18 Chapters
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8 The Tourism Industry and Shark Welfare

Carr, N.; Broom, D.M. CABI PDF

8

The Tourism Industry and Shark Welfare

Wilfred Chivell*

Marine Dynamics Tours and Dyer Island Cruises,

Gansbaai, South Africa

*  Corresponding author: wilfred@sharkwatchsa.com

© CAB International 2018. Tourism and Animal Welfare (N. Carr and D.M. Broom)

97

W. Chivell

Does the Tourism Industry Have Obligations to Ensure

Good Welfare of Sharks?

Absolutely, we have to protect the species that we rely on for a living as well as ensure that the fragile marine ecosystem remains healthy and at optimal function for the diversity of marine life to thrive in the future. It is a sad fact that the South African great white shark population is not showing the expected recovery since its decline prior to protection. They face many threats: along our own coastline we can lose around 25 or more annually in the Kwazulu Natal shark nets and drumlines. These nets are based on historic fatal attacks on swimmers in that area by sharks and there are now many more beach users in Kwazulu Natal because of the warmer waters. The great whites also migrate to unprotected waters such as those off Mozambique and the Western Indian

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12 Lessons from Winnie-the-Pooh: How Responsible Bear Tourism Can Teach Us Respect and Compassion, and Benefit Bears

Carr, N.; Broom, D.M. CABI PDF

12

Lessons from Winnie-the-Pooh: How

Responsible Bear Tourism Can Teach Us

Respect and Compassion, and Benefit Bears

Sara Dubois*

University of British Columbia and British Columbia SPCA Chief

Scientific Officer, Canada

*  Corresponding author: sara.dubois@ubc.ca

© CAB International 2018. Tourism and Animal Welfare (N. Carr and D.M. Broom)

119

S. Dubois

Life is a journey to be experienced, not a problem to be solved.

A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh

The most famous bear tourist attraction to date is perhaps Winnie at the London Zoo from

1915 to 1934, who inspired author A.A. Milne’s collection of stories for his son Christopher

Robin. Named for the Canadian city of Winnipeg, the pet orphaned bear cub was purchased by a Canadian veterinarian in Ontario while en route to England to volunteer for cavalry service during the First World War (Walker, 2015). Later donated to the zoo, Winnie was a star attraction at a time when zoological collections were the only way most people could see a bear from a foreign and distant land.

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14 Cats and Dogs International

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14

Cats and Dogs

International

Darci Galati*

President/CEO of CANDi

*  Corresponding author: dgalati08@gmail.com

132

© CAB International 2018. Tourism and Animal Welfare (N. Carr and D.M. Broom)

Cats and Dogs International

The idea for CANDi – Cats and Dogs International – was born when my three young daughters and I were on a family vacation in Mexico in 2006. We were literally astounded by the staggering number of stray cats and dogs in the vicinity. There did not seem to be any animal welfare laws in place to protect them, let alone humane shelters or even veterinary care. Most of the animals were emaciated and in desperate need of medical attention. This had a profound effect on my children, who were distraught at the notion that they would soon be flying back home and leaving behind the cats and dogs they had fed and helped to fend for themselves. I knew I had to do something and I promised my daughters that I would make a difference. That was the impetus behind the creation of CANDi, a non-profit global organization with a mission to save the lives of stray animals at tourist destinations.

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19 The Future and Moving Forward Together

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19

The Future and Moving

Forward Together

Introduction

In a traditional book, this would be the place to have a ‘conclusion’. However, ‘conclusion’

­suggests an end. Instead of wishing to see this as the point to conclude the discussion, this part is constructed as the position from which to move forwards, in research, industry and activist senses, in how we look at the relation between tourism and animal welfare and how we encourage the tourism industry and tourists towards preventing poor welfare of animals. We hope that the book, in addition to being a source of information and opinion, can help to drive improvements in animal welfare. Consequently, the chapter provides a brief look at the potential future of tourism and animal-related tourism, and animal welfare debates. What is the likely future of animal welfare in tourism? Finally, what should be the research agenda to improve welfare?

What is the Future of Tourism and Animal-related Tourism?

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5 Public Aquariums in the 21st Century – What’s Next, Before It’s Too Late?

Carr, N.; Broom, D.M. CABI PDF

5

Public Aquariums in the 21st

Century – What’s Next, Before

It’s Too Late?

Christopher Andrews*

California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, and Merlin

Animal Welfare and Development, Tennessee

*  Corresponding author: chris.andrews@merlinentertainments.biz

© CAB International 2018. Tourism and Animal Welfare (N. Carr and D.M. Broom)

75

C. Andrews

The United Nations Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020 is a key initiative . . . to halt and eventually reverse the loss of biodiversity. The very first target of this plan states that ‘by

2020, at the latest, people are aware of the values of biodiversity and the steps they can take to  conserve and use it sustainably.’ Zoos and aquariums worldwide, attracting more than

700 million visits every year, could potentially make a positive contribution to this target.

Moss et al. (2015, p. 537)

Public Aquariums: Their First 150 Years

The Age of Enlightenment emerged from the centuries-long Age of Exploration and developed into the Industrial Revolution, and Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species was published in 1859.

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