36 Chapters
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34: Non-government Organizations’ Mountain Management: A Sustainable Support Model for Southern Oregon’s Mountain Destinations

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

34 

Non-government Organizations’

Mountain Management: A Sustainable

Support Model for Southern Oregon’s

Mountain Destinations

1

Byron Marlowe1* and Alison Burke2

Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA; 2Southern Oregon

University, Ashland, Oregon, USA

Introduction

Mountains are increasingly dependent upon the support of non-governmental organizations

(NGOs). These usually involve grassroots efforts, mobilized by ordinary citizens. NGOs and communities are representative of a broad spectrum within a targeted region and are indicative of the heterogeneity of their various community groups (Maxwell, 2005). Their nonprofit status allows them the freedom to tackle different objectives specific to the region, such as climate considerations, sustainability and community support. In southern Oregon, NGO employees and volunteer workers are increasingly valuable in the sustainable future of the region’s mountain recreation and tourism.

Non-governmental organizations in the

Southern Oregon region within the USA are responsible for several management strategies including land stewardship, fundraising, hotel operations, food service, travel marketing and education. Each NGO is comprised of local individuals and private citizen donations, there is a unique devotion and commitment to longterm goals, protecting the ecology of the region,

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4: Creating Tourist Experiences in European Alpine Areas: Beyond Mass Tourism

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

4 

Creating Tourist Experiences in European Alpine Areas:

Beyond Mass Tourism

Umberto Martini* and Federica Buffa

University of Trento, Trento, Italy

Introduction

The Alps have experienced profound economic and social change in recent decades, with the landscape having been considerably modified due to the development of the tourist industry. The key pillars of the tourist industry in the Alps are skiing in winter and hiking and climbing in summer. The success of the Alps’ main tourism products has led to the development of a mass tourism model, where large sums have been invested in areas such as accommodation capacity, cable car systems, and transport and mobility, and where tourist flows are concentrated in short, seasonal peaks of no more than a few weeks. The sustainability of mass mountain tourism is being called into question due to both internal and external factors. The latter includes the impact of global warming on snow reliability during the ski season

(Elsasser and Bürki, 2002; Agrawala, 2007) and ongoing changes in international tourist demand (Dwyer et al., 2009).

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19: Hiking Tourism in Germany’s Low and High Mountain Regions

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

19 

Hiking Tourism in Germany’s Low and High Mountain Regions

Axel Dreyer* and Anne Menzel

Harz University of Applied Sciences, Wernigerode, Germany

Introduction

Over recent years, approximately 30% of the

German population aged 14 and over chose regions in Germany as their preferred holiday destination (Schrader, 2013; Schmuecker and Koch, 2014; FUR, 2015). The most popular destinations for hiking holidays in

Germany are mountains (BMWi, 2010).

According to a study of PROJECT M et al.

(2014), the low mountain ranges of the Black

Forest (Schwarzwald), Bavarian Forest (Bayerischer Wald), the Harz Mountains, as well as the Allgäu (low mountain range and A

­ lpine foothills – ‘Alpen’) are the preferred destination areas. Another hiking region, though less popular overall for Germans is the Alps, a high mountain range system that lies entirely in Europe and in the deepest south of

Germany. Figure 19.1 shows the locations of the most important low mountain regions in

Germany.

In Germany there are no world-famous hiking routes or trails like the Inca Trail in Peru, the West Coast Trail in British Columbia or the

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10: Tourism-led Amenity Migration in a Mountain Community: Quality of Life Implications for Fernie, British Columbia

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

10 

Tourism-led Amenity Migration in a

Mountain Community: Quality of Life

Implications for Fernie, British Columbia

Peter W. Williams,1* Alison M. Gill1 and Jeff M. Zukiwsky2

1

Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada;

2

Zumundo Consultants, Fernie, Canada

Introduction

Globalization forces linked to changes in socio-­ political systems, as well as innovations in communications, transportation, and workplace technologies, have fuelled unprecedented opportunities for people to visit, live, work, and/ or retire in areas possessing high quality of life

(QoL) amenities (Sheller and Urry, 2006).

These amenities include attractive recreation and cultural facilities, scenic and healthy natural environments, efficient transportation and communication systems, and vital community support services (Moss, 2006). The flows of people drawn to places possessing such attributes are often referred to as amenity-led migrations, and the participants are amenity migrants.

Because of their unique combination of tourism and community QoL assets, mountain resort communities are increasingly the destination of choice for amenity migrants (Chipeniuk and Rapport, 2008). Those motivated primarily to move to such places because of the presence of tourism-related assets and opportunities are referred to as tourism-led amenity migrants (Williams and Hall, 2000). A particularly important subset of this group ­comprises

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9: People and Communities in Mountain Tourism: Overview, Contextual Development and Areas of Focus

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

9 

People and Communities in Mountain

Tourism: Overview, Contextual

Development and Areas of Focus

John S. Hull* and Harold Richins

Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

Introduction

This chapter provides an introduction to Part III, which explores aspects of people and communities in mountain tourism, including a broad range of topics, diverse geographical areas, and discussion regarding communities that have evolved in mountain areas. The people that visit and/or reside in mountain regions are normally significant participants in recreation and tourism activities. Meeting and integrating their interests with the diverse residential needs specific to mountain communities introduces opportunities, challenges, impacts, and outcomes. Planning processes and efforts to build infrastructure and services in what is often a harsh mountain environment that is dynamically changing, can be extremely challenging, but it is this very circumstance that requires careful consideration and the need for issues to be addressed.

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