal manner.

By the late nineteenth century, an ever-increasing amount of work was being mechanized and the study of mass production management was born. Many of the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling concepts and techniques that were developed at this time are still in use and also form a foundation for other developments.

Beginning at about the middle of the twentieth century two new trends in how to accomplish work started to coalesce. Many leaders recognized that the “science of management” was not enough, and many approaches to leadership were developed. While leaders from different walks of life continue to publish books on their secrets of success, students of leadership have been developing the discipline by looking for commonalities in the various schools of thought.

Project management is the second discipline that started to emerge in the middle of the twentieth century. People started to realize that planning, organizing, leading, and controlling one-time work efforts (projects) was not the same as for ongoing operations. The temporary nature and unique output of projects meant that they needed to be conducted in a different manner.

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