36 Chapters
Medium 9781780644608

15: Australia’s Alpine Areas: Motivations, Experiences and Satisfaction of Visitors to Mt Kosciuszko

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

15 

Australia’s Alpine Areas:

Motivations, Experiences and

Satisfaction of Visitors to Mt Kosciuszko

Tracey Dickson*

University of Canberra, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia

‘From the forest and wilderness come the tonics and barks which brace mankind.’

Henry David Thoreau, Walking (1862)

Introduction

The natural areas in alpine and mountain

­regions, especially summits, have been key attractions for tourists in winter and summer for decades. Mt Kosciuszko is one of those alpine summit destinations. Mt Kosciuszko is Australia’s highest point, and is located in the Snowy

Mountains, New South Wales (Fig. 15.1). It is of environmental and cultural significance to local Aboriginals as well as to current generations. Mt Kosciuszko in Kosciuszko National

Park (KNP) is a popular winter destination, but the summit also has special appeal for summer visitors when the snow has gone. This chapter explores the issues related to understanding why people are drawn to alpine natural areas; how people experience their natural world; how to support their ongoing and sustainable participation in often fragile environments; and to support the visitation to, and management of, those areas for future generations.

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1: Overview of Mountain Tourism: Substantive Nature, Historical Context, Areas of Focus

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

1 

Overview of Mountain Tourism:

Substantive Nature, Historical Context,

Areas of Focus

Harold Richins,1* Sydney Johnsen2 and Dr John S. Hull1

Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada;

2

Peak Planning Associates, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

1

The Aim of This Book on Mountain

Tourism

The aim of this book is to advance the literature in the field of mountain tourism. In particular, this book aims to broaden the discussion on the diversity of perspectives, interactions and roles of mountain tourism, through an interdisciplinary and management context that addresses communities, impacts, development approaches, planning and governance, natural environment, and creation of mountain tourism experiences.

Mountain Tourism: Experiences, Communities, Environments and Sustainable

Futures contains five thematic areas, each with an overview and relevant case studies. These themes include: (i) the creation of mountain tourism experiences; (ii) people and communities in mountain tourism; (iii) natural environments in mountain tourism; (iv) impacts and solutions in mountain tourism; and (v) development, planning and governance approaches in mountain tourism. Mountain areas from around the world are covered in this edited book including areas within Europe, Asia-Pacific, North

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11: In the Shadow of Machu Picchu: A Case Study of the Salkantay Trail

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

11 

In the Shadow of Machu Picchu:

A Case Study of the Salkantay Trail

Joe Pavelka*

Mount Royal University, Calgary, Canada

Introduction

Travel to Peru has risen sharply in the past two decades from 479,000 in 1995 to over 3.1 million in 2013 (Index Mundi, 2014) and so has travel to the cultural site of Machu Picchu, Peru’s primary attraction. Just over 70% of all international travellers to Peru visit Machu Picchu

(Pavelka, 2010). There are few attractions in the world with such a prominent role in a nation’s tourism and identity (Shullenberger, 2008) as

Machu Picchu, which stands as a visual focal point of indigenous cultural reawakening. It acts as the economic engine of tourism, and it fuels constant debate of its environmental carrying capacity, with arguments that daily visitor limits threaten its ecological integrity (Lincoln and

Neelam, 2012). Machu Picchu differs from many other attractions because the experience of Machu

Picchu involves two distinct components: getting to the site and the site itself. Machu Picchu receives about 2500 visitors each day (Zan and

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7: Significant Innovation in the Development and Provision of Heli-ski Mountain Experiences: The Case of Mike Wiegele Helicopter Skiing

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

7 

Significant Innovation in the

Development and Provision of Heli-ski

Mountain Experiences: The Case of Mike

Wiegele Helicopter Skiing

Harold Richins*

Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

Innovation in Special Niche Tourism

Experience Development

Tourism, and particularly special niche tourism, has advanced through a multitude of innovative practices over the last 50 years (Poon, 1993;

Rachman and Richins, 1997; Benckendorff et al., 2014; Neuhofer et al., 2014). These innovative practices are found in both major and minor tourism product/service experience

­provision developments; through innovation in channel/promotion methods; and in the methods for accessing these experiences (Novelli, 2005;

Swarbrooke and Horner, 2005; Scarinci and

Richins, 2008).

Innovation has been defined and conceptualized in diverse ways (Peters and Pikkematt,

2005). The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development defined enterprise innovation as: ‘The implementation of a new or significantly improved product (good or service), or process, a new marketing method, or a new organizational method in business practices, workplace organization or external relations’

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27: Tourism and Change in Nepal’s Mt Everest Region

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

27 

Tourism and Change in Nepal’s

Mt Everest Region

Sanjay K. Nepal*

University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

Introduction

Mountain regions around the world are one of  the major hotspots for adventure tourism development. This is especially true in the

­

Nepalese Himalaya; since the opening up of the country for the first time to the outside world in 1951 (the country had been closed to foreigners), international tourism has effectively positioned the Nepalese Himalaya as a premier mountain adventure destination (Nepal,

2003). Nepal has seen an unprecedented growth in mountaineering and trekking tourism over the last 10 years (Nepal, 2010).

A few classic Himalayan destinations, including the Annapurna and Everest regions in Nepal, continue to attract large numbers of

­adventure-seeking tourists. Even during the politically volatile period, international tourism in these two regions continued to thrive. As a result, remote mountain villages, such as Namche

Bazaar in the Everest region, have transformed into cosmopolitan villages that cater primarily to international tourists (Nepal et al., 2002).

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