18 Chapters
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2 Animal Sentience, Ethics and Welfare

Carr, N.; Broom, D.M. CABI PDF

2

Animal Sentience,

Ethics and Welfare

Introduction

This chapter provides a discussion of the concept of animal welfare and the development of our understanding of this. This discussion is set within the wider discussion of animal sentience, recognizing that an awareness of the sentience of animals is related to concerns about and our definition of their welfare. While recognizing that our understanding of animal sentience and welfare and operationalization of the latter are situated within the reality of a human-centric world, the chapter argues that analysis of the welfare of animals must be led from a scientific perspective, which identifies how animal behaviour and welfare can be objectively assessed.

However, to close the loop on the relation between animals as independent entities and their position within a human-dominated world where their welfare, directly and indirectly, is almost always influenced by humans, it is necessary to think about evaluation of happiness and human perception of animal welfare. The balancing act required by this is both controversial and potentially problematic, as it may bring into conflict the epistemological and ontological beliefs of those concerned with animal welfare. Yet within a postmodernist world that seeks to understand the complexity of the world rather than engage in reductionist rhetoric, there is arguably no reason why all methodological perspectives should not be able to come together to gain a better understanding of animal welfare for the benefit of animals. Following on from a discussion of the measurement of animal welfare, the chapter ends with a brief examination of the position of animal welfare in law.

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17 Sport Hunting Tourism

Carr, N.; Broom, D.M. CABI PDF

17

Sport Hunting Tourism

Dr Jane Goodall, DBE*

Founder – the Jane Goodall Institute and UN Messenger of

Peace (www.janegoodall.org)

*  Corresponding author: mlewis@janegoodall.org

© CAB International 2018. Tourism and Animal Welfare (N. Carr and D.M. Broom)

145

J. Goodall

There is a section of tourism that is devoted to ‘sport’ hunters. Recently this became an

­international news item when a Minnesota dentist, Walter Palmer, killed Cecil the lion with a crossbow. Cecil was not killed outright but spent 40 hours wounded and in pain before he was found and finished off. Subsequently a rival male killed one of Cecil’s cubs who were abandoned by Cecil’s brother, Jericho. Almost certainly the other cubs have been killed as well. This is what lions do when they take over a pride, thus eliminating the genes of their rivals.

Palmer’s behaviour was despicable on many counts. But the reason that his behaviour b­ ecame the subject of anger and hatred around the world was because Cecil was a known individual.

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15 Animal Welfare – Driving Improvements in Tourism Attractions

Carr, N.; Broom, D.M. CABI PDF

15

Animal Welfare – Driving

Improvements in Tourism

Attractions

Clare Jenkinson* and Hugh Felton

Association of British Travel Agents, London, UK

*  Corresponding author: cjenkinson@abta.co.uk

© CAB International 2018. Tourism and Animal Welfare (N. Carr and D.M. Broom)

135

C. Jenkinson and H. Felton

Viewing and interacting with animals can be a popular and rewarding part of a holiday. ABTA consumer research found that one in four people had some kind of interaction with animals as part of their trip and it was recognized that the travel industry can play an important part in enabling the experience to be a positive one for customers, local people and, most importantly, the animals themselves.

Travel provider members of ABTA’s Animal Welfare Working Group analysed the rapid growth of animal attractions and animal interactions experiences within the supply chain. Strong links have developed between tourism destinations and animal attractions, and for customers good animal welfare standards were becoming increasingly important. Our members were

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4 Animal Welfare and Tourism: Are the Aims Mutually Exclusive or Potentially Inclusive?

Carr, N.; Broom, D.M. CABI PDF

4

Animal Welfare and Tourism:

Are the Aims Mutually Exclusive or Potentially Inclusive?

Introduction

In this chapter we build on the previous two, which looked at the concept of animal welfare and the position of animals in the tourism experience, to discuss and provide evidence of the extent to which the aims to ensure that animal welfare is good and to promote tourism are mutually exclusive or can be potentially inclusive of one another. In other words, the chapter is focused on assessing whether a tourism experience and industry does, or can, exist that takes into consideration and meets the needs of animals so that their welfare is good. To do this, the chapter begins by exploring some topics where we have information about the history and current situation of animal welfare in tourism. This section builds on Chapter 2 by recognizing that, as well as having a scientific grounding, concern for animal welfare is a social phenomenon and as such varies culturally and has varied over time as attitudes have changed. This raises the point that we must be careful to avoid claims of cultural imperialism when examining animal welfare issues in different human cultures. There is also a need to view the historical position of animals in relation to tourism through the social values of the time rather than through a contemporary lens.

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14 Cats and Dogs International

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14

Cats and Dogs

International

Darci Galati*

President/CEO of CANDi

*  Corresponding author: dgalati08@gmail.com

132

© CAB International 2018. Tourism and Animal Welfare (N. Carr and D.M. Broom)

Cats and Dogs International

The idea for CANDi – Cats and Dogs International – was born when my three young daughters and I were on a family vacation in Mexico in 2006. We were literally astounded by the staggering number of stray cats and dogs in the vicinity. There did not seem to be any animal welfare laws in place to protect them, let alone humane shelters or even veterinary care. Most of the animals were emaciated and in desperate need of medical attention. This had a profound effect on my children, who were distraught at the notion that they would soon be flying back home and leaving behind the cats and dogs they had fed and helped to fend for themselves. I knew I had to do something and I promised my daughters that I would make a difference. That was the impetus behind the creation of CANDi, a non-profit global organization with a mission to save the lives of stray animals at tourist destinations.

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